10 Artworks From Artnet’s Gallery Network That Our Experts Are Loving This Week

Each week, our gallery liaisons share their favorite works from the Artnet Gallery Network.

Sohan Qadri, Untitled (2001). Courtesy of Kumar Gallery.
Sohan Qadri, Untitled (2001). Courtesy of Kumar Gallery.

Every week, we explore the thousands of galleries on the Artnet Gallery Network to highlight the spaces and artworks inspiring us right now. Take a look at our latest picks below.

Marie Cécile Thijs
Dandelion Rose
SmithDavidson Gallery
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Marie Cécile Thijs, Dandelion Rose. Courtesy of SmithDavidson Gallery.

Marie Cécile Thijs, Dandelion Rose. Courtesy of SmithDavidson Gallery.

In this image Dutch photographer Marie Cecile Thijs combines a dandelion and rose to form a fantastical flower that nevertheless possesses a mesmerizing sense of realness. Floating freely in space against a muted, empty backdrop reminiscent of a Dutch still life, The Dandelion Rose embodies the captivating mix of both hyper-real and imaginative elements for which Thijs is so well known.
— Alexandra Schott

Kim Tschang-Yeul
Water Drops
Tina Kim Gallery
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Kim Tschang-Yeul, Water Drops (1973). Courtesy of Tina Kim Gallery.

Kim Tschang-Yeul, Water Drops (1973). Courtesy of Tina Kim Gallery.

One of the pioneers in Korean Modern Art movement, Kim Tschang-Yeul is famed for his depictions of water droplets, a motif he began exploring over fifty years ago after moving to Paris in 1969. The emblem is simple but fluid, at once channeling the irony of Pop Art, the symbolic grief of war, and the sense of harmony sought in Eastern philosophy.
— Julia Yook

Lori Dubois
Frozen
Emillions Art
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Lori Dubois, Frozen (2016). Courtesy of Emillions Art.

Lori Dubois, Frozen (2016). Courtesy of Emillions Art.

Painter Lori Dubois’ seascapes are abstracted, and often tumultuous. In this winter scene, the horizon is demarcated by dark, muddled line across the canvas, with the sea and sky seemingly mirroring one another in ice blue and periwinkle tones. It’s easy to imagine the silence of the scene, which I find both tranquil and calming.
—  Karin Petit

Klaus Leidorf
Lost 22
Contempop Gallery
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Klaus Leidorf, Lost 22 (2016). Courtesy of Contempop Gallery New York.

Klaus Leidorf, Lost 22 (2016). Courtesy of Contempop Gallery New York.

For over 30 years, aerial photographer Klaus Leidorf has captured aerial scenes from the window of his Cessna 172 aircraft. In this work, Leidorf highlights the vastness of the sea by juxtaposing the richness of its deep color and rippling waves with the minuscule brightly colored boat cutting through the waves.
— Nan Stewart

 

Tom Hammick
Terrestrial
Galerie Boisserée.
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Tom Hammick, Terrestrial (2017). Courtesy of Galerie Boisserée.

Tom Hammick, Terrestrial (2017). Courtesy of Galerie Boisserée.

An enormous moon lights the way in this scene of a nightly stroll, which seems to almost magically attract the anonymous group of walkers who venture resolutely into the darkened woods.  British painter Tom Hammick, who has a penchant for ambiguous, nocturnal scenes describes his works as “imaginary dreamscapes. ” I find a certain sense of melancholy in the moment, which seems almost derived from a cinematic vision of dystopia.
— Miriam Minak

Sohan Qadri
Untitled
Kumar Gallery
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Sohan Qadri, Untitled (2010) Courtesy of Kumar Gallery.

Sohan Qadri, Untitled (2010) Courtesy of Kumar Gallery.

The Rothkoesque way these fields of scarlett and deep plum bleed into each other is absolutely beautiful. Qadri, who was born in British-ruled India and lived for over 30 years in Copenhagen, created ink and dye works that were meant to a meditative tranquility as well as the vivid beauty of his homeland, as seen in this work.
—  Neha Jambhekar

Romeo V. Tabuena
Sunset
Skot Foreman Fine Art
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Romeo V. Tabuena, Sunset (1969). Courtesy of Skot Foreman Fine Art.

Romeo V. Tabuena, Sunset (1969). Courtesy of Skot Foreman Fine Art.

Romeo V. Tabuena was a Filipino painter and print-maker who embraced Cubist and geometric patterns. Here, Tabuena brings the viewer into this tropical dream-like landscape, the pink hue used in this painting is quite enchanting.
— Qadira Farrington

Berta Fischer
Hiroxi
James Fuentes
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Berta Fischer, Hiroxi (2019). Courtesy of James Fuentes.

Berta Fischer, Hiroxi (2019). Courtesy of James Fuentes.

Fischer’s sculptures are intriguing optical forms. The shifting undulations and fluorescent sheen are more commonly seen in digital renderings, but Fischer is able to translate this language through the meticulous use of acrylic materials. The work suggests a sense of galactic wonder built into seductive gem-like compositions that are just as fascinating in-person as in photographs.
— Santiago Garcia Cano

 

Robert Adams
Expressway, Near Colton, California
Peter Lund Gallery
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Robert Adams, Expressway, Near Colton, California (1982).  Courtesy of Peter Lund Gallery.

Robert Adams, Expressway, Near Colton, California (1982).  Courtesy of Peter Lund.

California is rarely depicted in such moody and melancholy black-and-white scenes as this. Here, the misty highway glimpsed through the thicket trees made me pause and consider how our need for speed and convenience has affected our vision of the natural world.
—Sara Carson

Yigal Ozeri
P5950328
Amy Li Gallery
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Yigal Ozeri, P5950328 (2018). Courtesy of Amy Li Gallery.

Yigal Ozeri, P5950328 (2018). Courtesy of Amy Li Gallery.

This photograph of a New York City hot dog cart and some passing pedestrians has an almost Pop art effect with the saturated hues of yellow, blue, and red, and a seemingly innumerable clutter of signs busily pulling the eye in many directions. The effect is inexplicably comedic.
— Tobias Molitor

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