10 Artworks From Artnet’s Gallery Network That Our Experts Are Loving This Week

Each week, our gallery liaisons share their favorite works from the Artnet Gallery Network.

Anna Breit, Untitled (2019). Courtesy of OstLicht. Gallery for Photography.
Anna Breit, Untitled (2019). Courtesy of OstLicht. Gallery for Photography.

Every week, we explore the thousands of galleries on the Artnet Gallery Network to highlight the spaces and artworks inspiring us right now. Take a look at our latest picks below.

Maria Helena Vieira da Silva
La Cuisine (The Kitchen)
BAILLY GALLERY
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Maria Helena Vieira da Silva, La Cuisine (The Kitchen) (1950). Courtesy of Bailly Gallery.

Maria Helena Vieira da Silva, La Cuisine (The Kitchen) (1950). Courtesy of Bailly Gallery.

In La Cuisine, Maria Helena Vieira da Silva uses techniques from her early exploration into Cubism and Geometric Abstraction in her interpretation of post-war life in Europe. She combines grids and shapes to create the illusion of depth and the perception of space. Through the use of color and lines, Vieira da Silva creates a texture that gives life and energy into the otherwise mundane subject matter of a kitchen interior.

Nan Stewart

Charles Victor Guilloux
Allée d’eau n°2
Didier Aaron
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Charles Victor Guilloux, Allée d’eau n°2 (1900). Courtesy of Didier Aaron.

Charles Victor Guilloux, Allée d’eau n°2 (1900). Courtesy of Didier Aaron.

Guilloux’s works fascinate me because of their unique mix of Symbolist and Impressionist landscape, in a style that feels oddly contemporary. L’allée d’eau is a setting revisited by the artist many times, one that could be placed in memories of Versailles or park walkways. What ultimately draws the viewer in the dreamy, almost sci-fi depiction of the moon, with two seemingly endless rows of trees leading the eye back into the distance.  

Santiago Garcia Cano

Renée Sintenis
Shetlandpony
Galerie Thomas
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Renée Sintenis, Shetlandpony (1941). Courtesy of Galerie Thomas.

Renée Sintenis, Shetland Pony (1941). Courtesy of Galerie Thomas.

Renée Sintenis embodied the concept of the “Neue Frau” or New Woman, an important trope of the Berliner Bohème during the Weimar Republic. She was well known for her small sculptures of animals, in which she was particularly interested in capturing the movement, as this Shetland pony does wonderfully. The sculpture has a great sense of excitement, with the pony’s hind leg ready to kick or with a strong gust of wind rustling it from behind.

Alexandra Schott

Gun Roze
Spring Street
Bougie Art Gallery
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Gun Roze, Spring Street (1982). Courtesy of Bougie Art Gallery.

Gun Roze, Spring Street (1982). Courtesy of Bougie Art Gallery.

There are few things I love more than old photos of New York City, which capture the style and unchanging swagger of the city and its denizens. Canadian photographer Gun Roze shot this particular image in 1982. Here, an older woman dressed in all white crosses Spring Street walking a black and white dog on a leash. Her white tee-shirt is emblazoned simply with the word “ART” in black, capital letters. Two men look on, admiring the level of drip exuding from this woman. I love that the crosswalk also reads “walk”, defying the stereotype that all New Yorkers jay-walk. 

Cristina Cruz

Henri Jean Guillaume Martin
La Vallée du Lot Vue Depuis la Maison de St Cirq Lapopie
Willow Gallery
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Henri Jean Guillaume Martin, La Vallée du Lot Vue Depuis la Maison de St Cirq Lapopie. Courtesy of Willow Gallery.

Henri Jean Guillaume Martin, La Vallée du Lot Vue Depuis la Maison de St Cirq Lapopie. Courtesy of Willow Gallery.

Henri Jean Guillaume Martin was a Neo-Impressionist who moved from Paris to near Cahors in south-west France and, finding tranquility in the countryside, began to paint the richly-colored landscapes he’s best known for. In this example, the lush foliage blends with the red roofs of the village to create a scene that glows with autumn sunshine. 

Sara Carson 

Anna Breit
Untitled
OstLicht, Gallery for Photography
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Anna Breit, Untitled, from the series "Girls" (2018). Courtesy of Gallery for Photography.

Anna Breit, Untitled, from the series “Girls” (2018). Courtesy of OstLicht, Gallery for Photography.

I find this Anna Breit photograph from her “Girls” series both warming and empowering. Five various young women embrace as they look out over a lake. It’s an image that captures a spirit of solidarity and camaraderie that’s a glimmer of hope in restless times. 

Miriam Minak

Pablo Picasso
Dancing Figures
White Cross Art
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Pablo Picasso, Dancing Figures (1956). Courtesy of White Cross Art.

Pablo Picasso, Dancing Figures (1956). Courtesy of White Cross Art.

Picasso’s dear friend Matisse more often depicted the jubilant spirit of dance in his artwork, but Picasso sometimes embraced the subject matter too. This print by the Spanish master brings to mind the joy of spring, with two figures dancing joyfully in a field of grass, under a bright blue sky.

Qadira Farrington

Leon Louis Dolice
Empire State Building
Helicline Fine Art
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Leon Louis Dolice, Empire State Building. Courtesy of Helicline Fine Art.

Leon Louis Dolice, Empire State Building. Courtesy of Helicline Fine Art.

Austrian Leon Louis Dolice arrived in New York in the 1920s and soon started to spend all his time capturing the architecture and infrastructure in NYC. You can already feel a nostalgic notion to his works at his time, today they are a clear reminder of how fast this city was and is always changing.

Karin Petit

Zhao Zhao
In Extremis No.14
Tang Contemporary Art
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Zhao Zhao, In Extremis No.14 (2018). Courtesy of Tang Contemporary Art.

Zhao Zhao, In Extremis No.14 (2018). Courtesy of Tang Contemporary Art.

From the young Chinese conceptual artist Zhao Zhao’s “In Extremis” series, this artwork was inspired by the remains of a cat the artist observed dead on a street in Beijing. All that was left on the ground, when the artist came upon the cat’s body, was a vague contour rolled out like a small carpet. In this artwork, the artist attempts to create a salient contrast between the once iridescent yet ephemeral life and the cold harsh asphalt of a man-made civilization. The work compels the audience to face the miseries that truly existed and rethink the triviality of individual lives, even when they’ve become only glittering vestiges. 

Yi Zhang

Jonathan Shearer
After the rain, Buachaille Etive Mor
Artistics
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Jonathan Shearer, After the rain, Buachaille Etive Mor (2019). Courtesy of Artistics.

Jonathan Shearer, After the rain, Buachaille Etive Mor (2019). Courtesy of Artistics.

Artist Jonathan Shearer paints seascapes and landscapes that are like updated visions of J.M.W. Turner. A tumultuous sky signals that a storm is gathering over a moody autumnal terrain.

 Tara Wyant

 


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