8 Artworks From Artnet’s Gallery Network That Our Experts Are Loving This Week

Each week, our gallery liaisons share their favorite works from the Artnet Gallery Network.

David Shrigley, To Hell With Zoos (2021). Courtesy of Dominic Guerrini Fine Art.
David Shrigley, To Hell With Zoos (2021). Courtesy of Dominic Guerrini Fine Art.

Every week, we explore the thousands of galleries on the Artnet Gallery Network to highlight the spaces and artworks inspiring us right now. Take a look at our latest picks below.

 

Nnamdi Okonkwo
Celebration
Guarisco Gallery
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Nnamdi Okonkwo, Celebration. Courtesy of Guarisco Gallery.

Nnamdi Okonkwo, Celebration. Courtesy of Guarisco Gallery.

Nnamdi Okonkwo, a Nigerian-born American sculptor, depicts bold female forms in his joyful works. As the spring season kicks into gear and as vaccine distribution increases, Celebration encapsulates the dynamic energy of this moment in time through the movement of dance. 

—Carson Wos

 

 

Carlos Colín
Uey Citlalin (Estrella Grande/Big Start) (Syncretic Study)
Fazakas Gallery
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Carlos Colín, Uey Citlalin (Estrella Grande/Big Start) (Syncretic Study) (2020). Courtesy of Fazakas Gallery.

Carlos Colín, Uey Citlalin (Estrella Grande/Big Start) (Syncretic Study) (2020). Courtesy of Fazakas Gallery.

This embroidered felt work by Mexican artist Carlos Colín might look like a Pokeball at first glance but it’s actually of a “citlalin” or star in the ancient language of Nahuatl. The gold thread against the dark chestnut background is further accentuated by the illusion of glare around each ray of light — a very captivating detail that is also used to fill in the star.

—Cristina Cruz

 

Marcello Morandini
Wall Sculpture 97C
Galerie Kellermann
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Marcello Morandini, Wall Sculpture 97C. Courtesy of Gallerie Kellermann. 

Marcello Morandini, Wall Sculpture 97C. Courtesy of Galerie Kellermann.

Marcello Morandini’s Wall Sculpture 97C explores linear form within the grid, creating a hypnotic geometric field for the eye to explore. This large-scale wall sculpture invites the viewer to get entangled within its mathematical web.

—Gillian Ochoa

Cecil Touchon
PDP1135
JF Gallery
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Cecil Touchon, PDP1135 (2020). Courtesy of JF Gallery,

Cecil Touchon, PDP1135 (2020). Courtesy of JF Gallery.

Cecil Touchon’s work is grounded in the modernist tradition of abstraction. His collaged paintings take elements from landscapes, architecture, and typography found on billboards and printed materials which he deconstructs into abstracted, geometric shapes. The careful layering of these shapes creates a unique visual language for Touchon.

—Gretchen Cline

 

Dan Rizzie
Untitled
Tatum Art Advisory
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Dan Rizzie, Untitled (2015). Courtesy of Tatum Art Advisory.

Dan Rizzie, Untitled (2015). Courtesy of Tatum Art Advisory.

This work’s black-and-white bold abstractions capture Dan Rizzie’s typical style of bold graphic images derived from nature. 

—Karin Petit

 

Laura Ford
Squid Kids
Galerie Scheffel
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Laura Ford, Squid Kids. Courtesy of Scheffel.

Laura Ford, Squid Kids. Courtesy of Galerie Scheffel.

Whether the two children in the drawing have slipped on a squid costume or are transforming into actual octopuses is unclear. Laura Ford’s figures are mostly peculiar chimeras with treetops growing out of their heads, or whose larger-than-life cat paws reveal human hands with five fingers. She creates a world that oscillates between fantasy and nightmare. Her hybrid creatures arouse the viewer’s curiosity and at the same time challenge, even overtax, him or her through their concise figurativeness. I am intrigued by the openness, indeed the almost transparency of the two delicate figures, which lure the viewer with the promise of revealing their innermost composition, which Ford, of course, ultimately does not grant.

—Miriam Minak

 

Chester Higgins Jr.
ETHIOPIA: Morning Chore
Bill Hodges
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Chester Higgins, ETHIOPIA: Morning Chore (1989). Courtesy of Bill Hodges.

Chester Higgins Jr., ETHIOPIA: Morning Chore (1989). Courtesy of Bill Hodges.

The legendary Chester Higgins Jr., known for his over four-decade tenure as a staff photographer at the New York Times, created beautiful images of the life and culture of people of the African diaspora. In this work, Higgins has rendered a portrait of an Ethiopian woman in the midst of her “morning chore.” The composition and subject matter is very reminiscent of a Vermeer painting, with soft light streaming on the woman from a single window. 

—Qadira Farrington

David Shrigley
The World
RAW Editions
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David Shrigley, The World (2020). Courtesy of Raw Editions.

David Shrigley, The World (2020). Courtesy of RAW Editions.

After the events of the past year and the many confident (and totally wrong) predictions that life would soon return to normal, we’ve given up even trying to guess what’s around the corner. David Shrigley’s art reminds us that it’s always best to face events with humor and a willingness to adapt. 

—Sara Carson


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