10 Artworks From Artnet’s Gallery Network That Our Experts Are Loving This Week

Each week, our gallery liaisons share their favorite works from the Artnet Gallery Network.

Los Bravú, Equestrian Portrait in Gandiol (2020). Courtesy of Lyle O. Reitzel.
Los Bravú, Equestrian Portrait in Gandiol (2020). Courtesy of Lyle O. Reitzel.

Every week, we explore the thousands of galleries on the Artnet Gallery Network to highlight the spaces and artworks inspiring us right now. Take a look at our latest picks below.

Peter Ryan
Man on an Elephant
AppleX Art
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Peter Ryan, Man on an Elephant (2019). Courtesy of AppleX Art.

Peter Ryan, Man on an Elephant (2019). Courtesy of AppleX Art.

Based in Perth, Australia, Peter Ryan specializes in oil paintings and pencil drawings, but he has a background in animation and scriptwriting. He enjoys incorporating his passion for storytelling into his artworks, and his works always seem to bear traces of animated narratives. Man on an Elephant was inspired by the picturesque landscapes of Australia, to which Ryan has infused life through the addition of his fisherman character. The work encourages us to contemplate the relationship between nature and humans, and how to achieve a beautiful equilibrium. The work radiates a liveliness that offers viewers a breath of fresh air so that we could take our mind off the current situation, and appreciate nature for what it endows.   

—Yi Zhang

Henri Charles Manguin
Après le bain, Jeanne à Saint Tropez
Helene Bailly Gallery
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Henri Charles Manguin, Après le bain, Jeanne à Saint Tropez (1907). Courtesy of Helene Bailly Gallery .

Henri Charles Manguin, Après le bain, Jeanne à Saint Tropez (1907). Courtesy of Helene Bailly Gallery.

In this painting, Henri Charles Manguin employs key elements of Fauvism in his interpretation of a woman standing nude amid lush green surroundings. Manguin uses strong colors and tones as a means of expressing his emotions while highlighting the beauty of nature and the human form.

— Nan Stewart

Los Bravú
Albina
Lyle O. Reitzel
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Los Bravú, Albina (2020). Courtesy of Lyle O. Reitzel.

Los Bravú, Albina (2020). Courtesy of Lyle O. Reitzel.

Artist-duo Los Bravu are known for using disparate iconography in their fun portraits and street scenes. The images are surreal and often pastoral while nevertheless mixing in tech objects and other Millenial tropes. Albina is fashionable, reminiscent of girls making a move in the social media modeling scene with their unique and inclusive looks. Of course,  it might also remind us of the moment’s necessary quarantine selfies. 

—Santiago Garcia Cano

Chelsea Velaga
Mudra 1
Channel To Channel
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Chelsea Velaga, Mudra 1 (2019). Courtesy of Channel To Channel.

Chelsea Velaga, Mudra 1 (2019). Courtesy of Channel To Channel.

The “Mudra” series by illustrator Chelsea Velaga are delicate yet empowering depictions of female hands engaged in symbolic hand gestures used in Hindu and Buddhist ceremonies and Indian dance. The red ink on wax adds a vintage feel to the work, which could easily be imagined as a tattoo design.

—Cristina Cruz

Tom Fairs
Untitled
Van Doren Waxter
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Tom Fairs, Untitled (1990–1999). Courtesy of Van Doren Waxter.

Tom Fairs, Untitled (1990–1999). Courtesy of Van Doren Waxter.

Tom Fairs’ artworks are peaceful and tranquil landscape scenes delivered through his post-impressionist-style brushstrokes. These tranquil images are a welcome escape from our harsh reality and towards a more meditative state.

—Julia Yook

Hans Hartung
T1973-H1
Galerie Boulakia
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Hans Hartung, T1973-H1 (1973). Courtesy of Galerie Boulakia.

Hans Hartung, T1973-H1 (1973). Courtesy of Galerie Boulakia.

In this time of self-isolation, I am particularly drawn to works like T1973-H1. The work’s “dark vs. light” or “color vs. obscurity” tension feels appropriate as everyone navigates this time, going back and forth between panic and calm, sadness and happiness, etc.

—Tara Wyant

Bernard Frize
Bachi
Simon Lee
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Bernard Frize, Bachi (2019). Courtesy of Simon Lee.

Bernard Frize, Bachi (2019). Courtesy of Simon Lee.

In this work brush marks and variations in pressure and speed on the painted surface achieve a surprising unpredictability, opening up the exploration of line and color to new alternatives. Tracing patterns of interconnected and alternating gestures, each loaded with a different hue, a sequence of movements is executed, and results in interlocking, overlapping grids, and basket-like woven patterns. This action together with the resin creates shades in the paint and thins the consistency, producing a smooth and flat surface.

—Sara Carson

 

Francis Newton Souza
European Cityscape
F.N.Souza International Fine Arts Foundation & Family Trust Inc.
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Francis Newton Souza, European Cityscape (1961). Courtesy of F.N.Souza International Fine Arts Foundation & Family Trust Inc.


Francis Newton Souza, European Cityscape (1961). Courtesy of F.N.Souza International Fine Arts Foundation & Family Trust Inc.

I enjoy the form and colors of this work as they evoke the feeling of a busy city through very abstract imagery.

—Neha Jambhekar

Kenneth Young
Untitled
Edward Tyler Nahem
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Kenneth Young, Untitled (1968). Courtesy of Edward Tyler Nahem.

Kenneth Young, Untitled (1968). Courtesy of Edward Tyler Nahem.

During this lifetime the late artist Kenneth Young spent the majority of his career on the outside of the mainstream art world as a member of the Washington Color School. In more recent years, Young’s works have been receiving long-overdue attention for their colorful, hypnotizing depictions of nature.

—Karin Petit

Nick Brandt
Lion Before Storm V
Camera Work
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Nick Brandt, Lion Before Storm V (2006). Courtesy of Camera Work.

Nick Brandt, Lion Before Storm V (2006). Courtesy of Camera Work.

This is one of my favorite photographs by Nick Brandt. The lion waits serenely for a storm as if nothing in the world could happen to him. His elegance and strength are admirable. More, equally captivating works by Nick Brandt are available on Camera Work website.

—Alexandra Schott


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