7 Artworks From Artnet’s Gallery Network That Our Experts Are Loving This Week

Each week, our gallery liaisons share their favorite works from the Artnet Gallery Network.

Alfredo Srur, Carlitos Early Morning. Courtesy of Galerie Julian Sander.
Alfredo Srur, Carlitos Early Morning. Courtesy of Galerie Julian Sander.

Every week, we explore the thousands of galleries on the Artnet Gallery Network to highlight the spaces and artworks inspiring us right now. Take a look at our latest picks below.

Michael Alan
Feel the Bern
Galerie Bruno Massa
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Michael Alan, Feel the Bern (2021). Courtesy of Galerie Bruno Massa.

Michael Alan, Feel the Bern (2021). Courtesy of Galerie Bruno Massa.

As the winter weather kicks into full force, let’s take a page from Bernie Sanders’ inauguration wardrobe. Michael Alan’s detailed drawing style adds whimsy and a fresh feel to Sander’s now-famous textiles, which were themselves caught up in their own sensational meme storm.

—Carson Wos

Jorge Salas
Niña con Cesta de Flores
Soraya Cartategui Fine Art
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Jorge Salas, Niña con Cesta de Flores. Courtesy of Soraya Cartategui Fine Art.

Jorge Salas, Niña con Cesta de Flores. Courtesy of Soraya Cartategui Fine Art.

What I love about this colorful acrylic work by Dominican artist Jorge Salas is the girl’s confident pose along with the echoing of texture between the Pointillist background, the bouquet of flowers, and the girl’s hair puffs. By contrast, her skin is smooth and her clothing (likely a school uniform) looks freshly ironed.

—Cristina Cruz

Suchitra Mattai
Lost and Found in a Tale So Sweet
Hollis Taggart
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Suchitra Mattai, Lost and Found in a Tale So Sweet (2020). Courtesy of Hollis Taggart.

Suchitra Mattai, Lost and Found in a Tale So Sweet (2020). Courtesy of Hollis Taggart.

Suchitra Mattai’s Lost and Found in a Tale So Sweet ebbs and flows in its textures and colors made from vintage saris and found objects and mirrors the body and movement. Like the title of this work, the rhythm of this piece pulls you in like a condensed poem that you repeat in your head for hours.

—Gillian Ochoa

 

Mobina Nouri
Freedom (Free Them)
ADVOCARTSY
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Mobina Nouri, Freedom (Free Them) (2019). Courtesy of ADVOCARTSY.

Mobina Nouri, Freedom (Free Them) (2019). Courtesy of ADVOCARTSY.

The pursuit of knowledge can on the one hand elevate but on the other hand constrain. This image combines both these feelings, as the female form tries to break free of this cloak-like script that covers her body. 

—Karin Petit

 

Alfredo Srur
Isra’s Birthday
Galerie Julian Sander
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Alfredo Srur, Isra's Birthday. Courtesy of Galerie Julian Sander.

Alfredo Srur, Isra’s Birthday. Courtesy of Galerie Julian Sander.

This work by the Argentine photographer Alfredo Srur is part of his series “Heridas” (“Wounds”), which he made in San Fernando, a suburb of Buenos Aires. In the series, he deals with the complex and challenging life circumstances of the locals while casting an unembellished, yet respectful gaze on those portrayed.

Besides the social ills, injustices, and violent elements, Srur also succeeds in capturing lightheartedness and cohesion in everyday life or familiar moments within a friendship, as seen here in a touching way. He catches the two young men in an intimate moment, focuses the whole scene on their close bond, and for a second, he lets the surroundings fade away completely.

—Miriam Minak

Peter Alexander
Glendale VIII
Art Resource Group
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Peter Alexander, Glendale VIII (1989). Courtesy of Art Resource Group.

Peter Alexander, Glendale VIII (1989). Courtesy of Art Resource Group.

Peter Alexander was an American sculptor who in his later years took to painting landscapes and skylines of Los Angeles. At first glance, this print simply looks like a black and blue abstract work but then you realize that this is an aerial shot of the Glendale neighborhood in LA. I really like the color palette and that this work can easily be mistaken for tie-dye fabric.
—Neha Jambhekar

Richard Hambleton
Horse and Rider
Woodbury House
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Richard Hambleton, Horse and Rider (2020). Courtesy of Woodbury House.

Richard Hambleton, Horse and Rider (2020). Courtesy of Woodbury House.

Richard Hambleton was one of the first urban artists, working in the East Village of New York alongside Haring and Basquiat. His figures on horseback are dark and disturbing twists on the iconic American cowboy.
—Sara Carson


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