7 Artworks From Artnet’s Gallery Network That Our Experts Are Loving This Week

Each week, our gallery liaisons share their favorite works from the Artnet Gallery Network.

Raymond Jonson. Watercolor No.8 Sequence—A Trilogy—First Vista (1948). Courtesy of Addison Rowe Gallery.

Every week, we explore the thousands of galleries on the Artnet Gallery Network to highlight the spaces and artworks inspiring us right now. Take a look at our latest picks below.

Barbara Ellmerer
Lockdown-Bouquet
Galerie Andres Thalmann
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Barbara Ellmerer, Lockdown-Bouquet (2020). Courtesy of Galerie Andres Thalmann.

Barbara Ellmerer, Lockdown-Bouquet (2020). Courtesy of Galerie Andres Thalmann.

During the lockdown, Swiss artist Barbara Ellmerer has transformed the classic genre of floral still life in brilliant reinterpretations. The bouquet of flowers is no longer statically bound to a place but seems to explode out of itself as blossoms and buds race through the room. Abstraction and figuration mix into an expressive blaze of form and color. 

—Alexandra Schott

 

Hedda Schattanik and Roman Szczesny
David gegen Goliath
Sies + Höke Galerie
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Hedda Schattanik and Roman Szczesny, David gegen Goliath (2019). Courtesy of Sies + Höke Galerie.

Hedda Schattanik and Roman Szczesny, David gegen Goliath (2019). Courtesy of Sies + Höke Galerie.

This epic piece by German artist duo Hedda Schattanik and Roman Szczesny makes me imagine a blacklight rave at a museum. A giant head of a statue is splattered in slime and tagged with neon blue writing. Angels and birds fly above, escaping an explosion in the distance. Monotone nude sketches float in a photorealistic Martian landscape. The resulting artwork is the perfect inspiration for a post quarantine fête.

—Cristina Cruz

 

Delphin Enjolras
Resting Odalisque
Galerie Ary Jan
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Delphin Enjolras, Resting Odalisque. Courtesy of Galerie Ary Jan.

Delphin Enjolras, Resting Odalisque. Courtesy of Galerie Ary Jan.

The motif of the Odalisque has a long tradition in art history. Famous examples like The Grand Odalisque (1814) by Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres and Olympia (1863) by Edouard Manet have archetypes in even earlier works of Titian’s Venus of Urbino (1534) and Giorgione’s Dresden Venus (1510—11). However, it is especially the 19th century with its artistic movement of Orientalism that brings the pictorial representation of the exoticized and eroticized Odalisque to its height. 

French academic painter Delphin Enjolras joins this long tradition with his Resting Odalisque, with his subject reclining amid a fiery red interior of cushions, drapes, and ornamental tapestry. The dominating red palette resonates with the shimmery red skin of the odalisque making her seem to glow from inside. As it is often the case in the depiction of nudes, some little accessories like the transparent foulard raped around the odalisque’s legs accentuate the naked body even more and intensify the sensual and carnal appearance of the female body, making this painting a very lustful example of its genre. 

—Elmas Senol

 

Libby Schoettle
There is Still Art, There is Still Hope
West Chelsea Contemporary
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Libby Schoettle, There is Still Art, There is Still Hope (2020). Courtesy of West Chelsea Contemporary.

Libby Schoettle, There is Still Art, There is Still Hope (2020). Courtesy of West Chelsea Contemporary.

The artist Libby Schoettle, whose alter-ego is called PhoebeNewYork, makes collages out of fashion imagery, found objects, and words. The images reflect on struggles with femininity and sexual politics that so many of us experience. 

—Karin Petit

 

Slawomir Elsner
From the Series Just Watercolors (061)
Lullin + Ferrari
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Slawomir Elsner, From the Series Just Watercolors (061). Courtesy of Lullin + Ferrari.

Slawomir Elsner, From the Series Just Watercolors (061). Courtesy of Lullin + Ferrari.

This artwork transports me out of my body for a moment; I find myself falling into the hazy, deep red, and wading through the shifting violet hues into the saturated blue border. I believe these moments of transporting out of the mundane and into experiences of art are more important now than ever, as all of us have to stay at home.

—Gillian Ochoa

 

Raymond Johnson
Casein Tempera No. 4
Addison Rowe Gallery
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Raymond Johnson, Casein Tempera No. 4 (1942). Courtesy of Addison Rowe Gallery.

Raymond Johnson, Casein Tempera No. 4 (1942). Courtesy of Addison Rowe Gallery.

Mid-century American artist Raymond Johnson played with color and form to create visually enticing works. The hazy quality of the curvilinear form gives this modern work on paper a very contemporary quality, making it seem way ahead of its time.

—Neha Jambhekar

 

Adam Green
Bad Nut
S&P
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Adam Green, Bad Nut (S&P). Courtesy of S&P.

Adam Green, Bad Nut. Courtesy of S&P.

American musician Adam Green also works as a visual artist, playing off familiar logos by mixing them with unexpected colors and patterns and his own fantastic cityscapes. 

—Sara Carson


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