11 Artworks From Artnet’s Gallery Network That Our Experts Are Loving This Week

Each week, our gallery liaisons share their favorite works from the Artnet Gallery Network.

Augusto Esquivel, Framed Flowers (2018). Courtesy of Art N Folly.
Augusto Esquivel, Framed Flowers (2018). Courtesy of Art N Folly.

Every week, we explore the thousands of galleries on the Artnet Gallery Network to highlight the spaces and artworks inspiring us right now. Take a look at our latest picks below.

 

Albana Ejupi
A Speech Between Me and Myself
Lukas Feichtner Galerie
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Albana Ejupi, A Speech Between Me and Myself I (2019). Courtesy of Lukas Feichtner Galerie.

Albana Ejupi, A Speech Between Me and Myself I (2020). Courtesy of Lukas Feichtner Galerie.

The oeuvre of the young Kosovar artist Albana Ejupi revolves around the human experience “I want to understand what it means to be human,” she has said. In this painting, she engages in a confrontation with herself during the coronavirus lockdown.
— Alexandra Schott

Swoon
Alixa and Naima
Audrey Hatchikian Gallery
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Swoon, Alixa and Naima. Courtesy of Audrey Hatchikian Gallery.

Swoon, Alixa and Naima. Courtesy of Audrey Hatchikian Gallery.

In this work, Swoon captures the poetic duo of Alixa Garcia and Naima Penniman. The spoken-word poets perform together under the name of Climbing PoeTree and their work focuses on bringing awareness to social issues, identity politics, and the environmental justice movement. I discovered their practice through this Swoon work — and I want to share their talents to a wider audience. 

—Carson Wos

Stefano Cerio
Aquila 3
The Pool NYC
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Stefano Cerio, Aquila 3 (2019). Courtesy of The Pool NYC.

Stefano Cerio, Aquila 3 (2019). Courtesy of The Pool NYC.

Italian photographer Stefano Cerio has been said to depict “the staging of a possible reality that might not be true but is at least plausible.” In this photograph, an inflatable children’s slide sits in an incongruously empty field on a foggy day. The bright colors of the inflatable slide pop against the dreary landscape — the effect is unnerving and feels like a scene from a horror movie, but one I’d really like to watch. 

—Cristina Cruz

Edouard Taufenbach
Jeux d’eau
Elizabeth Houston
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Edouard Taufenbach, Jeux d'eau (2019). Courtesy of Elizabeth Houston.

Edouard Taufenbach, Jeux d’eau (2019). Courtesy of Elizabeth Houston.

In 2012, director Sébastien Lifshitz debuted his documentary Les Invisibles which told the story of eleven French people from the LGBTQ+ community now all over 70 years of age. Photographic artist Edouard Taubfenbach has repurposed archival imagery from that pivotal documentary — which he stretches, distorts, and repeats to bring a pulsing sense of movement and life to their experiences. 

—Julia Yook

DAZE
The Subterraneans
Museum of Graffiti
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DAZE, The Subterraneans (2019). Courtesy of the Museum of Graffiti.

DAZE, The Subterraneans (2019). Courtesy of the Museum of Graffiti.

A street art pioneer, DAZE started his career painting subway cars in the 1970s— and though it has been a while since he used subway cars as his canvas, in this work he circles back to his youthful beginnings.

—Karin Petit

Radka Bodzevič Doubravová
Balloon
Arcimboldo Gallery
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Radka Bodzevič Doubravová, Balloon (2020). Courtesy of Arcimboldo.

Radka Bodzevič Doubravová, Balloon (2020). Courtesy of Arcimboldo.

I particularly like the complexity and surprise effects of Radka Bodzevič Doubravová’s oeuvre. What at first glance looks like a clearly recognizable structure, on closer inspection turns out to be an enigmatic work with many fascinating layers. 

The gigantic balloon hovering over pitch-black ground seems to have literally swallowed its occupants who appear to float about inside the balloon and no basket can be found. And looking more closely, who is the central figure around whom the other figures swarm? The balloon’s pilot or a veritable heavenly figure? Only the artist herself is left with the answer.

—Miriam Minak

Pablo Picasso
Paysage Méditerranéen or Anthropomorphe
Bailly Gallery Paris
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Pablo Picasso, Paysage méditerranéen or anthropomorphe. Courtesy of Bailly Gallery Paris.

Pablo Picasso, Paysage méditerranéen or anthropomorphe. Courtesy of Bailly Gallery Paris.

The anthropomorphic element of this landscape is represented by a hidden profile at the center of the hills. The prominent features of the profile match those found in many of Picasso’s later self-portraits, which may indicate that this profile belongs to the artist himself. In his landscapes, Picasso often depicted scenery and views that were personally significant, and in painting himself into this work, the artist solidifies the importance of this particular view.

— Nan Stewart

Sophie von Hellerman
The Course of True Love
Pilar Corrias
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Sophie von Hellerman, The Course of True Love (2020). Courtesy of Pilar Corrias.

Sophie von Hellerman, The Course of True Love (2020). Courtesy of Pilar Corrias.

Sophie von Hellerman’s paintings bring viewers into the dreamy world of her imagination. I love the colors of this painting especially — the blues and the purples that transport you in what seems to be a late-night bacchanal in the middle of the woods.

—Neha Jambhekar

Augusto Esquivel
Vase with Flowers
Art N Folly
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Augusto Esquivel, Vase with Flowers (2020). Courtesy of Art N Folly.

Augusto Esquivel, Vase with Flowers (2020). Courtesy of Art N Folly.

Esquivel’s wall sculptures are curious still lifes made from a variety of fun buttons. His use of space and understanding of perception allows his works to be enjoyed from numerous sightlines. For instance, in this work, the flowers appear cartoonish up-front, abstract three-dimensional forms from the side, and a full of detail up-close. His works touch many sensibilities through their kitsch/pop subjects, craftsmanship, and photogenic impact.

—Santiago Garcia Cano

Maurice de Vlaminck
Village près de la Rivière
Willow Gallery
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Maurice de Vlaminck, Village près de la Rivière (2019). Courtesy of Willow Gallery.

Maurice de Vlaminck, Village près de la Rivière. Courtesy of Willow Gallery.

The French painter Maurice de Vlaminck was one of the founders of the Fauvist group, a group of artists whose works were defined by their intense and unexpected colors. He took great inspiration from Cézanne and his influence can be seen in this painting of elegant trees reaching upwards, and in the deep green foliage and red-roofed buildings. 

—Sara Carson

William Kentridge
The Passion of Mrs. Eckstein
Sylvan Cole Gallery
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William Kentridge, The Passion of Mrs Eckstein from "Sobriety, Obesity & Growing Old" (1991). Courtesy of Sylvan Cole Gallery.


William Kentridge, The Passion of Mrs.Eckstein from “Sobriety, Obesity & Growing Old” series (1991). Courtesy of Sylvan Cole Gallery.

The spectacular drawing comes from “Sobriety, Obesity and Growing Old” — Kentridge’s fourth (and some would say best) film. This drawing appears from 4:51 to 4:56. The numerous drawings, erasures, and reworkings integral to Kentridge’s filmmaking method have agitated the surface of the paper considerably, making it three-dimensional.

At one point Kentridge wore a tiny hole through the paper and repaired it himself. Overall in excellent condition, this drawing comes from the collection of one of the earliest collectors of Kentridge’s work, who recognized the artist’s importance long before he became famous. Sylvan Cole gallery, who is offering the work, specializes in early works by Kentridge.

—Yi Zhang


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