7 Artworks From Artnet’s Gallery Network That Our Experts Are Loving This Week

Each week, our gallery liaisons share their favorite works from the Artnet Gallery Network.

Philippe Ramette, Untitled (2015). Courtesy of Xippas Gallery.
Philippe Ramette, Untitled (2015). Courtesy of Xippas Gallery.

Every week, we explore the thousands of galleries on the Artnet Gallery Network to highlight the spaces and artworks inspiring us right now. Take a look at our latest picks below.

 

Peter Max
Black Series: Vase Of Flowers IV VER.VI #1
Peter Max Studio
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Peter Max, Black Series:Vase Of Flowers IV VER.Vi #1. Courtesy of Peter Max Studio.

Peter Max, Black Series: Vase Of Flowers IV VER.VI #1. Courtesy of Peter Max Studio.

German pop-artist, Peter Max, uses bright colors and painterly strokes to paint everyday subjects. This painting plays with the conventions of a floral still life through an unusual angle and dark background, which makes the flowers appear like explosions in space.

—Neha Jambhekar

Stik
Liberty (Blue)
The Artmarket Gallery
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Stik, Liberty (Blue) (2013). Courtesy of The Artmarket Gallery.

Stik, Liberty (Blue) (2013). Courtesy of The Artmarket Gallery.

The British street artist Stik wants people to know that he works responsibly, always getting permission from property owners and returning to maintain his outdoor artworks. If you love his characteristic stick figures but aren’t lucky enough to own a building in graffiti-centric Shoreditch this screenprint is the next best thing and won’t need lots of maintenance! 

—Sara Carson

Julie Umerle
Split Infinity
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Julie Umerle, Split Infinity (2017). Courtesy of Julie Umerle.

Julie Umerle, Split Infinity (2017). Courtesy of Julie Umerle.

Split Infinity is geometric and hard-edged, but also contains free-flowing areas where rivulets of paint cascade down the surface of the painting. The canvas is a divided field of blue and green, using soft similar tones as a ground for geometric shapes.

–Yi Zhang

Chiho Aoshima
Japanese Apricot 3 – A Pink Dream
Elizabeth Clement Contemporary
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Chiho Aoshima, Japanese Apricot 3 — A Pink Dream (2007). Courtesy of Elizabeth Clement Contemporary.

Chiho Aoshima, Japanese Apricot 3 — A Pink Dream (2007). Courtesy of Elizabeth Clement Contemporary.

Chiho Aoshima surreal landscapes often include ghosts, demons, and shojo, a teenage-girl character popular in anime culture. By adding these strange distortions and uncomfortable elements, the artist challenges the cuteness of the objectified shojo, placing her in a landscape that’s more akin to the visions of Hieronymous Bosch.

—Karin Petit

Theodore Seuss Geisel
Semi Normal Green Lidded Fawn
Oliver Cole Gallery
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Theodore Seuss Geisel, Semi Normal Green Lidded Fawn. Courtesy of Oliver Cole Gallery.

Theodore Seuss Geisel, Semi Normal Green Lidded Fawn. Courtesy of Oliver Cole Gallery.

This sculpture by Theodore Seuss Geisel (better known as Dr. Seuss) of a Semi Normal Green Lidded Fawn is the perfect double-take. The not as “out there” as most of the imaginative creatures in his work, this sculpture is discreet enough to hang in a cabin and then subtly freak out your friends when they take a closer look. 

—Cristina Cruz

Philippe Ramette
Eloge du pas de côté
Xippas
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Philippe Ramette, Eloge du pas de côté (2018). Courtesy of Xippas.

Philippe Ramette, Eloge du pas de côté (2018). Courtesy of Xippas.

In this photograph, a suited figure stands, overlooking a river, with one foot on a rock, the other foot hanging in the air. From the angle of the photo, the foot in the air appears as though it’s suspended precariously above historical spires on the other side of the river, while new construction takes place nearby the figure. This surreal scene, replete with Magritte-style clouds, underscores the fiction within the pristine ideal of place, versus the reality of its current mode of existence. The suited man — an emblem of business — suspended in this moment of tension seems to speak to negotiations between traditional and contemporary modes of urban labor. 

—Carson Wos

Tim Okamura
The Parlor
Sakhile & Me
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Tim Okamura, The Parlor (2019). Courtesy of the Sakhile & Me.

Tim Okamura, The Parlor (2019). Courtesy of the Sakhile&Me.

Here, a calm, poised woman sits drinking tea — the Canadian painter Tim Okamura has depicted the designer Paola Mathé at home in her own peaceful paradise, surrounded by plants and butterflies fluttering around. What is striking is the delicacy with which details are captured, such as the dress or the pattern of the teacup. The background, on the other hand, seems to melt away in some parts. Is this, in combination with her pensive gaze, a reference to the transience of the paradise? The painting is currently on view in “Figures” an exhibition at  Sakhile&Me Gallery in Frankfurt am Main.

–Alexandra Schott


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