8 Artworks From Artnet’s Gallery Network That Our Experts Are Loving This Week

Each week, our gallery liaisons share their favorite works from the Artnet Gallery Network.

Peter Uka, Ocho-Yama, Refill (2019). Courtesy of Galerie Voss,
Peter Uka, Ocho-Yama, Refill (2019). Courtesy of Galerie Voss,

Every week, we explore the thousands of galleries on the Artnet Gallery Network to highlight the spaces and artworks inspiring us right now. Take a look at our latest picks below.

Jeff Koons
Gazing Ball (Wheatfield Cypresses)
Richard Levy
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Jeff Koons, Gazing Ball (Wheatfield Cypresses) (2017). Courtesy of Richard Levy.

Jeff Koons, Gazing Ball (Wheatfield Cypresses) (2017). Courtesy of Richard Levy.

Jeff Koons is one of the most influential artists of the contemporary art era. In this image, the artist placed a small blue reflective sphere on Van Gogh’s masterpiece Wheatfield With Cypresses — the sphere refracts viewers’ gazes and allows them to appreciate both the contemporary and Impressionist era at once. 

—Julia Yook

Frida Orupabo
Untitled
Gavin Brown’s enterprise
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Frida Orupabo, Untitled (2020). Courtesy of Gavin Brown's enterprise.

Frida Orupabo, Untitled (2020). Courtesy of Gavin Brown’s enterprise.

Frida Orupabo’s work consists of digital and physical collages made in various forms. The unusual composite bodies she creates explore questions related to body identity. 

—Karin Petit

Peter Uka
o.T.
Galerie Voss
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Peter Uka, o.T. (2018). Courtesy of Galerie Voss.

Peter Uka, o.T. (2018). Courtesy of Galerie Voss.

 

The works of the painter Peter Uka are usually bursting with details and create a setting in which viewers can lose themselves. His compositions, nevertheless, have always shown clear structures, colors, and forms, which embed his subjects in an everyday narrative. In the painting here, however, he lifts the three portrayed women out of their context and unexpectedly further strengthens their presence. No background or objects distract from the group and the viewer can easily establish a direct connection with them.

— Miriam Minak

Jane Harris
Playing Putti
CLOSE Ltd
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Jane Harris, Playing Putti (2018). Courtesy of CLOSE Ltd.

Jane Harris, Playing Putti (2018). Courtesy of CLOSE Ltd.

British artist Jane Harris plays with shapes, particularly the ellipse, in her geometrically themed works. The closely arranged shapes, as well as the muted color-scheme in this work, end up having an impact instead of seeming passive, which really speaks to me.

— Neha Jambhekar

Bea Bonafini
Looking Forbackward
El Jundi Art Gallery
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Bea Bonafini, Looking Forbackward (2019). Courtesy of El Jundi Art Gallery. 

Bea Bonafini, Looking Forbackward (2019). Courtesy of El Jundi Art Gallery.

Bonafini’s textile-based works mesmerize through her amplification of the realms of painting and sculpture in her 3D carpeted forms. Her works are often images of amalgamated bodies creating connections between the labor of textiles, feminine communities, and contemporary abstract design. Looking Forbackward is a poetic work, blending silhouettes with opposing dark and light tones. 

—Santiago Garcia Cano 

Iryna Gavryliv
Guelder Rose
Galleria Balmain
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Iryna Gavryliv, Guelder Rose (2019). Courtesy of Galleria Balmain.

Iryna Gavryliv, Guelder Rose (2019). Courtesy of Galleria Balmain.

I love this dreamy, romantic depiction of a young girl in her garden, lost in thought, with a garland of vivid green leaves and bright red berries crowning her head.

—Sara Carson

Wang Jiajia
You’ve Reached the End
SPURS Gallery
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Wang Jiajia, You’ve Reached the End (2020). Courtesy of SPURS Gallery.

Wang Jiajia, You’ve Reached the End (2020). Courtesy of SPURS Gallery.

At the center of the painting, we see a pair of wide cartoon eyes. The eyes are those of villains from twentieth-century cartoons and anime. The artist’s appropriation has turned the viewer and viewed power-dynamic on its head as he consciously selects readymade images. The technique creates a narrative process that unfolds around the ubiquitous digital images of the contemporary landscape, presenting us with a psychic constellation of different cultures intersecting amidst conflicting elements of popular culture and the classical canon. 

—Yi Zhang

 

Raphael Egil
Zwei Bäume nach Kirchner
Michael Werner Kunsthandel
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Raphael Egil, Zwei Bäume nach Kirchner (2019). Courtesy Michael Werner Kunsthandel.

Raphael Egil, Zwei Bäume nach Kirchner (2019). Courtesy Michael Werner Kunsthandel.

Michael Werner Kunsthandel in Cologne is currently presenting new paintings by Swiss artist Raphael Egil. I especially like this painting with a blue tree and the white lines that structure the frame. A second tree might also be viewed too if seen from another perspective.

—Alexandra Schott


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