11 Artworks From Artnet’s Gallery Network That Our Experts Are Loving This Week

Each week, our gallery liaisons share their favorite works from the Artnet Gallery Network.

Feng Yan, Psychedelic Bamboo 20 (2011). Courtesy of Tang Contemporary Art.
Feng Yan, Psychedelic Bamboo 20 (2011). Courtesy of Tang Contemporary Art.

Every week, we explore the thousands of galleries on the Artnet Gallery Network to highlight the spaces and artworks inspiring us right now. Take a look at our latest picks below.

Anni Albers
Serie mit 6 Serigrafien
Edition Domberger
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Anni Albers, Serie mit 6 Serigrafien (1973). Courtesy of Edition Domberger.

Anni Albers, Serie mit 6 Serigrafien (1973). Courtesy of Edition Domberger.

This vibrant geometric work belongs to a series of six screen-prints made by Annie Albers from 1973. Albers started her career at the Bauhaus as a textile artist, the only workshop approved for women at the school. By the ’60s, she’d started experimenting with printing, especially lithography and screen printing. The beautiful patterns and strong colors are particularly appealing. Edition Domberger, the gallery offering this print, was founded in 1967 and specializes in graphic and artistic screen printing.

Alexandra Schott

Bex Massey
Looking For Up
House2Six
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Bex Massey, Looking For Up. Courtesy of House2Six.

Bex Massey, Looking For Up. Courtesy of House2Six.

This lush collage of cheetah print, pink tones, and snippets of Ancient Greek imagery is immediately eye-catching but the story behind the work makes adds new depth. The woman’s face depicted in the foreground is that of oft-disparaged Heather Mills, Paul McCartney’s ex-wife. The painting is based on a graphic novel titled Heather Lennon, which reimagines a narrative in which Heather attempted to marry John Lennon but was beaten to the chase by Yoko Ono, another Beatles wife fans love to hate. Massey aims to challenge the idea that women who are concerned with money, fame or power are, by necessity, bad.

Cristina Cruz

Jim Waid
Raspados
Bentley Gallery
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Jim Waid, Raspados (2019). Courtesy of Bentley Gallery.

Jim Waid, Raspados (2019). Courtesy of Bentley Gallery.

Jim Waid is an abstract artist who creates semi-organic, garden-like works in bright colors that pulsate with an interior rhythm and movement. Here, the artist creates an intricate and yet ambiguous floral scene.
Julia Yook

Mark Whitmarsh
Shellfish Bounty
Southwest Gallery
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Mark Whitmarsh, Shellfish Bounty. Courtesy of Southwest Gallery.

Mark Whitmarsh, Shellfish Bounty. Courtesy of Southwest Gallery.

This abstract colorful scene is like a dream of a bountiful of table setting resplendent with flowers, beautiful glassware, and dishes full of shellfish. It makes me want to have a lavish meal in a little fisherman’s village.
Karin Petit 

Sarah Loibl
Vier Möglichkeiten gegen eine Wand zu rennen
Daniel Marzona
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Sarah Loibl, Vier Möglichkeiten gegen eine Wand zu rennen (2017). Courtesy of Daniel Marzona.

Sarah Loibl, Vier Möglichkeiten gegen eine Wand zu rennen (2017). Courtesy of Daniel Marzona.

This four-part, larger-than-life work “Four Possibilities of Running into a Wall” tickles the imagination. Did four people actually jumping against a wall to provide a model for these paintings, we’re left to wonder. Beyond this definitely humorous component, it is the artist’s skill in subtly abstracting the depicted figures, as though in a quick motion, while retaining dynamic physicality that is most impressive.

Miriam Minak

Devorah Sperber
After the Mona Lisa 8
Gilles Clement Gallery
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Devorah Sperber, After the Mona Lisa 8 (2010). Courtesy Gilles Clement Gallery.

Devorah Sperber, After the Mona Lisa 8 (2010). Courtesy Gilles Clement Gallery.

Devorah Sperber’s explores the relationship between art, science, and technology. She creates sculptures assembled from thousands of ordinary objects to produce vaguely recognizable, pixelated, abstracted reproductions of Old Master paintings. In After the Mona Lisa 8, Sperber installs 1,482 spools of thread into what seems to be a random arrangement, then places a clear acrylic sphere in front of the work, which shrinks and condenses the thread spool “pixels” into a recognizable image while also rotating the imagery 180 degrees like the human eye. This awe-inspiring work puts a great emphasis on how little information the brain needs to make sense of imagery and how the eyes and brain prioritize what is subjective versus truth. This piece is currently on view at Gilles Clement Gallery through March 14th.

Qadira Farrington 

Paul Nicklen
Snowball Reverie
Hilton | Asmus Gallery
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Paul Nicklen, Snowball Reverie. Courtesy of Hilton | Amus Gallery.

Paul Nicklen, Snowball Reverie. Courtesy of Hilton | Asmus Gallery.

Wildlife photographer Paul Nicklen is set apart by his focus on marine biology. His snapshots are full of curiosity and enjoyable comedic moments. I think Snowball Reverie could easily be attached to a  “mood” tweet amidst an already troubling 2020.

Santiago Garcia Cano

Eugène Boudin
Sortie des Barques de Pêche
Stern Pissarro Gallery
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Eugène Boudin, Sortie des Barques de Pêche (1890). Courtesy of Stern Pissarro Gallery.

Eugène Boudin, Sortie des Barques de Pêche (1890). Courtesy of Stern Pissarro Gallery.

Boudin is the 19th century master of seascapes. His profound knowledge of the variations of color in sea and sky found along the French coastline are quietly revealed in the luminescent reflection on the waves and the dramatic, lavender billowing clouds.

Sara Carson

Teppei Ikehila
Hajimari
galerie bruno massa
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Teppei Ikehila, Hajimari (2012). Courtesy Galerie Bruno Massa.

Teppei Ikehila, Hajimari (2012). Courtesy galerie bruno massa.

Here we see an interior courtyard in which flowers and cacti bloom to surrealistic effect. The large blossoms floating at the top of the canvas have a Pop Art effect with hints of   Murakami or Warhol.

John Baldessari
Learn to Dream
Mai 36 Galerie
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John Baldessari, Learn to Dream (2011). Courtesy Mai 36 Galerie.

John Baldessari, Learn to Dream (2011). Courtesy Mai 36 Galerie.

 

This five-color screen-print in yellow, black, blue, light blue, and light yellow only reveals the different tones of blue with a closer glance. Baldessari was famous for using type and language to particular effect in his artwork to create with a wink of wit or mental surprise. The unexpected differences in color and the use of contrast and repetition cause the eye to move up and down repeatedly, creating the effect of a mantra and underlines the “learning” he asks us to undertake. 

Tobias Molitor

Feng Yan
Psychedelic Bamboo 01
Tang Contemporary Art
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Feng Yan, Psychedelic Bamboo 01 (2009). Courtesy Tang Contemporary Art.

Feng Yan, Psychedelic Bamboo 01 (2009). Courtesy Tang Contemporary Art.

Feng Yan is one of the most renowned photography artists in China. As the title suggests, Psychedelic Bamboo celebrates the nearly surreal ubiquity of bamboo in both Chinese art and nature with a nod to Western psychedelic culture. This abstraction of nature echos both the dynamic nonrepresentational style often used in traditional Chinese calligraphy, yet it is distanced further by the use of photography. The psychedelic effect more or less alludes to the psychological response to the transformation of a rather ordinary and commonplace natural object into a romanticized image.

Yi Zhang


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