Be Sure to Click Your Way Over to These 8 Frieze Online Viewing Rooms

The Frieze art fair may be an online experience this year, but there is still plenty to see.

Evelyn Statsinger, ,Sassacricket High (1987). Courtesy of Richard Gray Gallery.
Evelyn Statsinger, ,Sassacricket High (1987). Courtesy of Richard Gray Gallery.

Don your best pajamas, get out your VIP password, get comfy at home, and get ready to start cruising through the 2020 Frieze Art Fair.

Though it’s a novel experience (and perhaps not quite an intuitive one), the first online Frieze art fair still offers the caliber (and nearly the quantity) of artworks we’ve come to expect of the premier fair, such that you could while away an entire day browsing its viewing rooms on your laptop. 

If you’re interested in exploring but don’t know where to start, here are nine of our favorite viewing rooms to get you started. 

 

Salon 94

Laurie Simmons, Birthday Cake (1984). Courtesy of Salon 94

Laurie Simmons, Birthday Cake (1984). Courtesy of Salon 94.

What’s On View: Be sure to check out the gallery’s selection of Laurie Simmons’s glamorous but eerie photographs from the 1980s, which mix the aesthetics of fashion glossies with a noir sensibility.

Also on view are the dizzyingly colorful Lisa Frank-meets-LSD works of Los Angeles-based artist Alake Shilling, design objects by Tom Sachs and Donald Judd, and a playful group of works by Ruby Neri, Marina Adams, and others.

 

Gagosian

Katharina Grosse, Untitled (2017). © Katharina Grosse und VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2020. Photo: Jens Ziehe. Courtesy Gagosian.

What’s On View: Gagosian is showing works by Katharina Grosse, whose distinctive synthesis of architecture, sculpture, and painting comes off remarkably well online.

A selection of her recent sculptures, as well as acrylic-on-paper works, are offered here. ((And a portion of the proceeds from the sale of select works will be donated to Human Rights Watch.)

 

Richard Saltoun Gallery

Olga de Amaral, Cuatro Paises. Courtesy of Richard Saltoun Gallery

Olga de Amaral, Cuatro Paises. Courtesy of Richard Saltoun Gallery.

What’s On View: Lovers of textile arts should be sure not to miss Richard Saltoun’s presentation.

The viewing room includes hanging works by fiber-art pioneers, including Olga de Amaral, Peter Collingwood, and the Croatian artist Jagoda Buic, whose sculptural works, though made from soft materials, pack a powerful, Arte Povera-inspired punch.   

 

Lehmann Maupin

Alex Prager, Yellow Pages (2019). Courtesy of Lehmann Maupin

Alex Prager, Yellow Pages (2019). Courtesy of Lehmann Maupin.

What’s On View: Scheduled exhibitions may be postponed for the coming months, but brand-new, fresh-from-the-studio works can still be viewed here.

Lehmann Maupin’s booth includes works by Shirazeh Houshiary, Nari Ward, and McArthur Binion, alongside examples by Billy Childish, Teresita Fernández, Lee Bul, Catherine Opie, and Lari Pittman.

 

Michael Rosenfeld Gallery

Bob Thompson, The Golden Ass (1963). Courest of Michael Rosenfeld Gallery.

Bob Thompson, The Golden Ass (1963). Courtesy of Michael Rosenfeld Gallery.

What’s On View: Though figurative painting has enjoyed renewed enthusiasm lately, it’s important to remember that it never really went away.

Michael Rosenfeld Gallery’s insightful viewing room certainly makes that clear through a historical presentation of works by Benny Andrews (1930–2006), Robert Colescott (1925–2009), and Bob Thompson (1937–1966), each of whom sometimes inserted autobiographical details into their work.

 

Gray Gallery

John Stezaker, Janus I (2018). Courtesy of Richard Gray.

John Stezaker, Janus I (2018). Courtesy Gray, Chicago/New York.

What’s On View: British conceptual artist John Stezaker has been mixing stills from mid-century films with celebrity headshots into surrealist compositions for decades.

His recent works, at the viewing room of Gray Gallery (formerly Richard Gray), capture a sense of nostalgia mixed with dystopian aesthetics in a way that feels particularly relevant. Also be sure to look for a group of paintings from the 1980s and ’90s by American artist Evelyn Statsinger (b. 1927). Statsinger, who passed away in 2016, made works that combine the visual language of Southwest mysticism with the pop of Memphis Design.

 

The Mayor Gallery

Jan Henderikse, PP18-C, 1966. Courtesy of Mayor Gallery

Jan Henderikse, PP18-C (1966). Courtesy of Mayor Gallery

What’s On View: Dutch-born artist Jan Henderikse first found inspiration in the ZERO movement of the late 1950s, whose members rejected traditional painting methods.

Here, the Mayor Gallery presents a selection of Henderikse’s “readymade” art objects, including his best-known license plates, coin reliefs, and Polaroid assemblages.

 

Marian Goodman Gallery

Annette Messager, Doigt d’Honneur à la Mort (2020). Courtesy of Marian Goodman Gallery

Annette Messager, Doigt d’Honneur à la Mort (2020). Courtesy of Marian Goodman Gallery.

What’s On View: William Kentridge, Annette Messager, and Giuseppe Penone—three living artists with significant legacies—are including in Marian Goodman’s viewing room, which presents new works and earlier pieces whose significance has deepened in our current moment.

The works on view are primarily watercolors and drawings, and capture a sense of immediacy and intimacy that resonates with new meaning. 

Frieze Week 2020 is on view through Friday, May 15, 2020.


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