A New Digital Platform Connects the Rising Wave of Mongolian Artists to International Collectors

    Mongolian Digital Art is an online gallery that showcases the work of native artists in various stages of their careers.

    Odkhuu Sengee, My Sons (1986). Courtesy of Mongolian Digital Art.

    Today, a new platform for showing the work of Mongolian artists launches online.

    The site, Mongolian Digital Art, is not dissimilar from a traditional gallery in the way it operates. It will host a rotating series of curated digital exhibitions featuring the work of Mongolian artists in various stages of their careers. All work will be for sale, just as it would be in a brick and mortar gallery show, but it won’t be limited by geography; anyone from anywhere on the planet will have access to it through the site.

    Odkhuu Sengee, Morning, Day, Night (year unknown). Courtesy of Mongolian Digital Art.

    The goal, as conceived by founder Maizorig Janchivdorj, is to introduce the Mongolian art scene to the international stage, especially for collectors. Janchivdorj created the company in November of last year. As of now, it represents 31 artists, all of whom hail from the country, but it has plans to grow from there.

    Inaugurating Mongolian Digital Art’s exhibition program are two artists: Odkhuu Sengee and her daughter Zolbootuguldur Orgil. The duo’s work is the focus of Mongolian Digital Art’s first show, “Anonymous Star.”

    Odkhuu Sengee, Anonymous Star (year unknown). Courtesy of Mongolian Digital Art.

    Sengee was born in Ulaanbaatar, the capital of Mongolia, in 1956 and attended the Russian Academy of Arts in Leningrad in the late 1970s. She primarily worked with ink and watercolor on paper, making graphic portraits of friends, family, and others before passing away in 2009.

    Orgil, born in 1987, paints animated portraits that channel traditional Mongolian painting tropes—an homage to the styles standardized by older artists like her mother. A face of emerging young artists in her home country, Orgil won first place in the Grand Art exhibition of Young Mongolian Artists in both 2014 and 2015.

    Zolbootuguldur Orgil, Pancy (2016). Courtesy of Mongolian Digital Art.

    “Anonymous Star” will be live online for 45 days. See a selection of works from the show below.

    Odkhuu Sengee, Anonymous (2006). Courtesy of Mongolian Digital Art.

    Odkhuu Sengee, Composition (year unknown). Courtesy of Mongolian Digital Art.

    Odkhuu Sengee, Ladies 2 (year unknown). Courtesy of Mongolian Digital Art.

    Odkhuu Sengee, Zolbootuguldur Orgil, Daughter(year unknown). Courtesy of Mongolian Digital Art.


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