Munich’s Galleries Are Inviting Their International Counterparts for a Month-Long Collaborative Project. Here’s What You Won’t Want to Miss

Galleries throughout the city will be welcoming guest curators and artists for a dazzling array of shows.

Installation view by KAYA, Fondazione Memmo, Rome, Italy, 2018.
Installation view by KAYA, Fondazione Memmo, Rome, Italy, 2018. Courtesy of the artists and Deborah Schamoni.

Munich will have you know it’s not Berlin, thank you very much—and that’s not a bad thing.

The city, which prizes itself on being the cool grownup in the room (think edgy without acting out), holds some of of the biggest state and private collections in Germany. On top of that, with big companies like Siemens and BMW fueling its economy, it is home a generations of collectors, who don’t just look, but buy.

That spirit underpins the city’s month long art takeover, Various Others, an initiative that brings together local galleries with international ones for collaborative projects. Among the visitors this year will be the likes of London’s Hollybush Gardens, ShangHART from Shanghai, and New York-based galleries Gavin Brown’s Enterprise and Sperone Westwater.

With events and exhibitions taking place all month, there’s a lot to see. To set you on your way, we’ve picked five collaborations you’ll definitely want to prioritize.

 

Computer und Papier” at Jahn und Jahn

Felix Thiele, Handy 750 (2018). Courtesy of the artist.

Felix Thiele, Handy 750 (2018). Courtesy of the artist.

This gallery formed in 2017 when Fred Jahn and Matthias Jahn’s galleries joined forces. Whereas Matthias pours his attention into emerging artists, Fred continues to cultivate renowned postwar German artists such as Georg Baselitz and Gerhard Richter.

For Various Others, the gallery will be presenting a mix of emerging and established artists in Computer und Papier, an exhibition looking at the interactions between digital media and the traditional medium of paper.

Featuring works by Thomas Baldischwyler, Soyon Jung, Albert Oehlen, Laura Owens, Avery Singer, and Felix Thiele, the show wonders how the new digital economy informs artists, and how paper can benefit from digital tools. The results are more complicated than you may have guessed.

 

Augustas Serapinas & Malte Zenses” at Sperling

Augustas Serapinas, Late Autumn in Magunai (2018). Courtesy of Emalin Gallery.

Augustas Serapinas, Late Autumn in Magunai (2018). Courtesy of Emalin Gallery.

Artists Augustas Serapinas and Malte Zenses will be the focus of this collaboration between London’s Emalin gallery and Sperling gallery in Munich.

The heady show will include Zenses’s paintings, which translate personal experiences into abstract codes, and Serapinas’s sculptures, which expose hidden architectural elements and histories, and elaborate on how architecture creates social relationships that often remain obscured.

 

Andrea Büttner” at Barbara Gross Galerie

Andrea Büttner, Beggar, (2016). Courtesy of Galerie Sabine Kunst.

Andrea Büttner, Beggar (2016). Courtesy of Galerie Sabine Kunst.

In another London–Munich collaboration, Barbara Gross Galerie is welcoming Hollybush Gardens for an exhibition of work by German artist Andrea Büttner. On view will be Büttner’s “Beggars” woodcut series, which depicts veiled figures in cowering postures, forcing us to question relationships between poverty and shame.

Alongside these are “iPhone Etchings” by Büttner that capture her finger tracings. Reminiscent of abstract paintings, the prints link our virtual and digital movements to the “IRL” body. What’s more? Her prints will be installed against a playful and Instagram-friendly room dressed in yellow velour wall coverings.

 

Paul Morrison: Dahlia” and “Attercliffe™” at Galerie Sabine Knust

A work by Paul Morrison. Courtesy of Galerie Sabine Kunst.

A work by Paul Morrison. Courtesy of Galerie Sabine Kunst.

Founded in 1982, Galerie Sabine Knust is a Munich gallery stalwart, but one that stills exists on the edge of the contemporary art scene. For his two-pronged project through the gallery, British artist Paul Morrison will set up a Victorian bank branch and bring together many of the leading players of the contemporary British art scene.

Meanwhile, a selection of Morrison’s latest creations, which combine appropriated images from botanical studies, still life images, films, and works of architecture, will be on view.

 

“KAYA” and “Paul Gondry” at Deborah Schamoni Gallery

KAYA (Kerstin Brätsch and Debo Eilers), Take Hell-Raiser (black) (2019) Courtesy of the artists and Deborah Schamoni.

KAYA (Kerstin Brätsch and Debo Eilers), Take Hell-Raiser (black) (2019). Courtesy of the artists and Deborah Schamoni.

For Various Others, Munich’s Deborah Schamoni gallery is partnering with MX Gallery from New York for two promising presentations.

The first will showcase the work of the artist duo known as KAYA (Kerstin Brätsch and Debo Eilers), who conceive of their paintings and sculptures as the primary materials of a larger conceptual and multidisciplinary project.

Also on view will be the dark-ages-informed painting and video work of Paul Gondry, whose creations take place in a fictional (but quite unimaginable) dying civilization afflicted by gluttonous despondency.

Various Others runs from September 12–October 13 at venues throughout the city, with opening weekend from September 12–14, which includes a number of events.


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