How to Critique the Art of a Taurus Without Getting in a Brawl + More Advice From a Professional Witch

We spoke to Bri Luna, also known as the Hoodwitch, about what artists born under the sign should expect this season.

Taurus From a Book of Hours (G14, f.6) Italy, perhaps Milan Third quarter of the Fifteenth Century. Courtesy of the Morgan Library & Museum.
Taurus From a Book of Hours (G14, f.6) Italy, perhaps Milan Third quarter of the Fifteenth Century. Courtesy of the Morgan Library & Museum.

Welcome to Taurus season, a time for both luxury and lounging! The second sign in the zodiac calendar, Taurus, is represented by the celestial bull, a majestic but stubborn creature that reflects the Taurean temperament. Those born under the sign (April 20–May 20) are lovers of indulgence and known for wanting the best of the very best. 

Taurus is an earth sign, which means it keeps its focus on worldly pleasures. Taurus season embodies the “work hard, play hard” mentality. While fiercely loyal and hardworking, no sign enjoys relaxation, sensuality, and lavish parties more. Perhaps it’s no surprise that Salvador Dalí was a Taurus—the prolific Surrealist was famed for his elaborate ​​fêtes and extravagant wardrobe. French Romantic painter Eugène Delacroix, too, was a Taurus, known for his sensuous approach to painting and his amorous personal life. Other Tauruses include Albrecht Dürer, Tamara de Lempicka, and Cy Twombly.

Bri Luna, the Hood Witch. Courtesy of Bri Luna.

Bri Luna, the Hood Witch. Courtesy of Bri Luna.

This zodiac season, we reached out to Seattle-based mystic Bri Luna, known as the Hoodwitch, who is a leading voice in the American witchcraft community. Luna merges aspects of tarot, astrology, and mysticism, with spiritual traditions rooted in her Mexican and African American heritage. As the founder and creative director of the Hoodwitch, Luna aims to create a more inclusive and socially conscious mystic community—but as a Taurus herself, she also loves to relax and indulge. At the moment, Bri Luna is working on a book with Harper Collins to be released in 2023 (check her website for updates).

We spoke to the Hoodwitch about the Taurus eye for detail, why those born under this sign should not just have any old day job, and why we should all be steering clear of gossip this Taurus season. 

What are Tauruses’ strongest qualities as artists?

Being that Tauruses are Venusian ruled and that Venus rules all of the arts and sensuality, Tauruses have a love of texture and color and just a fine eye for detail and luxury. Those are things that bleed into our aesthetic as artists. People have a misconception about Tauruses as crunchy granola when they are some of the most luxurious people out there. Particularly when it comes to art, we appreciate quality over quantity—so in terms of investment, that means a beautiful piece of clothing, a gorgeous jewel, or the best artwork money can afford. As artists, it means an eye for detail and an unparalleled visual aesthetic.

What about artistic pitfalls?

In the creative sense, we don’t like being rushed. If you’re working in the art world or you’re an artist born underneath the sign, we like to make sure we have the time to do our work properly. We don’t work well with people ordering us around and thrive with a lot of creative freedom. I also think that we tend to get a little bit lazy when we’re unmotivated or uninspired by the project. And if we’re not really in love with what we’re doing, Tauruses can procrastinate or get complacent. As artists of any kind, Tauruses need to make sure to push themselves outside of their comfort zones and not get stuck with just repeating the tried and true. If something works for us, we tend to return to it over and over again, so I think an important challenge for Taurus artists is to take more risks and get outside the comfort bubble.

What is the ideal environment for Tauruses to work in? What should Tauruses keep in their studios or homes to keep themselves inspired?

Lots of plants, fresh air, sunlight, crystals, minerals, and nature in all forms—the beach, the forest, the desert. Tauruses should keep as many natural elements in their creative space as possible. They should also keep objects that bring a sense of sensuality: lush patterns and pops of color.

How should a Taurus artist start the day?

Waking up to a beautiful living space! I would say waking up in a really comfortable bed with luxury bed linens and pleasurable scents of candles or flowers. Start the day with a delicious breakfast. I like drinking my mimosas. For Tauruses, art and pleasure go hand-in-hand. I personally love starting my day with sex. Sexual energy is creative energy and transmuting that into art is very inspiring for Tauruses.

How do you give Tauruses feedback on their art in a way that they will be receptive to?

Tauruses don’t take kindly to harsh criticism. We will literally fight back—think of a bull in a china shop. Feedback has to come from a place of love; honest criticisms that are not meant to be hurtful should ideally be wrapped in praise. Tauruses are tough, but also sensitive. We will also only hear criticism from someone at the top of their field. We certainly don’t want a critique from someone who has never created anything. All in all, it needs to be done in a manner that is loving and genuine. Give us all of the good feedback first and then make suggestions, but don’t just jump right in and tell us, “You know what, this is terrible!”  Tauruses are stubborn so you don’t want to engage in a battle of the wills. 

If a Taurus falls into a creative rut, what should they do to get back on track?

Go do something in nature—go for a walk. If it’s a bigger creative block, go on a retreat or a vacation. Tauruses need to make sure to nourish themselves and take good care of their bodies. Tauruses are very physical and embodied people, so whenever we’re stressed or depressed, we need to be treated via the body, whether that’s a massage or a soothing bath. Lots of self-care. 

If an art career isn’t taking off right now, what would be the best day job for a tourist?

God, Tauruses hate day jobs. Become a sugar baby! No Taurus wants to work at a job that isn’t aligned with their vision. 

What should we all look out for this Taurus season? What should we be doing or not doing?

We have a lot of big energy coming up for this Taurus season. May is going to be a packed month. We have Jupiter entering Aries. We have Mercury retrograde. We have a lunar eclipse. We have the Mars Jupiter conjunction.

Lots of secrets, lots of revising, lots of planning. We should be going inward on our own spiritual journeys and staying out of drama. A lot of information from the past is going to be getting brought up and it’s important for us to learn how to navigate that spiritually. Stay away from gossip. It’s really important for us to stay as aligned and as genuine and as true to ourselves and our core beliefs as possible at this moment. 

Wondering which artists are Tauruses? Here are some of art history’s best.

Carrie Mae Weems: April 20, 1953

Artist Carrie Mae Weems, 2001. Photograph by Jack Mitchell/Getty Images.

Artist Carrie Mae Weems, 2001. Photograph by Jack Mitchell/Getty Images.

Bridget Riley: April 24, 1931 

Portrait of British Op artist Bridget Riley with some of her work, 1975. Photograph by Jack Mitchell/Getty Images.

Portrait of British Op artist Bridget Riley with some of her work, 1975. Photograph by Jack Mitchell/Getty Images.

Eugène Delacroix: April 25, 1928

Eugène Delacroix, Self-portrait (1837). Image in the public domain.  

Eugène Delacroix, Self-portrait (1837). Image in the public domain.

Cy Twombly: April 25, 1928

Cy Twombly. Photograph by David Lees/Getty Images.

Cy Twombly. Photograph by David Lees/Getty Images.

Yves Klein:  April 28, 1928  

French artist Yves Klein in a bowler hat as he stands in front of one of his Blue Sponge Sculptures, France, late 1950s. The first public display of these sculptures, which were made from different sized sponges that had been dyed blue, was on June 15, 1959 at the Galerie Iris Clert in Paris, France. Photograph by Express Newspapers/Getty Images.

French artist Yves Klein in a bowler hat. Photograph by Express Newspapers/Getty Images.

Salvador Dalí: May 11, 1904 

Spanish Surrealist artist Salvador Dali (1904–1989). He is wearing a pinstriped suit and his trademark mustache. Photograph by Hulton Archive/Getty Images.

Spanish Surrealist artist Salvador Dali (1904–89). Photograph by Hulton Archive/Getty Images.

Jasper Johns: May 15, 1930

Artist Jasper Johns photographed at an exhibition of his work at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1977. Photo by Jack Mitchell/Getty Images.

Artist Jasper Johns photographed at an exhibition of his work at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1977. Photo by Jack Mitchell/Getty Images.

Tamara de Lempicka: May 16, 1898 

Tamara de Lempicka, french-polish painter with a hat designed by Rose Descat, Paris. Photography 1932. Photo by Imagno/Getty Images.

Tamara de Lempicka with a hat designed by Rose Descat, Paris. Photography 1932. Photo by Imagno/Getty Images.

Graciela Iturbide: May 16, 1942 

Mexican photographer Graciela Iturbide poses for a picture at her studio designed by Mexican architect Mauricio Rocha in Mexico City, on October 22, 2021. Photo by PEDRO PARDO /AFP via Getty Images.

Mexican photographer Graciela Iturbide on October 22, 2021. Photo by PEDRO PARDO /AFP via Getty Images.


Follow Artnet News on Facebook:


Want to stay ahead of the art world? Subscribe to our newsletter to get the breaking news, eye-opening interviews, and incisive critical takes that drive the conversation forward.

Share