Editors’ Picks: 13 Things to See in New York This Week

From David Hockey to Judy Chicago, here's what's on our calendar this week.

David Hockney, Walk Around Hotel Acatlan (2017). Photo by Richard Schmidt, ©David Hockney.

Each week, we search New York City for the most exciting and thought-provoking shows, screenings, and events. See them below.

 

Tuesday, April 3–Saturday, May 19

Joseph La Piano, installation view. Photo courtesy of Sara Kay Gallery.

Joseph La Piano, installation view. Photo courtesy of Sara Kay Gallery.

1. “Tension Between: Joseph La Piana” at Sara Kay Gallery
Joseph La Piana has installed one of his signature “Tensions” installations made from latex bands saturated in talc powder and stretched to the limit in his new exhibition at Sara Kay Gallery. The artist will also install related monumental works along the Park Avenue Mall from 53rd to 72nd streets this spring.

Location: Sara Kay Gallery, 4 East 2nd Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Friday, 11 a.m.–5 p.m.; Saturday, 12 p.m.–5 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Wednesday, April 4–Wednesday, June 6

Margaret Vendryes’s Anang Tammi, African Diva (2010). Courtesy of the artist and Tucker Contemporary art.

2. “REVIVAL: Contemporary Pattern & Decoration” at El Museo del Barrio’s Hostos Center for Arts & Culture
In collaboration with the Bronx Council on the Arts, El Museo looks at the work of 26 artists whose work falls into the category of “Pattern and Decoration,” which emerged as a response to the homogeneity of the male-dominated Minimalist movement in the 1970s. In contrast, “P&D” artists use repetition, color, and line, often abstracted, to illustrate the body and its place in the world.

Location: Longwood Art Gallery, 450 Grand Concourse at 149th Street, Bronx
Price: Free
Time: Monday–Friday, 12 p.m.–5 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein

Thursday, April 5–Saturday, April 7

Abraham Cruzvillegas, Bárbara Foulkes, and Andrés García Nestitla, view of the performance <em>Insistir Insistir Insistir</em> in La Pista, Mexico City. Photo by Carlos Altamirano Allende, courtesy of the artists.

Abraham Cruzvillegas, Bárbara Foulkes, and Andrés García Nestitla, view of the performance Insistir Insistir Insistir in La Pista, Mexico City. Photo by Carlos Altamirano Allende, courtesy of the artists.

3. “Abraham Cruzvillegas: Autoreconstrucción” at the Kitchen
Abraham Cruzvillegas is creating one of his “Autoreconstrucción” sculptures, made from materials gathered from the streets of Chelsea and its many construction sites, at the Kitchen. The installation will host an improvised aerial performance, titled To insist, to insist, to insist, by choreographer Bárbara Foulkes with a musical intervention by Andrés García Nestitla, at various times each day. The artist also is installing works from the series at the new New York project space for Mexico City’s kurimanzutto gallery, located at 22 East 65th Street (April 2–May 12) and set to officially debut next month.

Location: The Kitchen, 512 West 19th Street
Price: Free
Time: Performances, April 5 and 6, 6:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.; April 7, 2:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., and 6:30 p.m. Talk April 7, 5 p.m.; On view, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Thursday, April 5–Saturday, May 5

Sarah Sagarin, <em>The Sea Was Wet as Could Be</em>. Courtesy of Pen + Brush.

Sarah Sagarin, The Sea Was Wet as Could Be. Courtesy of Pen + Brush.

4. “Angst and Contempt: New Painting” at Pen + Brush
This group show features the work of Kharis Kennedy, Dana Kotler, Stacy Leigh, Melita Osheowitz, and Sarah Sagarin, who are all “navigating the grim realities of today’s world through the context of contemporary painting,” according to the exhibition description.

Location: Pen + Brush, 29 East 22nd Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Thursday, April 5–Saturday, May 12

David Hockney’s A Picture of a Lion (2017). © David Hockney, Courtesy of Pace.

5. “David Hockney: Something New in Painting (and Photography) [and even Printing]” at Pace
The indefatigable David Hockney has yet another new body of work coming to Pace, this time continuing his recent foray into hexagonally shaped canvases, a practice he developed as part of his lifelong interest in the dominance of Western perspective in art. The gallery will also present a handful of Hockney’s newest computer-manipulated photography.

Location: Pace, 510 West 25th Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein

Thursday, April 5–Friday, May 25

Jonas Wood’s Untitled (from 8 Etchings) (2014). Photo: Brian Forrest, © Jonas Wood.

6. “Jonas Wood: Prints” at Gagosian Gallery
Jonas Wood‘s prints, on display at Gagosian’s uptown gallery, touch on many of the same themes that appear in his large-scale murals: potted plants, domestic interiors, and other microcosms of daily life.

Location: Gagosian Gallery, 976 Madison Avenue
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Monday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein

Friday, April 6–Friday, May 25

Eva Hesse's <i>Accession V</i> (1968). Courtesy of Craig F. Starr Gallery. Galvanized steel and rubber, 10 x 10 x 10 inches LeWitt Collection, Chester, CT

Eva Hesse’s Accession V (1968). Courtesy of Craig F. Starr Gallery.

7. “Eva Hesse: Arrows and Boxes, Repeated” at Craig F. Starr Gallery
The late Eva Hesse‘s most recent solo show in New York opened in 2011, a year that saw the final Harry Potter film dominate the box office, Kate Middleton become the Duchess of Cambridge and the White House release first-term President Barack Obama’s “long-form” birth certificate. In short, it’s been a while. Craig F. Starr Gallery will end the city’s prolonged drought with an exhibition ranging from Hesse’s early drawings to late sculptures and paintings, all sourced through loans from the artist’s estate and various private collections. My advice? Don’t miss it. Because if the next one doesn’t open until 2025, all bets are off as to where we’ll be then.

Location: Craig F. Starr Gallery, 5 East 73rd Street, between 5th and Madison Avenues
Price: Free
Time: Normal gallery hours, Monday–Saturday: 11 a.m.–5:30 p.m.

—Tim Schneider

Friday, April 6–Sunday, June 10

“When Moms Dance” by Roz Chast, from the New Yorker Cartoon. © Conde Nast.

8. “Oh, Mother” at the Picture Room
New Yorker cartoon editor Emma Allen, artists Hallie Bateman, Roz Chast, Glynnis Fawkes, and Emily Flake tackle the always entertaining subject of the parent/child relationship as shown through original sketches, published cartoons, and other material. As a starting point, Allen highlighted an early cartoon by Roz Chast, ‘WHEN MOMS DANCE,’ which she discussed in an interview with artnet News’s Andrew Goldstein last August.

Location: Picture Room, 117 Atlantic Avenue
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday: 1 p.m.–7 p.m.; Friday & Saturday: 11 a.m.–7 p.m.; Sunday: 11 a.m.–5 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein

Saturday, April 7
Judy Chicago, <em>Roots of “The Dinner Party”: History in the Making</em>. Image courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum.

Judy Chicago, Roots of “The Dinner Party”: History in the Making. Image courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum.

9. Judy Chicago Book Signing at the Brooklyn Museum
In celebration of the release of her new line of dinner plates, placemats, scarves, and other products with the Prospect NY, Judy Chicago heads back to the Brooklyn Museum for a signing of her new book Roots of “The Dinner Party”: History in the Making.

Location: The Brooklyn Museum, Museum Shop, 200 Eastern Parkway, first floor
Price: Free
Time: 12 p.m.–2 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Saturday, April 7–Sunday, April 29
Bernard Klevickas, <em>Mirrored Branch</em>, one of several works by the artist set to go on view at the City Reliquary in Brooklyn. Photo courtesy of the artist.

Bernard Klevickas, Mirrored Branch, one of several works by the artist set to go on view at the City Reliquary in Brooklyn. Photo courtesy of the artist.

10. “NYC Trash! Past, Present, & Future” at the City Reliquary
The City Reliquary has turned its backyard into a sculpture garden featuring the work of 10 local trash artists, in a conservation-minded celebration of reuse and recycling. Niki Lederer, who makes hanging sculptures from colorful plastic bottles, and Bernard Klevickas, who creates sculpture from salvaged bicycle parts, are among those who will show their work out back, while an official Department of Sanitation garbage truck will be parked in front of the museum.

Location: The City Reliquary, 370 Metropolitan Avenue, Brooklyn
Price: $7
Time: Opening reception, 12 p.m.–3 p.m.; Thursday–Sunday, 12 p.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Saturday, April 27–June 27
The kitchen at the Egg House (rendering). Courtesy of Sense Studio.

The kitchen at the Egg House (rendering). Courtesy of Sense Studio.

11. The Egg House at 195 Chrystie Street
Visit “Ellis the Egg at” his home, the latest in an increasingly long list of art museum-style Instagram photo-op installations. The Egg House promises a multi-sensory “eggsperience” devoted to the beloved breakfast food. It’s the brainchild of Sense Studio, a group of young New York-based designers.

Location: Egg House, 195 Chrystie Street
Price: $18 general admission
Time: Timed tickets

—Sarah Cascone

Through Saturday, April 28

Bernd and Hilla Becher, Silo fur Kokskohle (Bachum Ruhr District), 2. Silo fur Erz (Waldolgesheim bei Bingen), 3. Silo fur Kohl (facht Auguste Victoria Essen) (1972). © Estate of Bernd and Hilla Becher. Courtesy of Paula Cooper Gallery, New York.

12. “Bernd and Hilla Becher: In Dialogue with Carl Andre and Sol LeWitt” at Paula Cooper Gallery
Virtually every introductory text about the Bechers includes a long list of artists they taught, influenced, or were otherwise associated with—from Andreas Gursky to Thomas Ruff to Candida Höfer, and so on. Carl Andre and Sol LeWitt are generally not included on those lists, though both had a long relationship with the pioneering husband-and-wife duo. Paula Cooper’s new exhibition, “Bernd and Hilla Becher: In Dialogue with Carl Andre and Sol LeWitt,” sheds light on those relationships, bringing together work from all four artists, as well as photographs taken by Matthias Schaller documenting the Becher’s home and working space. The exhibition was co-curated by the Becher’s son, a photographer who, like his parents, works in tandem with his spouse.

Location: Paula Cooper Gallery, 534 West 21st Street
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday – Saturday, 10:00 am – 6:00 pm

—Taylor Dafoe

Through Sunday, May 13

A limited edition Plant Print that Kickstarter contributors could receive. Image courtesy of Martin Roth and Kickstarter.

13. “Martin Roth: In November 2017 I collected a plant from the garden of a mass shooter.” at yours mine & ours
Austrian-born artist Martin Roth launched a Kickstarter campaign to fund the show at yours mine & ours, which opened March 31. The show’s title pretty much sums it up: Roth traveled to the home of Stephen Paddock—who in October 2017 shot and killed 58 people on the Las Vegas Strip—and dug up a small desert holly bush from Paddock’s gravelly, ill-tended garden. Roth brought the plant back to New York, where he has recreated aspects of the Mandalay Bay Hotel from which Paddock perched to carry out the massacre.

Location: yours mine & ours, 54 Eldridge Street
Price: Free
Time: Wednesday–Sunday, 12–6 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein


Follow artnet News on Facebook:


Want to stay ahead of the art world? Subscribe to our newsletter to get the breaking news, eye-opening interviews, and incisive critical takes that drive the conversation forward.

Share

Article topics