Editors’ Picks: 17 Things Not to Miss in New York’s Art World This Week

Here's what's on our radar this week.

Carmen Petzey, 16-years-old. Photo courtesy of the Bronx Documentary Center, ©Carmen Petzey/Fotokids Guatemala.
Carmen Petzey, 16-years-old. Photo courtesy of the Bronx Documentary Center, ©Carmen Petzey/Fotokids Guatemala.

Each week, we search New York City for the most exciting and thought-provoking shows, screenings, and events. See them below.

 

Tuesday, July 17

Nathan Silver, <em>'Ad Hoc' chair</em>, made from found objects. Photo courtesy of the Swiss Institute.

Nathan Silver, ‘Ad Hoc’ chair, made from found objects. Photo courtesy of the Swiss Institute.

1. “Conversation: Between the Adhoc and the Accidental” at the Swiss Institute 

In conjunction with the Swiss Institute’s current exhibition, “Readymades Belong to Everyone” (on view through August 19), Martino Stierli will moderate a conversation about the concept and the history of the Readymade between architect and writer Nathan Silver and Eva Díaz, an associate professor of history of art and design at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn.

Location: The Swiss Institute 38 St. Marks Place
Price: Free with RSVP
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Anthony Goicolea's design for a new monument honoring the LGBTQ community in New York CIty's Hudson River Park. Courtesy the artist and the office of Governor Andrew Cuomo.

Anthony Goicolea’s design for a new monument honoring the LGBTQ community in New York CIty’s Hudson River Park. Courtesy the artist and the office of Governor Andrew Cuomo.

2. “The LGBTQ Memorial: A Conversation With the Artist” at the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Community Center

Anthony Goicolea, the artist behind the new state-commissioned monument to honor New York’s LGBTQ community, unveiled last month in Hudson River Park, will discuss the work with Ian Alteveer, a Modern and contemporary art curator at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art. The evening will include refreshments and will conclude with a guided walk to the memorial.

Location: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Community Center. 208 West 13th Street
Price: Free
Time: 6 p.m.–8 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Tuesday, July 17–Friday, August 24

Judith Stenneken, <em>Staircase</em> (2018), video still. Image courtesy of Flowers Gallery.

Judith Stenneken, Staircase (2018), video still. Image courtesy of Flowers Gallery.

3. “yes no maybe” at Flowers Gallery

This heady take on the summer group show is mathematically inspired, featuring work generated by following rules designed to produced patterns and other algorithmic forms. The title takes its name from Bayes’s Theorem, the mathematical theory of probability published by Thomas Bayes in 1763. If you don’t have the faintest idea of what that is, the opening reception will include a panel discussion with Beryl Korot, Manfred Mohr, and Judith Stenneken, moderated by Zabet Patterson, that will hopefully help clue you in.

Location: Flowers Gallery, 529 West 20th Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Monday–Friday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Tuesday, July 17 and Thursday, July 19

Hajime Kinoko performing Kinbaku. Photo courtesy of Hajime Kinoko.

Hajime Kinoko’s model performing Kinbaku. Photo courtesy of Hajime Kinoko.

4. Hajime Kinoko Performance at the Museum of Sex

Hajime Kinoko, an artist of Kinbaku, an ancient Japanese art form that translates to “the beauty of tight binding,” will perform with model Aime Feti two nights at the Museum of Sex in conjunction with the current exhibition on Nobuyoshi Araki, who also has a show at Anton Kern Gallery (both through August 31). Tickets include a tasting of Heavensake.

Location: Museum of Sex, Lounge, 233 Fifth Avenue at East 27th Street
Price: $20
Time: 8 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Wednesday, July 18

Tim Maul, <em>Norwalk</em> (1985). Courtesy of Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects.

Tim Maul, Norwalk (1985). Courtesy of Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects.

5. ADAA Chelsea Gallery Walk

The Art Dealers Association of America has enlisted member galleries to stay open late for a free gallery walk, featuring artists including Milton Avery, Lynda Benglis, Helen Frankenthaler, Nan Goldin, Edward Hopper, Peter Hujar, Franz Kline, Sol LeWitt, Robert Mapplethorpe, Gordon Matta-Clark, and Mickalene Thomas. Among the special events being held for the occasion is Tim Maul’s recreation of his 1983 performance piece Whose Records, taking place at Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects. The person who visits the most galleries, sharing photographs from each one with the hashtag #ADAAChelseaGalleryWalk, will win a tote bag full of art books and exhibition catalogues.

Location: 30 Chelsea galleries, between West 18th and 36th Streets, and Tenth and Eleventh Avenues
Price: Free
Time: 6 p.m.–8 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Wednesday, July 18–Sunday, October 14

Diana Al-Hadid, <em>Nolli’s Order</em> (2012). Photo by Dennis Harvey, courtesy of the artist and Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York and Aspen. ©Diana Al-Hadid.

Diana Al-Hadid, Nolli’s Order (2012). Photo by Dennis Harvey, courtesy of the artist and Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York and Aspen. ©Diana Al-Hadid.

6. “Diana Al-Hadid: Delirious Matter” at the Bronx Museum of the Arts

Diana Al-Hadid is having somewhat of a moment, with her first major public art installation—currently on view in Madison Square Park (through September 3)—being joined by a museum show of the same name at the Bronx Museum. The centerpiece of the exhibition will be Nolli’s Order, a massive architectural ruin of a sculpture which was inspired by Giambattista Nolli’s 1748 map of Rome, a cartographic first that identified public spaces and buildings with transparent—as opposed to solid—markings.

Location: The Bronx Museum of the Art, 1040 Grand Concourse
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday, and Sunday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.; Friday, 11 a.m.–8 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Thursday, July 19

Malia Jensen, <em>Fruit and Nuts</em> (2018). Photo courtesy of Cristin Tierney.

Malia Jensen, Fruit and Nuts (2018). Photo courtesy of Cristin Tierney.

7. “Malia Jensen: Out West (Back East)” at Cristin Tierney 

Don’t miss Malia Jensen’s delightful show of ceramics, a new medium for the artist which she took up after the death of her father, a ceramics teacher. An eerie, giant pillbug, and a fruit bowl full of phallic and breast-like forms titled Fruits and Nuts, which “honors the life-force and fertility of both the earth and the mind,” according to the artist’s statement, are among the amusing highlights.

Location: Cristin Tierney, 540 West 28th Street
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, July 19

Cover Image: Thomas Bayrle, Bierrakete (Beer Rocket), 1969. Photo by Wolfgang Günzel.

Cover Image: Thomas Bayrle, Bierrakete (Beer Rocket), 1969. Photo by Wolfgang Günzel.

8. “Social Fabric: Thomas Bayrle’s Expanded Network” at the New Museum

Art historian and critic Alex Kitnick will talk with young artists Lena Henke, Jacolby Satterwhite, and Jordan Wolfson about how their work has been influenced by Thomas Bayrle (1937–) and his pioneering use of digital technology. The event is being held in conjunction with the museum’s current survey show of the German artist, “Thomas Bayrle: Playtime” (on view through September 2).

Location: The New Museum, 235 Bowery
Price: $15 general admission
Time: 7 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, July 19–Sunday, July 22

Sharon Castellanos, <em>Two girls from Huancavelica stand for a portrait during the International Festival of Street Theater in La Balanza (Fiteca), Comas, Lima, Peru</em> (2015). Photo courtesy of the Bronx Documentary Center, ©Sharon Castellanos/VII Mentor Program.

Sharon Castellanos, Two girls from Huancavelica stand for a portrait during the International Festival of Street Theater in La Balanza (Fiteca), Comas, Lima, Peru (2015). Photo courtesy of the Bronx Documentary Center, ©Sharon Castellanos/VII Mentor Program.

9. The Latin American Foto Festival in the Bronx

Don’t miss the first-ever Latin American Foto Festival, which is now in its second and final week. Curated by Michael Kamber and Cynthia Rivera, the exhibition is organized by the Bronx Documentary Center, its primary venue. Other locations include a local community garden, church, and school, with some venues bringing art by Caribbean and Latin American photographers directly into the streets.

Location: Various venues in the Melrose neighborhood of the Bronx on East 150th and 151st Streets, Melrose Avenue, and Cortland Avenue
Price: Free
Time: Thursday and Friday, 3 p.m.–7 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 1 p.m.–5 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Monday, July 16–Wednesday, August 22

Rene Phillips, <em>Creationism</em>. Courtesy of Pen + Brush.

Rene Phillips, Creationism. Courtesy of Pen + Brush.

10. “Process and Color: Renee Phillips & Kati Vilim” at Pen + Brush

In this two-women show, Kati Vilim, who bases her work on the unseen but ever-present underlying structures of math and science, presents two site-specific light installations. They are paired with Renee Phillips’s layered, heavily reworked canvases, the marbled effect of which is achieved by pouring, heating, sanding, and glazing paint, as well as exposing it to wind and water.

Location: Pen + Brush, 29 East Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Friday, July 20–Sunday, August 12

Tower Clock Gears, made by E. N. Byram of Sag Harbor. Photo courtesy of the Sag Harbor Whaling & Historical Museum.

Tower Clock Gears, made by E. N. Byram of Sag Harbor. Photo courtesy of the Sag Harbor Whaling & Historical Museum.

11. “When the World Was Wood” at the Sag Harbor Whaling & Historical Museum

Before we had plastic, before widespread use of metal became commonplace, early Americans relied on wood. The Sag Harbor Whaling & Historical Museum looks back at “America’s Wood Age,” as the period from 1650 to 1850 is sometimes called, with an exhibition showcasing ingenious uses of wood in 100 historical objects to make everything from a tricycle to a washing machine.

Location: Sag Harbor Whaling & Historical Museum, 200 Main Street, Sag Harbor
Price: $6 general admission
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Friday, July 20–Sunday, August 26

John Lucas and Claudia Rankine. Photo courtesy of Pioneer Works.

John Lucas and Claudia Rankine. Photo courtesy of Pioneer Works.

12. “Stamped: John Lucas and Claudia Rankine” at Pioneer Works

Do blondes really have more fun? The husband and wife duo of writer Claudia Rankine and filmmaker and photographer John Lucas have photographed Americans of all ages and racial backgrounds who have embraced blonde hair, long associated with beauty and desirability, and historically a symbol of whiteness. But when the artists asked why their subjects have chosen to be blonde, they found that most ignore the hair color’s racial implications.

Location: Pioneer Works, 159 Pioneer Street, Red Hook, Brooklyn
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 7 p.m.–9 p.m.; Wednesday–Sunday, 12 p.m.–7 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Friday, July 20Sunday, September 2

Katherine Bradford, <em>Summer Fun for F&V</eM> (2018). Courtesy of CANADA.

Katherine Bradford, Summer Fun for F&V (2018). Courtesy of CANADA.

13. “Summer of Love” at Freight + Volume and Arts + Leisure

Love and romance is the theme in this group show featuring the work of more than 100 artists spread over two gallery spaces. Expect figurative painting from the likes of Walter Robinson, Hope Gangloff, and Lola Schnabel, as well as abstract or text-based works by Michael Scoggins, Cary Liebowitz, Samuel Jablon, and others.

Location: Freight + Volume, 97 Allen Street, and Arts + Leisure, 1571 Lexington Avenue
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 7 p.m.–10 p.m. (Friday, July 20 at Freight + Volume, Saturday, July 21, at Arts + Leisure); Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Friday, July 20

Rosemary Engstrom, <i>M&M S&M</i> (2018). Courtesy of the artist.

Rosemary Engstrom, M&M S&M (2018). Courtesy of the artist.

14. “Rhode Island School of Design 2018 MFA Graduate Show” at ClampArt Gallery

The MFA graduate students at RISD will have their work up at ClampArt‘s Chelsea gallery this July. The seven artists—Chase Barnes, Erick Medel, Jay Simple, Jiehao Su, Nicholas Bridges, Rosemary Engstrom, and Shawn Bush—work in a variety of media but are all graduates of the school’s photography program.

Location: ClampArt Gallery, 247 West 29th Street
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein

Through Friday, July 27

Neil Winokur, <em>Orange</em>. Photo courtesy of Janet Borden Inc.

Neil Winokur, Orange. Photo courtesy of Janet Borden Inc.

15. “Little Big” at Janet Borden Inc. 

Janet Borden’s summer group show plays with the concept of scale in photography. These images, from artists including John Pfahl, Robert Cumming, and David Brandon Getting, play with our perceptions, already skewed by how we digest a constant stream of small photographic images on our smartphones.

Location: Janet Borden, Inc., 91 Water Street, Brooklyn
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 11 a.m.–5 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Saturday, July 28

Richard Prince, <em>Untitled (Kool-Aid)</em>, 2011. Courtesy of Almine Rech Gallery.

Richard Prince, Untitled (Kool-Aid), 2011. Courtesy of Almine Rech Gallery.

16. “Cliche” at Almine Rech Gallery

Unavoidably, art will engage with cliches, so why not embrace them? In this group show organized by Bill Powers, artists including Chloe Wise, Louis Dodd, Richard Prince, and George Condo tackle such well-trod subjects as dogs, rainbows, smiley faces, and skulls, showcasing the broad variety of works that can address—and hopefully breathe new life into—the same old tired subjects. Highlights include never-before-seen student work by John Currin and Jeff Koons.

Location: Almine Rech, 39 East 78th Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Monday–Friday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Friday, August 24

Nicholas Hlobo, <em>Intlantsana</em> (2017), detail. Photo by Anthea Pokroy, courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York, Hong Kong, and Seoul.

Nicholas Hlobo, Intlantsana (2017), detail. Photo by Anthea Pokroy, courtesy of the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York, Hong Kong, and Seoul.

17. “Nicholas Hlobo: Ulwamkelo” at Lehmann Maupin

South African artist Nicholas Hlobo’s work is about issues of identity, using materials such as leather and ribbon to suggest a contrast between the masculine and the feminine. In 2017, thieves stole a large number of mixed media paintings and sculptures from his Johannesburg studio. Recently, the South African artist recovered the missing works, which now make up the bulk of his current exhibition at Lehmann Maupin. The show’s title means “the welcoming,” in reference to the artworks’ return. It opened last week, but the gallery is throwing a party with a performance and artist’s talk this Wednesday, as part of the ADAA Chelsea Gallery Walk.

Location: Lehmann Maupin, 536 West 22nd Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, Wednesday, July 18, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone


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