Editors’ Picks: 16 Things Not to Miss in New York’s Art World This Week

Here's what's happening in New York this week.

The New York Botanical Garden hosts
The New York Botanical Garden hosts "Celebrate Hawai‘i Weekend: Fashion & Design." Photo courtesy of the New York Botanical Garden.

Each week, we search New York City for the most exciting and thought-provoking shows, screenings, and events. See them below.

 

Tuesday, July 24

Work by Jillian Mayer. Image courtesy of the Armory Show.

Work by Jillian Mayer. Image courtesy of the Armory Show.

1. “Me, Myself & the Internet” at NeueHouse, part of the Armory Show’s Armory Live

The New Yorker’s Naomi Fry talks with Miami artist Jillian Mayer about how the internet and the advent of the digital era have changed the ways in which we represent ourselves, contemplating the effects our online personas can have on our real lives.

Location: NeueHouse Madison Square, 110 East 25th Street
Price: Free with RSVP
Time: 6 p.m., conversation beginning at 6:15 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Dale Henry, "Interiors" series, <em>Pure Cadmium Red, Medium – Bath</em> (1978), collection of the Cleveland Museum of Art. Photo courtesy of Dale Henry.

Dale Henry, “Interiors” series, Pure Cadmium Red, Medium – Bath (1978), collection of the Cleveland Museum of Art. Photo courtesy of Dale Henry.

2. “The Legacy of Dale Henry: A Conversation with Alanna Heiss and Friends” at 87 Franklin Street

When post-Minimalist painter Dale Henry died in 2011, he bequeathed all his work to Alanna Heiss, founder of PS1 in Queens, with the caveat that none of it could be sold. This became a major project—now completed—for Heiss, who is ready to speak about how she has spent the subsequent years disseminating his holdings to collectors, institutions, critics, and artists.

Location: 87 Franklin Street
Price: Free with RSVP
Time: 6:30–9 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Tuesday, July 24–Friday, August 31

Tajh Rust’s Kleaver (2018). Courtesy of the artist and Fridman Gallery.

3. “Strange Beach” at Fridman Gallery

A group exhibition at Fridman’s Spring Street gallery includes the artists Arghavan Khosravi, Nate Lewis, and Tajh Rust—each of the artists address the human figure, sometimes as a metaphor, sometimes as a literal vessel that bears the marks of life experience. All three artists will be present for the opening reception.

Location: Fridman Gallery, 287 Spring Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Monday–Friday, 12 p.m.–6 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein

 

Wednesday, July 25

Image courtesy of the Center for Land Use Interpretation.

Image courtesy of the Center for Land Use Interpretation.

4. “Lecture: The Center for Land Use Interpretation” at the Swiss Institute

In conjunction with its current exhibition, “READYMADES BELONG TO EVERYONE,” the freshly reopened institution will hand its microphone to Program Manager Aurora Tang of the Center for Land Use Interpretation (CLUI), the Los Angeles-based organization dedicated to research, education, and exhibition-making about the ways humanity is reshaping the Earth’s surface. Tang’s specific topic will be the American landscape as “cultural product.” If that charged re-framing of the natural world sounds eye-opening, RSVP now, because space is limited and availability is shrinking by the minute.

Location: The Swiss Institute, 38 St. Marks Place
Price: Free with RSVP
Time: 7 p.m.

—Tim Schneider

 

Photo by Alex Escalante, courtesy of No Longer Empty.

Photo by Alex Escalante, courtesy of No Longer Empty.

5. “Dialogues on Transnational Curatorial Practice” at the 8th Floor

Kendal Henry, director of New York City’s Percent for Art Program, moderates this talk on socially engaged artistic and curatorial practices with members of CEC ArtsLink’s International Arts Leadership Fellows and No Longer Empty Curatorial Lab Curators.

Location: The 8th Floor, 17 West 17th Street
Price: Free with RSVP
Time: 6 p.m.–8 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Wednesday, July 25–Monday, July 30

Noma Osula, Untitled. Image courtesy the artist

6. “Vice Magazine 2018 Photo Show” at Parasol Projects

Vice magazine’s 2018 photography show—a partnership with pop-up specialist Parasol Projects—will coincide with the unveiling of its “Privacy and Perception” issue. The latest issue of the magazine delves into the many forces that shape our identities and how we portray our private and public selves. Nigeria-based photographer Noma Osula (above), uses wigs to make his models anonymous and raise questions about whether gender and sexuality can ever be expressed by what people wear.

Location:  Parasol Projects, 213 Bowery, New York
Price: Free
Time: Wednesday to Monday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Eileen Kinsella

 

Wednesday, July 25–Monday, December 31

Misra Walker, <em>Beauty Salon III</em> (2015). Photo courtesy of the International Center of Photography.

Misra Walker, Beauty Salon III (2015). Photo courtesy of the International Center of Photography.

7. “Vantage Point 24: Celebrating 20 Years” at the Point CDC

The International Center of Photography celebrates 20 years of offering photography classes for adolescents in the Bronx by showcasing the work of current students and alumni. Nadia Hallgren, who participated in the program, will premiere a documentary short at the exhibition opening.

Location: The Point CDC, 940 Garrison Avenue, Bronx
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 4:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m.; Monday–Sunday, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.; closed Labor Day; extended hours will be announced for the fall

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, July 26–Thursday, August 2

<em>Looking for Oum Kulthum</em>, (2017). Directed by Shirin Neshat, in collaboration with Shoja Azari. Film still courtesy of Razor Film.

Looking for Oum Kulthum, (2017). Directed by Shirin Neshat, in collaboration with Shoja Azari. Film still courtesy of Razor Film.

8. “The Future of Film Is Female” at the Museum of Modern Art

MoMA is kicking off a two-year series that celebrates young women movie directors in the hopes of working toward parity in the still male-dominated industry. The inaugural run includes films by Shirin Neshat, Gillian Robespierre, Maysaloun Hamoud, Coralie Fargeat, and Erin Lee Carr.

Location: The Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53rd Street
Price: $12 general admission for each screening
Time: Various screenings

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, July 26–Wednesday, September 5

Jonas Mekas, <em>A Walk</em> (1990). Film still courtesy of James Fuentes.

Jonas Mekas, A Walk (1990). Film still courtesy of James Fuentes.

9. “Jonas Mekas: Notes From Downtown” at James Fuentes

Anthology Film Archive founder Jonas Mekas, born in 1922, gets a solo show of his experimental filmmaking. There are also a set of Polaroids taken by a friend of the artist—one John Lennon—at a SoHo dumpling attended by the likes of Andy Warhol and Yoko Ono back in 1971, paired with Mekas’s own photographs of the gathering.

Location: James Fuentes, 55 Delancey Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Friday, 101a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Saturday, July 28

<em>White Rabbit</em> (2018), film still. Photo courtesy of Mister Lister Films.

White Rabbit (2018), film still. Photo courtesy of Mister Lister Films.

10. White Rabbit at the Asian American International Film Festival

A struggling Los Angeles artist supports her public performance art and social media-based digital art by doing odd jobs on TaskRabbit in this film, which is having its New York premiere at the Asian American International Film Festival.

Location: Village East Cinema, 181-189 2nd Ave
Price: $16 general admission
Time: 2:45 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Saturday, July 28 and Sunday, July 29

The New York Botanical Garden hosts "Celebrate Hawai‘i Weekend: Fashion & Design," featuring a pop-up fashion shoot with designer Manaola Yap. Photo courtesy of the New York Botanical Garden.

The New York Botanical Garden hosts “Celebrate Hawai‘i Weekend: Fashion & Design,” featuring a pop-up fashion shoot with designer Manaola Yap. Photo courtesy of the New York Botanical Garden.

11. “Celebrate Hawai’i Weekend: Fashion & Design” at the New York Botanical Garden

The NYBG’s summer-long celebration of Hawaii continues with a weekend full of island-themed activities and programming, including a fashion show and demonstrations on making leis and traditional kapa fabric, made from mulberry or breadfruit fibers. There will also be a display of gowns worn by Hawaiian monarchs Queen Kapi‘olani and Queen Lili‘uokalani. It’s all part of the garden’s current exhibition, “Georgia O’Keeffe: Visions of Hawai’i” (on view through October 28), which reunites 17 paintings made by O’Keeffe in 1939 during a paid trip to Hawaii for the company that sells Dole pineapples.

Location: New York Botanical Garden, 2900 Southern Boulevard
Price: $28
Time: 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Sunday, July 29

"Sylvia Netzer: Virtebrae" installation shot. Photo by Sebastian Bach, courtesy of A.I.R.

“Sylvia Netzer: Virtebrae” installation shot. Photo by Sebastian Bach, courtesy of A.I.R.

12. “Virtebrae: Sylvia Netzer” at A.I.R.

Sylvia Netzer’s new ceramics are based on the bones of the spinal column and transformed into a multiple. The clay sculptures hang on ropes like the rungs of a ladder or are strung like beads with pink Spalding balls. According to the artist, she works with clay “because of its implied fragility and because so much of our built environment is brick, terra cotta and earth.”

Location: A.I.R., 155 Plymouth Street, Brooklyn
Price: Free
Time: Wednesday–Sunday, 12 p.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Sunday, July 29

Matthew Shipp, piano; Michael Bisio, bass; Newman Taylor Baker, drums.

13. “The Matthew Shipp Trio” at the Museum of Modern Art

As part of MoMA’s Summergarden festival, the Matthew Shipp Trio will put on a jazzy concert this Sunday evening. In describing their sound, Shipp says: “The written material is meant to be a prod to catapult the trio to certain mind spaces, and from there we give it over to nature and take off.”

Location: Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53rd Street, entrance to Garden at West 54th Street between 5th and 6th avenues.
Price: Free, come early to snag a seat
Time: Sculpture Garden opens at 7 p.m., concert begins at 8 p.m.–9:30 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein

 

Through Wednesday, August 1

Paula Crown, <em>ENtitleist</em> (2017). Photo courtesy of For Freedoms.

Paula Crown, ENtitleist (2017). Photo courtesy of For Freedoms.

14. “Paula Crown: I Am For” at Fort Gansevoort

Fort Gansevoort has become For Freedoms HQ, home to an exhibition of work by Paula Crown organized by Hank Willis Thomas and Eric Gottesman’s civic engagement platform for artists. The work, which evokes environmental activism, includes massive 3-D milled alabaster golf ball, ENtitleist.

Location: Fort Gansevoort, 5 Ninth Avenue
Price: Free
Time: Wednesday–Sunday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Friday, August 3

Ryan Mrozowski, Untitled (Pair), 2018. Photo courtesy of Lyles and King.

Ryan Mrozowski, Untitled (Pair), 2018. Photo courtesy of Lyles & King.

15. “Dead Eden” at Lyles & King

Many of the artists in this politically charged summer group show, which looks at humanity’s self-destructive impulses, have never shown work outside of Europe. The title is meant to suggest a lost utopia—or that perhaps Eve’s apple had a worm buried inside it all along. Featured artists include Ivana Bašić, France-Lise McGurn, Sanam Khatibi, Chris Dorland, and Vivian Greven.

Location: Lyles & King, 106 Forsyth Street at Broome
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Friday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m. and by appointment

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Sunday, August 12

Scott Indrisek, Wife (2018). Courtesy of carriage trade.

16. Social Photography VI at carriage trade

The sixth straight edition of carriage trade’s annual Social Photography show brings together smartphone photos from hundreds of art-world cognoscenti, well-known and not, from artists to editors to curators and so on. The images—inkjet-printed at 5×7 inches in editions of 10—are also available for sale. Nowhere else can you get original works by Louise Lawler and Tracy Emin for $75. All sales will go towards programming at the nonprofit next year.

Location: carriage trade, 277 Grand St, 2nd Floor
Price: Free
Time: Wednesday–Sunday, 1 p.m.–6 p.m.

—Taylor Dafoe


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