Editors’ Picks: 9 Things to See in New York This Week

Here's what we're excited about this week.

Nora Berman, Double energy vampire (spiraling), 2017. Courtesy of Downs & Ross.
Nora Berman, Double energy vampire (spiraling), 2017. Courtesy of Downs & Ross.

Each week, we search New York City for the most exciting, and thought-provoking, shows, screenings, and events. See them below.

Tuesday, July 25

Trevor Paglen, <i>They Watch the Moon</i> (2010). Image © Trevor Paglen.

Trevor Paglen, They Watch the Moon (2010). Image © Trevor Paglen.

1. Summer of Know: Trevor Paglen and Ben Wizner at the Guggenheim Museum
Nat Trotman, Curator of performance and media at the museum, will moderate a discussion between the artist Trevor Paglen and Ben Wizner of the ACLU. The discussion will be focused on the state of media and privacy in America, addressing “surveillance and civil liberties in the age of hacking.”

Location: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Cafe 3, 1071 Fifth Avenue
Price: Free with $25, museum admission, space is limited
Time: 6:30 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein 

Wednesday, July 26–Sunday, September 3

Jamie Warren, “One Sweet Day.” Image courtesy of the artist and The Hole, NYC.

2. “Jamie Warren: One Sweet Day” at the Hole
In the vein of Cindy Sherman, Jamie Warren plays with her identity using costumes and makeup, creating elaborate stage designs in which she acts and performs. For this show, Warren will install four video works and will set up an immersive set in the back gallery. A performance will take place August 17th.

Location: The Hole, 312 Bowery
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception: 6 p.m.–9 p.m.; Wednesday–Sunday, 12 p.m.–7 p.m., or by appointment

—Caroline Goldstein 

Wednesday, July 26–Sunday, September 3

Shirah Dedman, Phoebe Dedman, and Luz Myles visiting Shreveport, Louisiana, where in 1912 their relative Thomas Miles, Sr., was lynched (2017). Courtesy of Rog Walker and Bee Walker for the Equal Justice Initiative.

Shirah Dedman, Phoebe Dedman, and Luz Myles visiting Shreveport, Louisiana, where in 1912 their relative Thomas Miles, Sr., was lynched (2017). Courtesy of Rog Walker and Bee Walker for the Equal Justice Initiative.

3. “The Legacy of Lynching: Confronting Racial Terror in America” at the Brooklyn Museum
The Equal Justice Initiative (EJI) shares its research into the history of lynchings, from the abolition of slavery to in this exhibition organization in collaboration with Google, in the hope of encouraging conversations about our country’s legacy of racial injustice. The show also previews EJI’s national monument to lynching victims, titled The Memorial to Peace and Justice, which will open in Montgomery, Alabama, in 2018, alongside the planned From Enslavement to Mass Incarceration museum.

Location: Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn
Price: $16
Time: Thursday, 6 p.m.–10 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m.–8 p.m.; Wednesday and Sunday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, July 27–Friday, September 1

L: Josh Rowell's <i>Data Mining: Pseudocode 1</i> (2016). R: Tom McFarland's <i>727 Carlsbad Cavers Highway 2</i> (2016). Courtesy of UNIX Gallery.

L: Josh Rowell’s Data Mining: Pseudocode 1 (2016). R: Tom McFarland’s 727 Carlsbad Cavers Highway 2 (2016). Courtesy of UNIX Gallery.

4. “New Territory” at UNIX Gallery
UNIX Gallery presents a two-person show, featuring contemporary artists Josh Rowell and Tom McFarland. The artists both address themes of communication, but they tackle the subjects using completely different media. Rowell’s work is more focused on technology, using the visual language of pixels and binary code to articulate his subject. McFarland’s work is decidedly more analog, creating cobweb-like patterns using string and resin.

Location: UNIX Gallery, 532 West 24th Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein

Friday, July 28

Emory Douglas. © 2017 Emory Douglas/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Emory Douglas. © 2017 Emory Douglas/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

5. Silent Protest Art Walk at Bryant Park
Organized by Kindred Arts in collaboration with the NAACP and Inside Out, the 2017 Silent Protest Art Walk marks the one-hundred-year anniversary of the anti-race riot protest in Bryant Park held by W.E.B. Dubois and the NAACP in 1917. This year’s event is an opportunity for the art world to silently decry the recent rise of fear-mongering bigotry and prejudice across the world.

Location: Bryant Park
Price: Free
Time: 5 p.m.–7 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Friday, July 28–Sunday, September 17

Laurie Simmons, Tatiana (Green), 2015. Courtesy of the New York Academy of Art.

Laurie Simmons, Tatiana (Green), 2015. Courtesy of the New York Academy of Art.

6. “About Face” at the Southhampton Arts Center
The New York Academy of Art had enlisted musician and painter Scott Avett, of the Avett Brothers, to co-curate this portraiture exhibition with school president David Kratz. It’s the institution’s second-ever outing in the Hamptons, featuring an all-star cast of artists including Jean-Michel Basquiat, Will Cotton, Nicole EisenmanEric FischlAlex KatzAlice NeelDana Schutz, Cindy Sherman, Laurie Simmons, and Mickalene Thomas. In response to the increasing prevalence of the selfie, the show encourages “viewers to slow down and consider the story inherent in every human face.”

Location: Southampton Arts Center, 25 Jobs Lane, Southampton
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Thursday–Sunday, 12 p.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Saturday, July 29

John Giorno’s “Dial-A-Poem” (1970). Photo by Gianfranco Mantegna, © John Giorno, courtesy of John Giorno Archive.

7. Ugo Rondinone: I ♥ John Giorno | Dial-A-Poem-Marathon at Red Bull Arts New York
A continuation of this summer’s celebration of John Giorno, Red Bull Arts is resurrecting the artwork created by Giorno between 1969 and 1971. In the original project, a series of phone lines connected to answering machines that contained recordings from artists, poets, and musicians. In this new iteration, a group of cultural figures will recite text, read poems, and perform live.

Location: Red Bull Arts, 220 West 18th Street (ground level)
Price: Free
Time: 12 p.m.–7 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein 

Through Thursday, August 17

Jon Henry, <em>Nefertit</em> from the series "Stranger Fruit." Courtesy of Aperture.

Jon Henry, Nefertit from the series “Stranger Fruit.” Courtesy of Aperture.

8. “2017 Aperture Summer Open: On Freedom” at Aperture Gallery
For Freedoms, Hank Willis Thomas and Eric Gottesman’s artist-run super PAC has curated Aperture’s summer exhibition, in which photographers were invited to respond to Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms: freedom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom from want, and freedom from fear.

The selection of images, chosen from an open call, “demonstrates how the democratic nature of photography can serve as a vehicle for diverse perspectives to visualize social problems, spark dialogue, and transform assumptions,” according to For Freedom’s curatorial statement.

Location: Aperture Gallery, 547 West 27th Street, 4th Floor
Price: Free
Time: Monday–Thursday and Saturday, 10:00 a.m.–5:30 p.m.; Friday, 10:00 a.m.–2:00 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Through Friday, August 11

"Nora Berman: POWER SUCCESS MAGIC DREAM" (2017) at Downs & Ross, installation view. Courtesy of Downs & Ross.

“Nora Berman: POWER SUCCESS MAGIC DREAM” (2017) at Downs & Ross, installation view. Courtesy of Downs & Ross.

9. “Nora Berman: POWER SUCCESS MAGIC DREAM” at Downs & Ross
Nora Berman’s colorful visions evoke magical transformations, otherworldly figures being born of her artistic consciousness. These vibrant paintings are paired with plasters sculptures, a handful of coins at the bottom of a resin puddle, a blackened crater like a wishing well on the surface of a dead planet.

Location: Downs & Ross, 55 Chrystie Street, #203, and 106 Eldridge Street
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Friday, 12 p.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone


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