Editors’ Picks: 19 Things Not to Miss in New York’s Art World This Week

This week is your last chance to visit MoMA until October.

Hiroya Kurata, Buddies (2019). Courtesy Monya Rowe Gallery.
Hiroya Kurata, Buddies (2019). Courtesy Monya Rowe Gallery.

Each week, we search New York City for the most exciting and thought-provoking shows, screenings, and events. See them below. 

 

Tuesday, June 11

Annibale Carracci, <i>Shepherd with Pipes, and Two Dancing Children; Virgin and Child with Heads of Four Spectators</i>. Pen and brown ink on paper.

Annibale Carracci, Shepherd with Pipes, and Two Dancing Children; Virgin and Child with Heads of Four Spectators. Pen and brown ink on paper. Photo: Morgan Library.

1. “Annibale Carracci at the Morgan: Drawings from the Artist’s Final Period” at the Morgan Library

If there is one underrated Baroque artist who deserves a biopic, it’s Annibale Carracci (1560–1609). The artist became one of Rome’s most sought-after talents after he unveiled his frescoes in the Palazzo Farnese in 1604. But he suffered a severe mental and physical breakdown the following year and became unable to take on new large-scale projects. Little of the work he made late in life is known. But at the Morgan’s annual Thaw Lecture on Tuesday, Carel van Tuyll van Serooskerken, the former director of graphic arts at the Louvre, will delve into the artist’s underrated late drawings and offer a new perspective on this Renaissance master.

Location: The Morgan Library, 225 Madison Avenue
Price: $15; free for museum members and students with a valid ID
Time: 6:30 p.m.

Julia Halperin

 

Juan Sanchez, <em>Bleeding Reality: Así estamos (Realidad Sangrante: As We Are)</em>, 1988. Courtesy of El Museo del Barrio.

Juan Sanchez, Bleeding Reality: Así estamos (Realidad Sangrante: As We Are), 1988. Courtesy of El Museo del Barrio.

2. “Museum Mile” on Fifth Avenue

For the 41st year, the Museum Mile turns Fifth Avenue into a free, open air art party, with complimentary entry to seven of the city’s best museums, between East 82nd and 105th Streets. Highlight will include the opening of the second part of El Museo del Barrio’s 50th anniversary exhibition, featuring over 80 artists and exploring the institution’s efforts to celebrate Puerto Rican and Latin American culture.

Location: Fifth Avenue, between East 82nd and 105th Streets
Price: Free
Time: 6 p.m.–9 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Tuesday, June 11–Sunday, August 17

Athi-Patra Ruga, Umesiyakazi in Waiting, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and WHATIFTHEWORLD. Photo: Hayden Phipps

Athi-Patra Ruga, Umesiyakazi in Waiting (2015). Courtesy of the artist and WHATIFTHEWORLD. Photo: Hayden Phipps

3. “Radical Love” at Ford Foundation Gallery

This show, which includes more than 20 artist such as Faith Ringgold and Rashaad Newsome, focuses on love in the broadest sense. The exhibition is the second in a trilogy of shows that look at race, gender, violence, and class, and offers the suggestion that “love [is] the answer to a world in peril.”

Location: Ford Foundation, 320 East 43rd Street
Price: Free
Time: Monday–Saturday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Nan Stewart

 

Tuesday, June 11–October 2019

The Elsewhere rooftop. Photo courtesy of Elsewhere.

The Elsewhere rooftop. Photo courtesy of Elsewhere.

4. “Landscape” at Elsewhere

Brooklyn music venue Elsewhere is unveiling new works of art by artists Bread Face, Zoe Burke, Dani Bonnet, Grace Miceli, and gloflo in a program led by art director Molly Surno. Candace Moeller, associate director at Cristin Tierney Gallery in New York, is also curating a selection of films for a pop-up movie theater at the space, while perfumer Marissa Zappas, Elsewhere’s first artist-in-residence, will create custom fragrances to “scent” the venue.

Location: Elsewhere, 599 Johnson Avenue, Brooklyn
Price: Varies based on event; reception is free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–9 p.m.; regular viewing hours vary based on events

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Wednesday, June 12

Rachel Rossin, <em>Recursive Truth</em> (2019). Courtesy of Phillips.

Rachel Rossin, Recursive Truth (2019). Courtesy of Phillips.

5. “Phillips x Daata Presents Rachel Rossin” at Phillips

Phillips and Daata have commissioned a new video work by Rachel Rossin based on generative AI research. The digital artwork, Recursive Truth, appears to be a video game, but a built-in bug destroys the gameplay, offering a surprisingly effective commentary on the nature of truth and memory.

Location: Phillips, 450 Park Avenue
Price: Free (RSVP for reception)
Time: 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; reception Tuesday, June 11, 6:30 p.m.–8 p.m.

—Nan Stewart

 

A display at Lonely Whale's Museum of Plastic. Photo by Craig Barritt/Getty Images for Lonely Whale.

A display at Lonely Whale’s Museum of Plastic. Photo by Craig Barritt/Getty Images for Lonely Whale.

6. The Museum of Plastic at 473 Broadway

Actor Adrian Grenier founded advocacy group the Lonely Whale to help protect the ocean from pollution. Now, the organization has harnessed the power of the vital pop-up museum to drive home the fact that our world is choking on single use plastic—consider, for instance, the fact that the world buys one million disposable plastic water bottles every minute. Colorful, Instagrammable artworks at the space (such as a whale tale constructed from Ever & Ever aluminum canned water, one of Lonely Whale’s preferred alternatives to plastic water bottles) hope to spread awareness of this important issue—and unlike pop-ups dedicated to everything from ice cream to rose wine, this one is free.

Location: The Museum of Plastic, 473 Broadway
Price: Free
Time: 11 a.m.–7 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Wednesday, June 12–Friday, July 12

Work by Dragon76. Courtesy of Compound Gallery.

Work by Dragon76. Courtesy of Compound Gallery.

7. “Dragon76: Coexist” at Compound Gallery

Japanese street artist Dragon76 is having a show at a South Bronx auto-body repair shop-turned art gallery. Opened in October by Mos Def and Free Richardson (it’s an offshoot of his creative advertising business of the same name), the Compound has a distinct hip-hop bent, and the show’s opening-night party is sponsored by Jagermeister.

Location: Compound Gallery, 2422 Third Avenue, Mott Haven, the Bronx
Price: Free (RSVP for opening reception)
Time: Opening reception, 7 p.m.–10 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 12 p.m.–5 p.m. or by appointment

—Tanner West

 

Thursday, June 13

Matt Keegan, <em>what was & what is</em> (2019) installation view, Court Square Park, Long Island City, New York. Photo by Kyle Knodell courtesy the artist and Altman Siegel, San Francisco.

Matt Keegan, what was & what is (2019) installation view, Court Square Park, Long Island City, New York. Photo by Kyle Knodell courtesy the artist and Altman Siegel, San Francisco.

8. “Matt Keegan: what was & what is (II)” at Court Square Park

For SculptureCenter’s summer public art installation, “Matt Keegan: what was & what is,” the artist has placed a empty glass box atop an existing concrete expanse. The floor features a photograph of the interior of a nearby one-bedroom apartment, for rent at $3,500–3,700 a month. Also this week, the artist continues conversations with his father at the site of the artwork, discussing people and topics such as Robert Moses, urban development, and Keegan’s experiences as a bar owner in Long Island City.

Location: Court Square Park, Court Square and Jackson Avenue, Long Island City, Queens
Price: Free
Time: 6 p.m.–7 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, June 14–Sunday, June 23

Work by Bat-Ami Rivlin. Photo courtesy of Bahnhof.

Work by Bat-Ami Rivlin. Photo courtesy of Bahnhof.

9. “Landmarks” at Bahnhof

Ekaterina Soriano has founded a new itinerant Brooklyn gallery called Bahnhof, curating the inaugural exhibition. The group show, featuring Greg Allen-Müller, Alexander Muret, and Bat-Ami Rivlin, offers works that appear to be based on public urban structures, but appear to have outlived their original function.

Location: Bahnhof, 55-59 Kent Ave
Price: Free, RSVP for opening reception
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–9 p.m.; 11 a.m.–7 p.m.

—Tanner West

 

Friday, June 14

Su Negrin, graphic designer; Suzanne Bevier, artist; Peter Hujar, photographer, <em>Gay Liberation</em>, New York: Times Change Press (1970). Courtesy of the Graphics Collection, the Lesbian Herstory Archives.

Su Negrin, graphic designer; Suzanne Bevier, artist; Peter Hujar, photographer, Gay Liberation, New York: Times Change Press (1970). Courtesy of the Graphics Collection, the Lesbian Herstory Archives.

10. “Sketch & Sip: Craft Your Own Protest Art” at the New-York Historical Society

Get ready for New York’s Pride Parade, taking place June 30, by creating protest-inspired posters and artworks based on the imagery from “Stonewall 50 at New-York Historical Society,” on view through September 22. Your ticket comes with wine, cheese, and art supplies.

Location: New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West, at West 77th Street
Price: $20
Time: 6:30 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Friday, June 14–Saturday, June 15

Still from a work by Eva Papamargariti. Courtesy of the artist.

Still from a work by Eva Papamargariti. Courtesy of the artist.

11. “Software for Artists Day” at Pioneer Works

Back for its fifth year, “Software for Artists Day” will see artists, technologists, and activists grappling with the issue of digital colonialism through a series of talks, workshops, and demos. Francis Tseng, a specialist in simulations, will take the mic for Friday’s keynote address, while new-media luminaries such as Eva Papamargariti, ann haeyoung, and LaTurbo Avedon explore new territory in individual presentations on Saturday. The festivities will close with a pair of performances by artist Sarah Viviana Valdez.

Location: Pioneer Works, 159 Pioneer Street, Red Hook, Brooklyn
Price: $25
Time: Friday, 7 p.m.–10 p.m.; Saturday, 9:30 a.m.–7 p.m.

—Tim Schneider

 

Friday, June 14–Saturday, July 13

Actress and artist Kathrine Narducci in her studio. Photo courtesy of Site:Brooklyn.

Actress and artist Kathrine Narducci in her studio. Photo courtesy of Site:Brooklyn.

12. “Katherine & Kathrine” at Site:Brooklyn Gallery

Actress Kathrine Narducci, who had roles in The Sopranos and A Bronx Tale, will again appear in a film about organized crime in Martin Scorsese’s upcoming The Irishman. First, however, she’s got a two-person gallery show in Gowanus, Brooklyn, with Katherine McMahon, creative director of ARTnews magazine. Both artists’ paintings consider the stereotypes surrounding prescribed gender roles, presenting masculinity and femininity as a duality through portraits and self-portraits.

Location: Site:Brooklyn Gallery, 165 7th Street, Brooklyn
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Friday, June 14–Sunday, October 15

Ângela Ferreira, For Mozambique (Model No. 1 of Screen-Tribute-Kiosk Celebrating a Post-Independence Utopia), (2008). Courtesy the artist. Photo: Luís Colaço.

Ângela Ferreira, For Mozambique (Model No. 1 of Screen-Tribute-Kiosk Celebrating a Post-Independence Utopia) (2008). Courtesy the artist. Photo: Luís Colaço.

13. “After The End: Timing Socialism in Contemporary African Art” at the Wallach Art Gallery at Columbia University

After gaining independence from colonial powers throughout the mid-20th century, young Socialist African nations underwent waves of turmoil precipitated, in part, by the end of the Cold War. This exhibition marks the first in North America to explore aesthetic responses to these histories. The show is curated by Álvaro Luís Lima, a Ph.D. candidate in Columbia’s department of art history and archaeology, where he specializes in modern and contemporary art from Africa. The show includes works by artists such as Filipe Branquinho, Filipa Cesar, Julie Mehretu, and Nástia Mosquito, whose artworks explore the rise and fall of socialism in countries including Angola, Ethiopia, and Mozambique.

Location: Lenfest Center for the Arts, 615 West 129th Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception 6–8 p.m.; Wednesday–Friday 12–8 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday 12 p.m.–6 p.m.; Monday–Tuesday closed

—Eileen Kinsella

 

Through Saturday, June 15

Hiroya Kurata, Like a Rollercoaster, 2019. Courtesy of Monya Rowe Gallery.

14. “Hiroya Kurata: Union Street” at Monya Rowe Gallery

After seeing his work at the Spring/Break art fair, Hiroya Kurata’s solo exhibition at Monya Rowe Gallery has been on my must-see list since it was first announced. Conveniently located by Penn Station and depicting comforting yet extraordinary scenes of parenthood and everyday life, this exhibition is perfect for a Father’s Day weekend visit.

Location: Monya Rowe Gallery, 224 West 30th Street, #1005
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 12 p.m.–6 p.m.

—Cristina Cruz

 

Through Saturday, June 15

"David Shrigley: FLUFF WAR" installation view at Anton Kern Gallery. Photo courtesy of Anton Kern Gallery.

“David Shrigley: FLUFF WAR” installation view at Anton Kern Gallery. Photo courtesy of Anton Kern Gallery.

15. “David Shrigley: FLUFF WAR” at Anton Kern Gallery

David Shrigley has made 100 new drawings for his current show at Anton Kern, plus two works in neon and a large-scale kinetic sculpture that resembles an air hockey table with fluff instead of pucks. Unlike the beloved arcade game, this nonsensical piece, with the fluff controlled by fans, will have no clear winners or losers.

Location: Anton Kern Gallery, 16 East 55th Street
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Visitors in the galleries at the Museum of Modern Art with Vincent van Gogh's <em>The Starry Night</em> (1889). Photo by Martin Seck, ©2017 the Museum of Modern Art.

Visitors in the galleries at the Museum of Modern Art with Vincent van Gogh’s The Starry Night (1889). Photo by Martin Seck, ©2017 the Museum of Modern Art.

16. The Permanent Collection at the Museum of Modern Art

In preparation for its long-awaited expansion, MoMA will close until October 20 beginning Sunday, making this week your last chance to see the permanent collection hang in its current configuration. (In large part, it dates all the way back to 2004 and the unveiling of the last expansion, from Yoshio Taniguchi.) The museum promises that all the heavy hitters will be back come fall, but they’ll be shown in an entirely new display that aims to tell the story of Modern art with greater diversity—and approximately 1,000 more artworks than before.

Location: MoMA, West 53rd Street
Price: $25 general admission
Time: Monday–Thursday, 10:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.; Friday, 10:30 a.m.–8 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Saturday June 29

Asya Geisberg Ariadne Unraveling

Installation view of “Ariadne Unraveling” at Asya Geisberg, 2019. Courtesy of Asya Geisberg.

17. “Ariadne Unraveling” at Asya Geisberg Gallery

In the Greek myth, the besotted Cretan Princess Ariadne leads Theseus, the object of her affections, from the Minotaur’s labyrinth to freedom with a piece of thread. In this delightful exhibition at Asya Geisberg Gallery, we see eight women artists also using thread to its fullest potential, taking weaving, tapestry, embroidery, and more to often unexpected ends. Sophia Narrett’s rapturous small-scale embroideries of sexual rendezvous are a particular favorite, appearing as organic objects, dripping with threads as though they were tendrils of vine.

Location: Asya Geisberg, 537B West 23rd Street
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Katie White

 

Through Sunday, July 7

"Shervone

18. “Shervone Neckles: Provenance” at FiveMyles

Fresh off her turn co-representing Grenada at this year’s Venice Biennale, New York-based artist Shervone Neckles will present a new series of unique prints. Each depicts a floating figure wearing a house atop its head, a recreation of the artist’s own family home. Though what the house represents—a headdress, perhaps, or maybe a mask—ultimately remains unclear. I explore concepts of past and present-day colonialism, and notions of provenance as [they] relates to origin, authorship, and ownership,” Neckles explains in a statement for the show.

Location: FiveMyles, 558 St Johns Place, Brooklyn
Price: Free
Time:  Thursday–Sunday, 1 p.m.– 6 p.m.

—Taylor Dafoe

 

Through Thursday, July 25

Christina Kruse, Matrose (2019).

19. “Christina Kruse: Base and Balance” at Helwaser Gallery

Helwaser Gallery presents a solo exhibition by German artist Christina Kruse. The exhibition is made up of sculptures and works on paper, Minimalist in nature, and consisting of “rectilinear forms… counterbalanced with rounded spheres.” Though abstract, the rounded shapes of the sculptures are reminiscent of human heads.

Location: Helwaser Gallery, 833 Madison Avenue, 3rd Floor
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Neha Jambhekar


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