Editors’ Picks: 17 Things Not to Miss in New York’s Art World This Week

Check out Roz Chast, Tom Sachs, Jennifer Packer, and much more.

Hilma af Klint, AptarpiecesL Group X, No. 1, Altarpiece (1915). © Stiftelsen Hilma af Klints Verk.
Hilma af Klint, AptarpiecesL Group X, No. 1, Altarpiece (1915). © Stiftelsen Hilma af Klints Verk.

Each week, we search New York City for the most exciting and thought-provoking shows, screenings, and events. See them below.

 

Tuesday, November 27

Installation view of "Carmen Argote: Warm Is a New Black." Photo courtesy of Ballon Rouge Collective.

Installation view of “Carmen Argote: Warm Is a New Black.” Photo courtesy of Ballon Rouge Collective.

1. “Carmen Argote: Warm Is a Black” at Ballon Rouge Collective

For Ballon Rouge Collective’s first show in New York, the group has enlisted Mexican artist Carmen Argote to live and work in East Harlem for a month. The resulting show, curated by Kathy Battista, features Argote’s explorations of natural dyes made from materials such as onion, chilies, hibiscus, and mustard. There are works on paper made with cochineal dye and a unique mix of oil paint and avocado, which Argote makes while kneeling on the floor, as well as sculptural fabric pieces, dyed by pressing sponges, drenched in iron and avocado, in a tortilla press.

Location: Ballon Rouge Collective, 345 East 104th Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–9 p.m.; Wednesday–Sunday, 2 p.m.–8 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

The cover of Rachel Corbett’s book You Must Change Your Life. Photo: WW Norton.

 

2. “You Must Change Your Life: The Story of Rainer Maria Rilke and Auguste Rodin” at the National Arts Club

artnet News’s own deputy editor, Rachel Corbett, will talk about her award-winning bookYou Must Change Your Life, at the National Arts Club. The meticulously researched dual biography takes place in Paris at the turn of the century and recounts the unlikely friendship between poet Rainer Maria Rilke, then in his 20s and struggling to find his voice, and sculptor Auguste Rodin, who was in his 60s and already famous. A book-signing will follow the discussion.

Location: National Arts Club, 15 Gramercy Park South
Price: Free
Time: 8 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Wednesday, November 28

Roz Chast, <em>Self Portrait</em>. Courtesy of the artist.

Roz Chast, Self Portrait. Courtesy of the artist.

3. “An Evening With Roz Chast” at SVA Theater

Roz Chast will give a talk on the occasion of her retrospective exhibition “The Masters Series: Roz Chast,” on view through December 15. The show (which will also have an opening reception on November 29 from 6 p.m.–8 p.m., at SVA Chelsea Gallery, 601 West 26th Street, 15th Floor) includes a new mural, images from her 20 books, as well as never-before-seen cartooning and illustration work, and the artist’s high school notebooks.

Location: SVA Theatre, 333 West 23rd Street
Price: Free
Time: 7 p.m.–9 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Wednesday, November 28–Saturday, January 12, 2019

Vaughn Spann, <em>A moment for you and I</em> 2018). Courtesy of Half Gallery.

Vaughn Spann, A moment for you and I 2018). Courtesy of Half Gallery.

4. “Vaughn Spann: Orange, Yellow, Purple, Blue Skies” at Half Gallery

This month, Half Gallery is giving Vaughn Spann his first New York solo show. In December, the gallery will feature the artist’s paintings, which include both social abstraction and figurative work, at Art Basel in Miami Beach.

Location: Half Gallery, 43 East 78th Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 7 p.m.–9 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 12 p.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Wednesday, November 28–Sunday, January 20, 2019

Installation view of “Penelope Umbrico: Monument” (2018) at BRIC. Photo courtesy of the artist and BRIC.

Installation view of “Penelope Umbrico: Monument” (2018) at BRIC. Photo courtesy of the artist and BRIC.

5. “Penelope Umbrico: Monument” at BRIC

In Penelope Umbrico’s “Monument,” an interactive exhibition and residency at the BRIC House in downtown Brooklyn, a stack of black, broken TVs and computer monitors lean against the far gallery wall displaying the news. Evoking the jagged silhouette of a city skyline, the screens’ arrangement underscores both the “monolithic state” of technology today and the speed with which that technology becomes outdated. Meanwhile, behind the wall is what Umbrico calls a “knolling table,” where gallery-goers can take their old electronic devices to be dismantled and turned into a photograph.

Location: BRIC, 647 Fulton Street, Brooklyn
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 7 p.m.–9 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; Sunday 12 p.m.–6 p.m.

—Taylor Dafoe

 

Wednesday, November 28–Sunday, January 6

Jane Kaplowitz, These Monkeys Like to Get Fucked Up the Ass. Courtesy of the Fortnight Institute.

Jane Kaplowitz, These Monkeys Like to Get Fucked Up the Ass. Courtesy of the Fortnight Institute.

6. “Jane Kaplowitz: RSVP Jane Rosenblum (1977–2018)” at Fortnight Institute

For her first solo show in 19 years, Jane Kaplowitz is presenting paintings and works on paper, many of which are repurposed invitations, menus, and other assorted ephemera from art world events. An insider who hosted dinner parties for the art world cognoscenti with her husband, the late art historian Robert Rosenblum, Kaplowitz nevertheless downplays her own stature by calling herself a “super fan girl of the art world.”

Location: Fortnight Institute, 60 East 4th Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Wednesday, 11 a.m.–7 p.m.; Thursday–Saturday, 1 p.m.–7 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, November 29

Eileen Myles, <em>Evolution</em>. Courtesy of Grove Atlantic.

Eileen Myles, Evolution. Courtesy of Grove Atlantic.

7. “Eileen Myles: poems” at Bridget Donahue

Bridget Donahue hosts the opening reception for poet Eileen Myles, who has taken photographs of everyday objects to complement her new collection of poetry, Evolution. The book’s cover features an Instagram photo taken by Myles that she describes in her artist’s statement as “the window of my apartment where I write about art, Honey [her rescued pitbull], and our way through New York.”

Location: Bridget Donahue, 99 Bowery
Price: Free
Time: 6 p.m.–9 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

<EM>Conversations about Sculpture</em> by Hal Foster and Richard Serra. Courtesy of Yale University Press.

Conversations about Sculpture by Hal Foster and Richard Serra. Courtesy of Yale University Press.

8. “Hal Foster on Richard Serra: Conversations About Sculpture” at 192 Books

In a new book from Yale University Press, artist Richard Serra and art critic Hal Foster share 15 years worth of musings on sculpture, ranging from the sculptor’s inspirations—Donatello, Machu Picchu, and Brancusi, to name a few—to his early work in steel mills. In celebration of the volume’s publication, the two giants of art history will discuss their many discussions.

Location: 192 Books, 192 10th Avenue
Price: Free
Time: 7 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Installation view of "Matt Taber: the world is yours if you are real” at the Chimney. Photo by Hirofumi Kariya courtesy of the Chimney.

Installation view of “Matt Taber: the world is yours if you are real” at the Chimney. Photo by Hirofumi Kariya, courtesy of the Chimney.

9. “The Cloud, Eros and the Technological Sublime” at the Chimney

On the occasion of his current show “the world is yours if you are real,” on view at the Chimney through December 16, artist Matt Taber will talk with art theorist Barbara Reisinger about how the traditional definition of physical, atmospheric clouds is being subsumed by the digital cloud, which is used to store data.

Location: The Chimney, 200 Morgan Avenue
Price: Free
Time: 7 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, November 29 and Friday, November 30

Hilma af Klint, Untitled Series: group IV, the Ten Largest, No. 7, Adulthood (1907). © Stiftelsen Hilma af Klints Verk.

Hilma af Klint, Untitled Series: group IV, the Ten Largest, No. 7, Adulthood (1907). © Stiftelsen Hilma af Klints Verk.

10. “Music for the Temple: A Tribute to Hilma af Klint by John Zorn” at the Guggenheim Museum

The Guggenheim rotunda will serve as a concert venue this week with composer John Zorn presenting new music inspired by the visionary, spiritually inspired paintings of Hilma af Klint. The ticket also includes the opportunity to see “Hilma af Klint: Paintings for the Future,” on view through April 23, 2019, after hours.

Location: Guggenheim Museum, 1071 5th Avenue
Price: $30
Time: 7 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, November 29–Saturday, January 19, 2019

Jennifer Packer, <em>Tia</em> (2017). This painting was included in the artist's recent show at Chicago's Renaissance Society. Photo courtesy of the artist.

Jennifer Packer, Tia (2017). This painting was included in the artist’s recent show at Chicago’s Renaissance Society. Photo courtesy of the artist.

11. “Jennifer Packer: Quality of Life” at Sikkema Jenkins & Co

For her second New York solo show, Jennifer Packer presents a selection of paintings, including both figurative work, featuring friends and family members, and floral still lifes that serve as meditations on grief and trauma.

Location: Sikkema Jenkins & Co., 530 West 22nd Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Friday, November 30

Andy Warhol, <em>Otto Fenn(</em> (circa 1952). Collection of Joe Donnelly. © 2018 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc/Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Andy Warhol, Otto Fenn( (circa 1952). Collection of Joe Donnelly. © 2018 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc/Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

12. “Becoming Queer: Warhol in the 1950s and Jerrett Robert Austin’s Camille (1953)” at the Whitney Museum of American Art

Many critics have noted that the Whitney’s celebrated Warhol extravaganza, “Andy Warhol—From A to B and Back Again” (through March 31, 2019), explores lesser-known elements of the Pop artist’s oeuvre, including his homoerotic drawings and portraits of men in drag from the 1960s. On Friday, two art historians—Nina Schleif and Trevor Fairbrother—will have a conversation about Warhol’s depiction of queer desire and gay subculture during the McCarthy era. After the talk, the Whitney will screen Jerett Robert Austin’s Camille, a drag parody of the 1936 film that retells Alexandre Dumas’s 19th-century novel of the same name. The plot—about a French courtesan fighting off tuberculosis while a younger man tries to steal her away from a rich baron—may also be familiar to fans of the considerably less underground 2001 film version of the story, Moulin Rouge.

Location: The Whitney Museum of American Art’s Susan and John Hess Family Gallery and Theater, 99 Gansevoort Street
Price: $12 for adults, $10 for members, students and seniors
Time: 6:30 p.m.

—Julia Halperin

 

Shelly Silver, <em>A Strange New Beauty</em> (2017), film still. Image courtesy of the artist.

Shelly Silver, A Strange New Beauty (2017), film still. Image courtesy of the artist.

13. “Shelly Silver: A Strange New Beauty” at Microscope Gallery

Shelly Silver’s film A Strange New Beauty, which debuted at Cinéma du Réel in Paris last year, is now getting its New York debut. The 50-minute piece, with its still images of wealthy homes in Silicon Valley, looks to answer the question, “What is our current definition of beauty and where is this definition leading us?” A Q&A with the artist will follow the screening.

Location: Microscope Gallery, 1329 Willoughby Avenue, 2B, Brooklyn
Price: $8
Time: 7:30 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Saturday, December 1

"Alternate Endings, Activist Risings." Courtesy of Visual AIDS.

“Alternate Endings, Activist Risings.” Courtesy of Visual AIDS.

14. Day Without Art “Alternate Endings, Activist Risings” at various locations

In 1989, Visual AIDS organized the first Day Without Art, calling on the art world to commemorate those who had died from the deadly disease in a day of “mourning and action in response to the AIDS crisis.” This year’s programming for the occasion includes a new art project commissioned by Visual AIDS titled “Alternate Endings, Activist Risings.” It’s a series of short videos by community organizations ACT UP NY, Positive Women’s Network, Sero Project, the SPOT, Tacoma Action Collective, and VOCAL NY, and it will screen at several venues across the country in December. The official premiere is on December 1 at New York’s SVA Theater at 7:30 p.m.; the New Museum will screen it that day, hourly 11 a.m.–6 p.m.; and you can catch it that night at 8 p.m. and 9 p.m. at the Brooklyn Museum.

Location: Various locations
Price: Varies
Time: Varies

—Sarah Cascone

 

Jannis Kounellis, <em>Untitled</em> (2013), installation view at Salone degli Incanti Ex Pescheria, Trieste. Artwork ©Jannis Kounellis. Photo courtesy of Phaidon.

Jannis Kounellis, Untitled (2013), installation view at Salone degli Incanti Ex Pescheria, Trieste. Artwork ©Jannis Kounellis. Photo courtesy of Phaidon.

15. “Jannis Kounellis Monograph Launch and Conversation” at Magazzino Italian Art Foundation

In celebration of Phaidon’s release of the new definitive Jannis Kounellis (1936–2017) monograph, the publishing house is teaming up with Arte Povera art space Magazzino to host a reception honoring the late artist. The afternoon will feature a conversationwith curator Philip Larratt-Smith, the book’s author, and Magazzino’s new scholar-in-residence, Francesco Guzzetti. There is a shuttle to pick up visitors at the Cold Spring Metro North station.

Location: Magazzino Italian Art Foundation, 2700 Route 9, Cold Spring
Price: Free with RSVP
Time: 3:30 p.m.–5 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Saturday, December 1–Saturday, December 8

"Tom Sachs: Sandcrawler." Photo courtesy of Vito Schnabel.

“Tom Sachs: Sandcrawler.” Photo courtesy of Tom Sachs Studio and Vito Schnabel Projects.

16. “Tom Sachs: Sandcrawler” at Vito Schnabel Projects

Art dealer Vito Schnabel is planning a big Tom Sachs show for his gallery based in St. Moritz, Switzerland, in late December, but New Yorkers can get an early taste with this one-week pop up in the West Village.

Location: Vito Schnabel Projects, 43 Clarkson Street
Price: Free
Time: Monday–Saturday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Saturday, December 15

Jake Kean Mayman, <i>Sandino's Mark</i>, 2018. Photography by Michael Underwood. Image courtesy of the artist and Stellar Projects.

Jake Kean Mayman, Sandino’s Mark, 2018. Photography by Michael Underwood. Image courtesy of the artist and Stellar Projects.

17. “Jake Kean Mayman: Existing Structures” at Stellar Projects

In his New York debut, Los Angeles-based artist Jake Kean Mayman presents a series of technically bewitching and politically charged paintings that allude to the US’s long-running, corporation-enriching interventions in Central America. His depictions of figures on all sides of the issue, from Ronald Reagan’s influential astrologer Joan Quigley (yes, really) to freedom fighters in nations like Panama, remind us that today’s regional instabilities are, in a very real sense, America’s just desserts for yesterday’s profit-driven adventurism.

Location: Stellar Projects, 1 Rivington Street
Price: Free
Time: Friday–Saturday, noon–6 p.m. and by appointment

—Tim Schneider


Follow artnet News on Facebook:


Want to stay ahead of the art world? Subscribe to our newsletter to get the breaking news, eye-opening interviews, and incisive critical takes that drive the conversation forward.

Share

Article topics