How Would Andy Warhol Have Decorated Christmas Cookies?

These highbrow confections are almost good enough to hang on your wall.

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These Mark Rothko cookies are from Pixel Whisk.
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These Mark Rothko cookies are from Pixel Whisk.
These Mark Rothko cookies are from Pixel Whisk.
The mini-easels really sell these colorful Jackson Pollock splatter cookies from Jacks and Kate.
The mini-easels really sell these colorful Jackson Pollock splatter cookies from Jacks and Kate.
Wedding favor cookies inspired by Vincent van Gogh's Starry Night by the Land of Milk 'N' Cookies.
Wedding favor cookies inspired by Vincent van Gogh's Starry Night by the Land of Milk 'N' Cookies.
Piet Mondrian-inspired cookies in Christmas colors, by Fitzsu.
Piet Mondrian-inspired cookies in Christmas colors, by Fitzsu.
Henri Matisse cookies from Fresh Baked Fun.
Henri Matisse cookies from Fresh Baked Fun.
The Andy Warhol soup can in cookie form from Fresh Baked Fun.
The Andy Warhol soup can in cookie form from Fresh Baked Fun.
Pablo Picasso's Blue Nude as a cookie by Fresh Baked Fun.
Pablo Picasso's Blue Nude as a cookie by Fresh Baked Fun.
Keith Haring cookies from Fresh Baked Fun.
Keith Haring cookies from Fresh Baked Fun.

How would Piet Mondrian or Vincent van Gogh decorate a plate of cookies to leave out for jolly old St. Nick? We’ve already explored how art history’s most famous painters might approach Thanksgiving dinner (see “This is How Your Favorite Artists Would Plate Their Thanksgiving Meals“). Now, consider the cookie as art, a tasty canvas to be transformed into the next great masterpiece.

Luckily, Google did not let us down in our search for cheerfully decorated Christmas cookies with an artful spin. It turns that talented bakers have been aping famous artists for any number of occasions, from Jackson Pollock-themed parties to weddings and art gallery openings, or even just for an excuse to show off their confectionery prowess on Reddit.

So, this holiday, feast your eyes as well as your stomach with paint-splatter cookies à la Jackson Pollock, soup-can-painted edibles inspired by Andy Warhol‘s beloved subject, and coin-shaped delicacies featuring Keith Haring‘s iconic “Radiant Baby.” Many of these sweet offerings come with tutorials should you wish to bake your own. Unfortunately, the closest we got for Jeff Koons was that giant painting of a slice of cake from the Whitney retrospective, and someone who built Balloon Dog (Yellow) out of Twinkies. But, then again, would you really want to eat anything featuring images from Koons’s graphic “Made in Heaven” series? Sounds like a recipe for indigestion.


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