Looking for a Truly Beautiful Face Mask? Well, Museums Around the World Are Selling Art-Inspired Ones… and Some Aren’t TOO Weird

Tired of the same old surgical face masks? Try a stylish, safe, and artful mask from these museum gift shops around the world.

Tom of Finland Face Masks are all the rage, you guys.
Tom of Finland Face Masks are all the rage, you guys.

In 2020, the must-have accessory is, without question, the face mask.

Even a quick trip to the store is impossible without a handy face covering (and maybe a plastic face shield, Purell to-go bottle, and disposable gloves).

But what to do when you’re sick of the same-old tired surgical look?

Luckily, museum gift shops (and they are struggling right now) are getting in on the action, with some flashy, fantastic face masks. Even institutions that are still closed to visitors are selling them!

Below, we’ve rounded up some of the best.

 

Diego Rivera Face Masks
Detroit Institute of Art

 

Courtesy of the Detroit Institute of Art.

Courtesy of the Detroit Institute of Art.

 

Colorful Face Masks
Guggenheim Bilbao

Courtesy of the Guggenheim Bilbao.

 

Van Gogh’s Sunflowers Face Masks
National Gallery of Art, London

Courtesy of the National Gallery, London.

 

“Floral Impressions” Face Masks
Metropolitan Museum of Art

Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

 

Tom of Finland Face Masks
Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles

Tom of Finland Face Mask, courtesy of MOCA, Los Angeles.

 

Rembrandt Self-Portrait Face Masks
Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

Courtesy of the Rijksmuseum.

 

Klimt-Inspired Face Masks
Klimt Villa

Courtesy of Klimt Villa.

 

“Fine-Art” Face Masks
Barnes Museum

Courtesy of the Barnes Foundation.

 

Carlos Amorales-Inspired Face Masks
Stedelijk Museum

Photo: Iris Duvekot.

 

Starry Night Face Masks
National Gallery of Art, Washington DC

Courtesy of the National Gallery of Art.


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