From Ancient Egyptian Sculpture to Old Masters Drawings, Your Go-To Guide to New York’s Winter Antiques Week

The first fair week of the year is here.

Gorham, Vase or Bonbon Dish, almost certainly made for and exhibited at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago. Photo courtesy of Spencer Marks.
Gorham, Vase or Bonbon Dish, almost certainly made for and exhibited at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago. Photo courtesy of Spencer Marks.

The first major New York art event of the year, the Winter Antiques Fair, touches down this week, along with the Outsider Art Fair and the New York Ceramic and Glass Fair, and Master Drawings New York is not far behind. Here’s artnet News’s go-to guide to the week’s fairs and on-theme exhibitions on view throughout the city.

Paul Evans, Large Argente Cabinet. Photo courtesy of Lobel Modern.

Paul Evans’s Large Argente Cabinet. Photo courtesy of Lobel Modern.

1. Winter Antiques Show
There’s something for everyone at the the Winter Antiques Show, now in its 64th edition, from ancient Egyptian sculpture to American Folk Art, with art, antiques, and design objects spanning thousands of years from the 70 exhibitors.

Location: Park Avenue Armory, 643 Park Avenue
Price: $25
Date and Time: January 18–28; opening Thursday, 5 p.m.–9 p.m.; open daily, 12 p.m.–8 p.m.

Kabinda Kunkulu Victor (Belgian Congo, b. 1927) The Bird and the Snake</em>. Courtesy of Indigo Arts.

Kabinda Kunkulu Victor’s The Bird and the Snake. Image courtesy of Indigo Arts.

2. Outsider Art Fair
Self-taught artists take center-stage at the Outsider Art Fair, which features 63 international galleries. To mark the one-year anniversary of the Women’s March, the fair is hosting a special open-call booth title “Onward,” in which artists were invited to create works envisioning the future of women. Among the exhibitors, many are bringing the work of African-American female artists from the South, such as Minnie Evans, Sister Gertrude Morgan, Mary Whitfield, and Ida Jones.

Location: Metropolitan Pavilion, 125 West 18th Street
Price: $20
Date and Time: January 18–21; Thursday, 2 p.m.–9 p.m.; Friday–Saturday, 11 a.m.–8 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

Decorative items from a remarkable assemblage of 18th-century slipware ceramics uncovered during an archaeological excavation in Philadelphia. Photo courtesy of Robert Hunter.

Decorative items from a remarkable assemblage of 18th-century slipware ceramics uncovered during an archaeological excavation in Philadelphia. Photo courtesy of Robert Hunter.

3. New York Ceramics and Glass Fair
The US’s only fair specializing in ceramics, pottery, and glass, the Ceramics and Glass Fair features 28 galleries. Don’t miss a special exhibition of newly discovered 18th-century slipware (not for sale) among 85,000 objects excavated from the site of the new Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia.

Location: Bohemian National Hall, 321 East 73rd Street
Price: $20
Date and Time: January 17–21; Wednesday, 5 p.m.–8:30 p.m.; Thursday–Saturday, 11 a.m.–7 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m.–4 p.m.

Lucian Freud, <em>Boat, Connemara</em>. Courtesy Stephen Ongpin Fine Art.

Lucian Freud’s Boat, Connemara. Image courtesy of Stephen Ongpin Fine Art.

4. Master Drawings New York
From the Old Masters to contemporary works, 21 international galleries bring their best drawings, watercolors, and oil sketches to the 12th year of Master Drawings. Orazio Gentileschi, Edgar Degas, Lucian Freud, and Cy Twombly are among the wide range of artists you can expect to encounter.

Location: 21 locations on the Upper East Side
Price: Free
Date and Time: January 27–February 3; Preview Friday, January 27, 4 p.m.–8 p.m.; Sunday, January 22, 2 p.m.–6 p.m.; open daily, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

Du Paquier Porcelain Manufactory, Elephant Wine Dispenser, (c. 1740). Photo courtesy of the Frick Collection/Michael Bodycomb.

Du Paquier Porcelain Manufactory’s Elephant Wine Dispenser (c. 1740). Photo courtesy of the Frick Collection/Michael Bodycomb.

5. “Fired by Passion: Masterpieces of Du Paquier Porcelain from the Sullivan Collection” at the Frick Collection
After receiving a gift of 14 pieces of Du Paquier porcelain from Paul Sullivan and trustee Melinda Martin Sullivan in 2016, the Frick has mounted a show dedicated to the Viennese company featuring some 40 tureens, drinking vessels, platters, and other objects. Founded in 1718 and active only 25 years, Du Paquier was nonetheless only the second European outfit to produce true porcelain and played an important part in the rise of the continent’s porcelain production.

Location: The Frick Collection, 1 East 70th Street
Price: $22
Date and Time: Through August 12; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

Honma Hideaki, <em>Flowing Pattern</em> (2014). Photo courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Honma Hideaki’s Flowing Pattern (2014). Photo courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

6. “Japanese Bamboo Art: The Abbey Collection” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art
Tracing the history of Japanese basketry from the late 19th century to the present day, this exhibition includes over 70 promised gifts from Diane and Arthur Abbey, whose collection of Japanese baskets and bamboo art is among the world’s best. Among the featured artists are six masters officially designated as a “Living National Treasure.”

Location: Met Fifth Avenue, 1000 Fifth Avenue
Price: Suggested admission $25
Date and Time: Through February 4; Sunday–Thursday, 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m.; Friday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–9 p.m.

Tea Kettle And Stand (USA), 1888 manufactured by Dominick and Haff, New York. Photo courtesy of the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum.

Tea Kettle And Stand (USA), 1888 manufactured by Dominick and Haff, New York. Photo courtesy of the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum.

7. “Passion for the Exotic: Japonism” at the Cooper Hewitt at Smithsonian Design Museum
This exhibition documents the influence of “exotic” Japanese aesthetics on Western art and design after 1854, when American commodore Matthew C. Perry established the first trade treaty with the formerly closed society. Examples of almost 50 pieces from the museum’s collection of the European and American Aesthetic Movement, including works in ivory, lacquerwork, ceramic, and textile, are on view in the Carnegie Mansion’s Teak Room, designed by Lockwood de Forest.

Location: Cooper Hewitt, 2 East 92nd Street
Price: $16 online/$18 at the door
Date and Time: Through June 18; Sunday–Friday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.–9 p.m.

Multiple examples of the Dragonfly shade in the Gallery of Tiffany Lamps at the New-York Historical Society.
 Courtesy of the New-York Historical Society/Corrado Serra.

Multiple examples of the Dragonfly shade in the Gallery of Tiffany Lamps at the New-York Historical Society.
 Photo courtesy of the New-York Historical Society/Corrado Serra.

8. “Gallery of Tiffany Lamps” at the New-York Historical Society
If you haven’t visited the New-York Historical Society since they unveiled their renovated fourth-floor galleries last year, take the time to seek out the museum’s collection of over 100 Louis Comfort Tiffany lamps. The exhibition offers a history of these gorgeous glass creations, many of which were designed by Clara Driscoll and the Women’s Glass Cutting Department.`

Location: New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West at Richard Gilder Way (West 77th Street)
Price: $21
Date and Time: Ongoing; Tuesday–Thursday, Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; Friday, 10 a.m.–8 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m.–5 p.m.


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