NYC Graffiti Artist Dies Electrocuted by Subway’s Third Rail

Jason Wulf, known by his graffiti tag of DG, died after being electrocuted by the subway's third rail. Photo: via Animal New York.
Jason Wulf, known by his graffiti tag of DG, died after being electrocuted by the subway's third rail. Photo: via Animal New York.

Veteran graffiti artist Jason Wulf, who has been tagging New City subways and buildings since 1985, died last week in a Brooklyn subway tunnel after being electrocuted by the third rail, reports Gothamist.

Described by the New York Post as a “underground graffiti legend,” Wulf, the founder of the “New Wave Crew,” was known by his “DG” tag. At 10 p.m. on Wednesday, July 2, Wulf’s body was found by police on the tracks of the 25th Street station in Sunset Park.

The artist was alone, and may have been tagging the station. By Friday, extra police were stationed at the 25th Street stop to discourage the numerous graffiti artists who had turned up to pay tribute to Wulf by spray-painting the late artist’s tag at the site.

A subway car tagged by Jason Wulf, known by his graffiti tag of DG. The artist died after being electrocuted by the subway's third rail. Photo: via Animal New York.

A subway car tagged by Jason Wulf, known by his graffiti tag of DG. The artist died after being electrocuted by the subway’s third rail.
Photo: via Animal New York.

Wulf was no stranger to police attention, having been arrested 13 times in the last six years alone. Most recently, back in February, he was charged with criminal mischief, graffiti, and trespassing.

The local graffiti community has been incredibly vocal in the aftermath of Wulf’s death. On Animal New York, Bucky Turco praised him as part of “that older-school breed of graffiti writer who had no interest in mainstream recognition,” while describing his work as “canvasses on par with those found in the world’s most prestigious art institutions.”  

Friends of the artist have already raised $10,000 in an online campaign to cover his funeral costs. The services were held Monday at Seneca Chapels and St. Matthias Church in Ridgewood, Queens. The casket, which was white, served as a canvas for those wishing to send Wulf off with one last graffiti tribute.


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