Spotlight: How Hungarian-Born Artist Rose Feller Takes an Experimental Approach Across Mediums, From Oil Paint to Artificial Intelligence

The primarily self-taught artist is also the founder of Gloucestershire's Agartha Art Gallery.

Rose Feller, artist and founder of Agartha Gallery.

Every month, hundreds of galleries add newly available works by thousands of artists to the Artnet Gallery Network—and every week, we shine a spotlight on one artist you should know. Check out what we have in store, and inquire for more with one simple click.  

About the Artist: The Hungarian-born artist Rose Feller (also known as Rozsa Szucs) works across a variety of media, from oil paints to recycled and organic materials. Feller moved to the U.K. in 2008, only studying art formally in the last several years, when she earned a degree from the University of Gloucester in fine art. Over the years, the largely self-taught artist has transitioned from figurative painting in oil to surrealistic and abstract art—even recently experimenting with A.I. art, with many of her works focusing on the female experience. The artist is also the founder of Gloucestershire’s Agartha Art Gallery, where she showcases her own work as well as other contemporary artists. 

Why We Like It: Feller engages with materials that push the boundaries of what is typically considered fine art, including a range of organic materials like egg shells. In 2019, she began experimenting with A.I. technologies, creating works she felt were representative of her dreams. Her series “The Archaeology of the Moon” includes mixed-media works that explore concepts of illusion and delusion in romantic relationships.  

According to the Experts: In Feller’s work, cathartic expulsion becomes a form of female ritual, more aligned to recent practices of Arte Povera than those related to misogynistic rhetoric of earlier practices such as Abstract Expressionism. In her work, the role of sexuality is very important, as it brings back the role of the woman partly removed by an essentialist view of the mother still very deeply rooted in the family. Sexuality in Feller’s work is a right of freedom, not politicized or even political, but an ancestral right, a premise that begins in the desire toward life, and, yes, it leads to motherhood, but beyond that, it is a feature of woman’s intimate expression toward an archaeology of a language before language,” wrote art critic Denise Carvalho in the essay “The Archaeology of the Moon: New Works.”

See available works by Rose Feller below.

 

Rose Feller
Love 1 (2020)
Agartha Art Gallery
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Rose Feller, Love 1 (2020). Courtesy of Agartha Art Gallery.

Rose Feller, Love 1 (2020). Courtesy of Agartha Art Gallery.

 

Rose Feller
The Unkempt (2019)
Agartha Art Gallery
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Rose Feller, The Unkempt (2019). Courtesy of Agartha Art Gallery.

Rose Feller, The Unkempt (2019). Courtesy of Agartha Art Gallery.

 

Rose Feller
The Spirit of a Soldier (2019)
Agartha Art Gallery
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Rose Feller, The Spirit of a Soldier (2019). Courtesy of Agartha Art Gallery.

Rose Feller, The Spirit of a Soldier (2019). Courtesy of Agartha Art Gallery.


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