7 Artworks From Artnet’s Gallery Network That Our Experts Are Loving This Week

Each week, our gallery liaisons share their favorite works from the Artnet Gallery Network.

Barbara Astman,Red Series: Ping Pong Macquette (1981). Courtesy of Elan Fine Art.
Barbara Astman,Red Series: Ping Pong Macquette (1981). Courtesy of Elan Fine Art.

Every week, we explore the thousands of galleries on the Artnet Gallery Network to highlight the spaces and artworks inspiring us right now. Take a look at our latest picks below.

 

Boris Nzebo
Speed Demon 2 (2019)
Gloria Gallery
Inquire for More Information

Boris Nzebo, Speed Demon 2 (2019). Courtesy of Gloria Gallery

Boris Nzebo, Speed Demon 2 (2019). Courtesy of Gloria Gallery

The multiple layers of this aluminum sculpture by Cameroonian artist Boris Nzebo create an impression of the psychology of urban experience. Its neon tones create a greater sense of depth, drawing attention to the detailed patterning of the many cut-out forms that form this mindscape. This piece balances attention-grabbing freshness with a nuanced reflection of the human experience.

—Carson Wos

 

Nan Goldin
The Crowd, Paternò (2004)
Marian Goodman Gallery
Inquire for More Information

Nan Goldin, The Crowd, Paternò (2004). Courtesy of Marian Goodman Gallery

Nan Goldin, The Crowd, Paternò (2004). Courtesy of Marian Goodman Gallery

Nan Goldin’s The Crowd, Paternò captures the dense human flux and warmth of a seemingly distant pre-covid memory. The blurred figures form a wave in motion, bringing me into their space, feeling the vibrancy and movement of this moment.

—Gillian Ochoa

 

JuanCarlos rLora
Autumn Ghost Town
ArtToSaveLives
Inquire for More Information

JuanCarlos rLora, Autumn Ghost Town. Courtesy of ArtToSaveLives.

JuanCarlos rLora, Autumn Ghost Town. Courtesy of ArtToSaveLives.

JuanCarlos is a conceptual abstract artist who frequently touches on the subject of pollution and the preservation of our planet, visually inspiring viewers through the canvas. On one hand, Autumn Ghost Town represents the artist’s memories walking through down Central Park West in New York, while the abstractions in the sky warn of things to come if we don’t change the way we are treating the earth. The work is Flor’s “Abstract Photo Reality” series which imaginatively combines realism with abstraction. 

—Julia Yook

 

Barbara Astman
Domestic Warrior No. 4 (2015)
Elan Fine Art
Inquire for More Information

Barbara Astman, Domestic Warrior No. 4 (2015). Courtesy of Elan Fine Art.

Barbara Astman, Domestic Warrior No. 4 (2015). Courtesy of Elan Fine Art.

Canadian artist Barbara Astman has received international recognition over the last four decades for her photo-based works. Her works are included in many important collections. Retiring this year as one of Ontario College of Art and Design University’s leading professors, Astman started her own journey there studying sculpture. She often appears in her own works over the years, and much of her recent practice focuses on traces of self-representation, portraying herself through the socio-political progressive lens of femininity. “The Domestic Warrior” series takes a unique look at a daily domestic activity. These organic-looking forms are actually made from lint from the dryer and in her process alters what is normally considered domestic drudgery – the laundry – into a domestic glory. Once Astman began the process of creating the pieces, the work then evolved into a exploration of her family. The success of this series lies in the open interpretation and exploration of the audience’s knowledge and perspective, which often draws delightful conclusions.

—Julia Yook

 

Hiroshi Furuyoshi
Maya (2020)
Rehs Galleries, Inc.
Inquire for More Information

Hiroshi Furuyoshi, Maya (2020). Courtesy of Rehs Galleries, Inc.

Hiroshi Furuyoshi, Maya (2020). Courtesy of Rehs Galleries, Inc.

Hiroshi Furuyoshi’s ultra-realistic paintings are inspired by the great masters as well as his childhood spent in his parents’ antiques shop. Unsurprisingly his paintings often lush backgrounds so realistic that you almost want to reach out for the objects inside.

—Karin Petit

 

Yulia Iosilzon
When Day Passes and Moon Appears (2021)
Carvalho Park
Inquire for More Information

Yulia Iosilzon, When Day Passes and Moon Appears (2021). Courtesy of Carvalho Park.

Yulia Iosilzon, When Day Passes and Moon Appears (2021). Courtesy of Carvalho Park.

Iosilzon’s latest body of work tells a new story in an airy and whimsical setting. This is an appropriate chapter following her 2019 exhibition which was grounded on an earthly paradise. When Day Passes and Moon Appears, can be considered a titular vignette of the artist’s lore. The clouds, translucent fabrics, and iconic figures are all present, further grounding the escapism and serenity apparent in the collection of paintings that even expands into sculptural elements of glazed earthenware.

—Santiago Garcia Cano

 

René Roeser
Surreal Still Life (2018)
Art-Management
Inquire for More Information

René Roeser, Surreal Still Life (2018) Art-Management

René Roeser, Surreal Still Life (2018) Art-Management

Luxembourg-based artist René Roeser follows in the footsteps of the Surrealists by taking everyday objects and scenes and making them strange and unsettling, but his modern photographic techniques mean his work fits perfectly in the 21st Century.

—Sara Carson


Follow Artnet News on Facebook:


Want to stay ahead of the art world? Subscribe to our newsletter to get the breaking news, eye-opening interviews, and incisive critical takes that drive the conversation forward.

Share