5 New Artistic Talents From the Artnet Gallery Network We’re Watching This October

This month, we're watching emerging artists with works on view from Los Angeles to Linz.

Kristian Touborg, Turning Fluent (Refracted View) T(2021). Courtesy of Carvalho Park.
Kristian Touborg, Turning Fluent (Refracted View) T(2021). Courtesy of Carvalho Park.

At the Artnet Gallery Network, our goal is to discover new artists each and every month. We sift through the thousands of talented artists on our site to select a few we find particularly intriguing right now.

This month, we’ve chosen five artists whose work we think you should know about, available at spaces from Brooklyn to Berlin. Check them out below.

 

Andreas Stylianou
Galstian Advisory LLC, Los Angeles 

Andreas Stylianou, DAY/ NIGHT (2020). Courtesy of Galstian Advisory LLC.

Andreas Stylianou, DAY/ NIGHT (2020). Courtesy of Galstian Advisory LLC.

Cyprus-born artist Andreas Stylianou studied architecture in London before deciding to pursue art. His colorful, often intricate paintings and drawings pull from familiar pop culture references and the artist’s own life. While seemingly unconstrained, they are the products of a diligent and layered process.

 

Andrea Luth
Forum Presents, Linz 

Andrea Luth, Untitled (2020). Courtesy of forum presents.

Andrea Luth, Untitled (2020). Courtesy of forum presents.

Andrea Luth’s paintings have a childlike quality, akin to cartoons and doodles found in a school notebook, but are matched with an irreverent sense of wit. In this exhibition, the artist debuts new paintings that draw a range of references into her unique visual language. In one work, theater curtains open onto a blue sky, bringing to mind René Magritte; other times, her applications of paint bring to mind the works of Laura Owens. It’s a refreshingly playful group of works that are worth a closer look. 

 

Kristian Touborg
Carvalho Park, Brooklyn 

Kristian Touborg, Dawn+Sequence. Courtesy of Carvalho Park.

Kristian Touborg, Dawn+Sequence. Courtesy of Carvalho Park.

Copenhagen-based artist Kristian Touborg’s work is on view for the first time in the U.S. in “As We Turn Fluent,” a two-person show in Brooklyn featuring fellow Danish artist Tove Storch and curated by Henriette Noermark. The exhibition explores ideas of fluency in architectural terms—balancing of forces and effects. Here, Touborg’s textile works poetically present spaces of suspended movement and tension; collaged from fragments of recycled fabrics, reflective industrial textiles, and swatches of digitally printed canvas hand-sewn together, the artist’s expressive textiles sometimes feature details from previous works, snippets of art-historical imagery, or architectural photographs taken by the artist while walking around his neighborhood. They are richly layered and draw the eye to them again and again. 

 

Ruscha Voormann
Galerie Crone, Berlin 

Ruscha Voormann, Ousia VII (2021). Courtesy of Galerie Crone.

Ruscha Voormann, Ousia VII (2021). Courtesy of Galerie Crone.

In Munich-based artist Ruscha Voormann’s first solo exhibition, “Swipe Up” at Galerie Crone, Berlin, the emerging artist debuts recent large-format, abstract compositions made of acrylic and plexiglas. In these dynamic pictures, the artist pulls acrylic paint between a plexiglas plate (often in the shape of round disc) and the surface of the canvas. The plates, though rotated in controlled targeting movements, are an experiment in the tensions between control and loss of control. The artist considers her works a visual metaphor for coping with life and balancing between what we can control and surrendering to the unconscious. 

 

JuanCarlos rLora
ArtToSaveLives Contemporary, Fort Lauderdale

JuanCarlos rLora, Hidden (2018). Courtesy of ArttoSaveLives.

JuanCarlos rLora, Hidden (2018). Courtesy of ArttoSaveLives.

Currently, ArtToSaveLives Contemporary in Fort Lauderdale, Floriday, is presenting a solo exhibition of JuanCarlos rLora’s vibrant “Flor del Sol” paintings. The abstract series centers on the concept of a “Flower of Love” that is capable of existing on the sun. The artist views the series as a response to the climate crisis; in the narrative rLora has created around it, the flower asks its creator to be born in the flames of the sun in the hopes of imploring humanity to change our ways before the environment on Earth is irredeemably lost.


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