From Bruegel in Vienna to Basquiat in Paris, Here Are 38 Must-See Museum Shows Worth Traveling for This Fall

Globetrotting art lovers have a lot to look forward to in the coming season.

Pieter Bruegel the Elder, The Tower of Babel (1563). Courtesy of Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna, Picture Gallery ©KHM-Museumsverband.
Pieter Bruegel the Elder, The Tower of Babel (1563). Courtesy of Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna, Picture Gallery ©KHM-Museumsverband.

The fall museum season is in full swing with an impressive roster of museum shows opening around the globe. From the first-ever major exhibition dedicated to Pieter Bruegel the Elder to a show surveying all the ways artists have been inspired by the moon, here are 37 shows worth traveling for in the months to come.

 

1. “Tadashi Kawamata: Para-site Project” at the Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow
August 25–October 28, 2018

Installation view of “Tadashi Kawamata: Para-site Project" at the Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow. Photo courtesy of the Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow.

Installation view of “Tadashi Kawamata: Para-site Project” at the Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts. Courtesy of the Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow. 

For Tadashi Kawamata’s first site-specific installation in Russia, the Japanese artist repurposes materials from old demolished buildings in Moscow’s museum quarter. The exhibition will extend beyond the institution’s galleries and courtyard, overtaking the director’s office with the artist’s nest-like structures.

Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts, Volkhonka 12, Moscow. General admission is $9 for the whole museum, $6 for just the main building. 

 

2. “Wu Guanzhong: Expressions of Pen & Palette” at the National Gallery Singapore
August 31, 2018–September 29, 2019

Wu Guanzhong, Running Stream (1988). Courtesy of the National Gallery Singapore.

Chinese painter Wu Guanzhong would have turned 100 next year. To commemorate his centenary, the National Gallery of Singapore presents a selection of his innovative work, which blends traditional Chinese ink painting with Western modernism.

National Gallery of Singapore, 1 St. Andrew’s Road, Singapore. General admission is $14.50 for foreigners, free for Singaporeans. 

 

3. “MMCA Hyundai Motor Series 2018: CHOIJEONGHWA – Blooming Matrix” at the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Seoul
September 5, 2018–February 10, 2019

Installation view of "MMCA Hyundai Motor Series 2018: CHOIJEONGHWA – Blooming Matrix" with CHOIJEONGHWA, <em>Blooming Matrix</em> (2016–18). Photo courtesy of MMCA Seoul.

Installation view of “MMCA Hyundai Motor Series 2018: CHOIJEONGHWA – Blooming Matrix” with CHOIJEONGHWA, Blooming Matrix (2016-18). Courtesy of MMCA Seoul.

South Korean artist CHOIJEONGHWA represents his country’s enormous economic growth in recent decades with large-scale sculptural installations made up of everyday materials that are considered cheap and disposable. By transforming ordinary plastic items, such as baskets, brooms, and piggybanks, into objects of high culture, he blurs the lines between art and everyday life.

MMCA Seoul, 30 Samcheong-ro, Sogyeok-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul, South Korea. General admission is $3.50. 

 

4. “Flip Sides” Statens Museum for Kunst, Copenhagen
September 8, 2018–March 10, 2019

The reverse of Richard Mortensen, <em>Woman and Birds</em> (1937). Photo courtesy of the Statens Museums for Kunst.

The reverse of Richard Mortensen, Woman and Birds (1937). Courtesy of the Statens Museums for Kunst.

Denmark’s National Gallery shines a spotlight on the backside of canvases for a special exhibition for Copenhagen’s annual Golden Days Festival. The show is inspired by this year’s festival theme, “B-Sides of History,” and features flipped-over paintings from the museum’s collection to reveal what lies beneath—sometimes an unfinished work, or evidence of its former owners, or earlier restorations.

Statens Museums for Kunst, Sølvgade 48-50, Copenhagen. General admission is $17. 

 

5. “Mika Rottenberg” at Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art, London
September 8–November 4, 2018

Mika Rottenberg, <em>Cosmic Generator</em> (2017), film still. Courtesy of the artist and Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art.

Mika Rottenberg, Cosmic Generator (2017), film still. Courtesy of the artist and Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art.

Argentina’s Mika Rottenberg is known for her visually captivating, absurdly fantastical films that explore themes of labor and globalization through the seemingly endless repetition of ridiculous tasks. She has built two installations for the inaugural exhibition at the new Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art, which has also commissioned two films for the occasion.

Goldsmiths CCA, St. James’ New Cross, London, UK. Admission is free. 

 

6. “Cao Fei: A Hollow in a World Too Full” at Tai Kwun Contemporary, Hong Kong
September 8–December 12, 2018

Cao Fei, <em>Prison Architect</em> (still). Photo courtesy of Tai Kwun.

Cao Fei, Prison Architect (still). Courtesy of Tai Kwun.

Beijing’s Ullens Center for Contemporary Art is hosting Cao Fei’s first Chinese museum show at the new Tai Kwun Contemporary in Hong Kong, formerly a police compound. The centerpiece of the exhibition is the artist’s latest film, Prison Architect, which was commissioned with the site in mind. The piece explores the location at two different periods in time, following a dissident poet imprisoned at the complex when it was Victoria Prison in 1968 and an architect hired to transform an art gallery into a prison—the reverse of the site’s real-life history.

Tai Kwun Contemporary, 10 Hollywood Road, Central, Hong Kong. Admission is free.

 

7. “René Daniëls: Fragments from an Unfinished Novel” at WIELS Contemporary Art Centre, Brussels
September 9, 2018–January 6, 2019

René Daniëls, Untitled (1987). Courtesy of the Dordrechts Museum, gift from Bedrijfsvrienden Dordrechts Museum, 2015.

René Daniëls, Untitled (1987). Courtesy of the Dordrechts Museum, gift from Bedrijfsvrienden Dordrechts Museum, 2015.

Dutch painter René Daniëls was a rising star in the 1970s and ’80s, until he suffered an aneurysm at just 37 years old, in 1987, that left him unable to work. Some of the works included in the upcoming exhibition has never been exhibited before.

WIELS Contemporary Art Centre, Avenue Van Volxemlaan 354, Brussels. General admission is $11.50. 

 

8. “The Moon: From Inner Worlds to Outer Space” at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark
September 13, 2018–January 20, 2019

Fritz Lang, <em>Frau im Mond</em> (1929). Photo courtesy of Horst von Harbou/Deutsche Kinemathek.

Fritz Lang, Frau im Mond (1929). Courtesy of Horst von Harbou/Deutsche Kinemathek.

Japanese billionaire art collector Yusaku Maezawa is planning to take artists to the moon in the hopes that it will inspire their work. If the Louisiana’s latest exhibition is any indication, he’s right. The museum has brought together 200 works that reflect the moon’s outsize import in art history, from a moon map by Galileo to designed for 3-D printed moon bases by Norman Foster.

Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Gl Strandvej 13, Humlebæk, Denmark. General admission is $19.50.

 

9. “Paul Mpagi Sepuya: Double Enclosure” at FOAM, Amsterdam
September 14–November 18, 2018

Paul Mpagi Sepuya, Mirror Study (2016). ©Paul Mpagi Sepuya.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya is a master of framing, obscuring parts of his subjects with mirrors, draped fabrics, and by layering strips cut from previous images. These strange compositions, which rarely reveal the entirety of those who pose for him, defy easy comprehension, forcing viewers to take a closer look to really understand how Sepuya’s images are constructed.

FOAM, Keizersgracht 609, 1017 DS Amsterdam. General admission is $13.  

 

10. “Warhol 1968” at the Moderna Museet
September 15, 2018–February 17, 2019

Andy Warhol. Photo by Lasse Olsson/Pressens bild, courtesy of the Moderna Museet.

Andy Warhol. Photo by Lasse Olsson/Pressens bild, courtesy of the Moderna Museet.

It would have been Andy Warhol‘s 90th birthday this year, but the Moderna Museet is commemorating a more Sweden-specific event: the 50th anniversary of the Pop artist’s first European solo museum show, held at the Stockholm institution. Revisiting the exhibition and examining its political and social context, the new show also includes seminal Warhol works such as his Brillo Boxes (1964) and Mao (1973).

The Moderna Museet, Exercisplan 4, 111 49 Stockholm, Sweden. General admission is $11. 

11. “Liang Shaoji” at M WOODS, Beijing
September 15–November 11, 2018

Liang Shaoji, <em>The Temple</em> (2013–18), installation view. Photo courtesy of M WOODS.

Liang Shaoji, The Temple (2013-18), installation view. Photo courtesy of M WOODS.

For his first solo show in Beijing in nearly a decade, Liang Shaoji presents four new pieces as well as work that dates back to the 1990s. The show of sculpture, installation, film, and photography will take over almost the entirety of M WOODS. Working in Tiantai, a remote city in the mountains four hours outside of Shanghai, the artist taps into nature by working with silkworms to create delicate, illuminated silk works that evoke both science and spirituality, tapping into our connection to the earth.

M WOODS, D-06, 798 Art Zone, No. 2 Jiuxianqiao Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing, China. General admission is $11.50.

 

12. “All Things Being Equal…” at the Zeitz Museum of Contemporary African Art, Cape Town
September 22–December 30, 2018

Athi-Patra Ruga, <em>The Night of the Long Knives I</em> (2013). Photo courtesy of Zeitz MOCAA.

Athi-Patra Ruga, The Night of the Long Knives I (2013). Photo courtesy of Zeitz MOCAA.

South Africa’s new Zeitz MOCAA, the largest museum in Africa, dedicated entirely to African art, presents its first exhibition, which hopes to answer a question that may be on visitors’ minds: “How will I be represented in the museum?” Among its 40 artists are El Anatsui, William Kentridge, Chris Ofili, Hank Willis Thomas, Liza Lou, Athi-Patro Ruga, and Zanele Muholi.

Zeitz MOCAA Silo District, S Arm Road, V&A Waterfont, Cape Town, South Africa. General admission is $13. 

 

13. “Restless Times: Archaeology in Germany” at Martin Gropius Bau, Staatliche Museen du Berlin
September 21, 2018–January 6, 2019

Oldest European representation of the night sky, found in 1999 by illegal amateur treasure hunters at Mittelberg, Sachsen-Anhalt. Photo by Juraj Lipták, ©Landesamt für Denkmalpflege und Archäologie Sachsen-Anhalt.

The oldest European representation of the night sky, found in 1999 by illegal amateur treasure hunters at Mittelberg, Sachsen-Anhalt. Photo by Juraj Lipták, ©Landesamt für Denkmalpflege und Archäologie Sachsen-Anhalt.

As part of the European Year of Cultural Heritage 2018, Germany is showcasing its most impressive archaeological finds of the last 20 years, including the port wall of Roman-era Cologne, its almost 2,000-year-old oak planks well-preserved in the banks of the Rhine River, and “degenerate” art hidden from the Nazis in a Berlin apartment destroyed during World War II.

Martin Gropius Bau, Niederkirchnerstr 7, 10963 Berlin. General admission is $14.

 

14. “Women Artists: Florence, 1900–1950” at the Spazio Mostre Fondazione Firenze, Florence
September 22–November 18, 2018

A work by Leonetta Pieraccini. Courtesy of Advancing Women Artists.

A work by Leonetta Pieraccini. Courtesy of Advancing Women Artists.

Advancing Women Artists continues its efforts to champion “invisible” women artists with this exhibition highlighting the under-appreciated painting and sculpture of Florence’s female artists in the first half of the 20th century. The works of Leonetta Cecchi Pieraccini and Fillide Levasti Giorgi are complemented by those of their female contemporaries Elisabeth Chaplin, Marisa Mori, Elena Salvaneschi, Adriana Pincherle, Flavia Arlotta, Vittoria Morelli, and Evelyn Scarampi, all artists who tirelessly pursued their passion for painting despite widespread discrimination against women.

The Spazio Mostre Fondazione CR Firenze, Via Bufalini 6, Florence, Italy. Admission is free. 

 

15. “Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run” at the Yuz Museum, Shanghai
September 22–December 9, 2018

Tschabalala Self, <em>Blunt</em> (2018). Courtesy of the artist and Pilar Corrias, London.

Tschabalala Self, Blunt (2018). Courtesy of the artist and Pilar Corrias, London.

Tschabalala Self, a native of Harlem’s Hamilton Heights neighborhood, brings her bodega-themed paintings to Shanghai for her first solo show in China. The series is inspired by the New York corner stores she grew up around, which are largely stocked with processed and canned foods—and therefore reflective of economic disparities along class and racial lines in the US.

The Yuz Museum, West Bund Shanghai, 35 Fenggu Road, Xuhui District, Shanghai, China. General admission is $14.50.

 

16. “Calder: The Mobile World of a Radical Inventor” at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts
September 22, 2018–February 17, 2019

Alexander Calder works from the exhibition of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. Photo courtesy of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts.

Alexander Calder works from the exhibition at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. Courtesy of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts.

Canada’s first major Alexander Calder retrospective features 150 works by the great multidisciplinary artist, including paintings, wire sculptures, and his groundbreaking mobiles, plus archival documents.

The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, 1380, Sherbrooke Street O, Montreal, Canada. General admission is $18.

 

17. “Anthropocene” at the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, and the Canadian Photography Institute at the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa
September 28, 2018–January 6, 2019 and February 24, 2019

Edward Burtynsky, <em>Lithium Mines #1, Salt Flats, Atacama Desert, Chile</em> (2017). Photo courtesy of the artist and Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Toronto. ©Edward Burtynsky, 2017.

Edward Burtynsky, Lithium Mines #1, Salt Flats, Atacama Desert, Chile (2017). Photo courtesy of the artist and Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Toronto. ©Edward Burtynsky, 2017.

Photographer Edward Burtynsky has teamed up with filmmakers Jennifer Baichwal and Nicholas de Pencier to document the human impact on our planet, as we plunge ever deeper into the Anthopocene, a geological epoch defined by the effects of human activity. Their multidisciplinary Anthropocene project includes photographs, film installations, large-scale murals, and augmented reality that reveal the realities of climate change.

The Art Gallery of Ontario, 317 Dundas Street West, Toronto, Ontario. General admission is $15, special exhibitions $19.

The Canadian Photography Institute at the National Gallery of Canada, 380 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Canada. General admission is $11.50. 

 

18. “Marcel Broodthaers” at Garage Museum, Moscow
September 29, 2018–February 3, 2019

Marcel Broodthaers, <em>Cinéma Modèle</em> (1970). Photo ©estate of the artist.

Marcel Broodthaers, Cinéma Modèle (1970). Photo © the estate of the artist.

Belgian artist, poet, and filmmaker Marcel Broodthaers gets his first solo show in Russia 42 years after his death. In honor of Garage’s 10th anniversary, the museum has brought together 80 works, from early films to late “décor” installations of palm trees.

The Garage Museum, 9/32 Krymsky Val st., 119049, Moscow, Russia. General admission is $7.50. 

 

19. “Magdalena Abakanowicz: Presence, Essence, Identity” at the Stara Kopalnia Centrum Nauki Sztuki, Wałbrzych, Poland
September 30–December 30, 2018

Installation view of "Magdalena Abakanowicz: Presence, Essence, Identity" at the Stara Kopalnia, Wałbrzych, Poland. Photo by Linda Parys.

Installation view of “Magdalena Abakanowicz: Presence, Essence, Identity” at the Stara Kopalnia, Wałbrzych, Poland. Photo by Linda Parys.

Polish artist Magdalena Abakanowicz became known for her unique woven fiber sculptures, dubbed “Abakans,” in the 1960s. This exhibition of more than 100 works demonstrates how the artist defied categorization, continually reinventing herself in her explorations of identity, loss, and other complex themes.

The Stara Kopalnia (the Old Mine Center for Science and Art) is at Park Wielokulturowy Stara Kopalnia ul. Piotra Wysockiego, Wałbrzych, Poland. General admission is $7. 

 

20. “Wan Chai Grammatica: Past, Present, Future Tense” at the Hong Kong Arts Centre
September 30–November 4, 2018

Luis Chan, <em>Untitled (Fantasy Landscape with Undersea Mountains)</em>, 1977. Courtesy of Hanart TZ Gallery.

Luis Chan, Untitled (Fantasy Landscape with Undersea Mountains), 1977. Courtesy of Hanart TZ Gallery.

The Hong Kong Arts Centre celebrates its 40th birthday with a group show showcasing the role that the Wan Chai neighborhood, which it calls home, has played in shaping the city’s cultural and artistic identity, as well as Hong Kong’s increasing prominence on the international art scene. To tell this story, curator Valerie C. Doran has selected 19 artists who hail from Hong Kong or have strong ties to the city.

The Hong Kong Arts Centre, Pao Galleries, 4-5/F, 2 Harbour Road, Wan Chai, Hong Kong. Admission is free.

 

21. “MACRO Asilo: The Museum Opens Up to the City” at the Museo d’Arte Contemporanea Roma
October 1, 2018–December 31, 2019

"Macro Asilo." Photo courtesy of MACRO.

“Macro Asilo.” Photo courtesy of MACRO.

Curator Giorgio de Finis has completely revamped Rome’s Museo d’Arte Contemporanea Roma with an experimental art project called MACRO ASILO. Some 250 artists will take part, interacting directly with visitors as part of an effort to better engage the public in a city known more for its antiquities and Renaissance masterpieces than its contemporary art. Michelangelo Pistoletto and Wim Wenders are among those slated to take part.

MACRO, via Nizza 138, Salario-Nomentano, Rome. Admission is free. 

 

22. “Bruegel” at the Kunsthistoriches Museum Wien, Vienna
October 2, 2018–January 13, 2019

Pieter Bruegel the Elder, <em>Dulle Griet</em> (circa 1562). The work has been restored on the occasion of the exhibition. ©Museum Mayer van den Bergh, Antwerp, Belgium.

Pieter Bruegel the Elder, Dulle Griet (circa 1562). The work has been restored on the occasion of the exhibition. ©Museum Mayer van den Bergh, Antwerp, Belgium.

Timed to the 450th anniversary of the death of Pieter Bruegel the Elder next year, the Kunst Historiches is hosting the world’s first ever major monograph exhibition of the artist. It features more than 75 percent of the artist’s known paintings—an especially impressive feat considering that many of the fragile works rarely travel. Two canvases, Dulle Griet (circa 1562) from Antwerp’s Museum Mayer van den Bergh and The Triumph of Death (1562–63) from the Museo Nacional del Prado in Madrid, have been restored for the show, which has been in the works for six years.

The Kunsthistoriches Museum Wien, Maria-Theresien-Platz, 1010 Wien, Vienna. General admission is $17.50.

 

23. “Dorothea Tanning: Behind the Door, Another Invisible Door” at the Museo Reina Sofia, Madrid
October 3, 2018–January 7, 2019

Dorothea Tanning,Birthday (1942). Courtesy of the Philadelphia Museum of Art.Dorothea Tanning,Birthday (1942). Courtesy of the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Dorothea Tanning, Birthday (1942). Courtesy of the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

The full career arc of Surrealist Dorothea Tanner takes shape at the Mueso Reina Sofia, which had to rely entirely on loans to put together this 150-piece exhibition, which spans six decades—the museum doesn’t have any works by Tanner in its permanent collection.

The Museo Reina Sofia, Edifico Sabatini, Santa Isabel, 52, Madrid, Spain, General admission is $11.50.

 

24. “Jean-Michel Basquiat” at the Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris
October 3, 2018–January 4, 2019

Jean-Michel Basquiat, Grillo</em> (1984).Collection of the Fondation Louis Vuitton ©Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Licensed by Artestar, New York. Photo ©Fondation Louis Vuitton/Marc Domage.

Jean-Michel Basquiat, Grillo (1984). Collection of the Fondation Louis Vuitton ©Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Licensed by Artestar, New York. Photo ©Fondation Louis Vuitton/Marc Domage.

Catch 120 works spanning the entirety of Jean-Michel Basquiat‘s short career, from 1980 to 1988, at Paris’s Fondation Louis Vuitton, which has also brought together the artist’s “Heads” (1981-82) series for the first time. Much of the work, which includes several collaborations with Pop art great Andy Warhol, has never been shown in Europe before.

Fondation Louis Vuitton, 8, Avenue du Mahatma Gandhi Bois de Boulogne, Paris. General admission is $18.50. 

 

25. “Leonardo da Vinci” at the Teylers Museum, Haarlem, the Netherlands
October 5, 2018–January 6, 2019

Leonardo da Vinci, <em>Head of a Man, Full Face, and the Head of a Lion</em> (circa 1508). Courtesy of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II/Royal Collection Trust, via the Teylers Museum, Haarlem, the Netherlands.

Leonardo da Vinci, Head of a Man, Full Face, and the Head of a Lion (circa 1508). Courtesy of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II/Royal Collection Trust, via the Teylers Museum, Haarlem, the Netherlands.

The Netherlands gets its first major exhibition of drawings by Renaissance great Leonardo da Vinci, kicking off 2019 celebrations of the 500th anniversary of the artist’s death. The show focuses on his expressive faces, with sketches that depict a wide range of human emotion—as seen in his dramatic, famed version of The Last Supper—and oftentimes capture grotesque features, unlike the typically angelic figures seen in his paintings.

The Teylers Museum, Spaarne 16, 2011 CH Haarlem, the Netherlands. General admission is $25.

 

26. “Gauguin and Laval in Martinique” at the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam
October 5, 2018–January 13, 2019

Paul Gauguin, <em>Martinique Landscape</em> (1887). Courtesy of the Scottish National Gallery, Edinburgh.

Paul Gauguin, Martinique Landscape (1887). Courtesy of the Scottish National Gallery, Edinburgh.

Paul Gauguin‘s travels to the tropics are well known, but the Van Gogh Museum has staged the first exhibition that combines art from his 1887 trip to Martinique with that of Gauguin’s traveling companion, his friend and fellow artist Charles Laval. The show includes a sketch from the collection of the Tate in London, newly authenticated as a Gauguin portrait, likely depicting Laval.

The Van Gogh Museum, Museumplein 6, Amsterdam. General admission is $21. 

 

27. “Anni Albers” at the Tate Modern, London
October 11, 2018–January 27, 2019

Anni Albers, <em>Intersecting</em> (1962). Photo by Werner J. Hannappel, courtesy of the Josef Albers Museum Quadrat Bottrop; ©the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, 2018.

Anni Albers, Intersecting (1962). Photo by Werner J. Hannappel, courtesy of the Josef Albers Museum Quadrat Bottrop; ©the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, 2018.

Anni Albers, a student of Germany’s Bauhaus, which celebrates its 100th anniversary in 2019, was married to Josef Albers. Now she gets her first UK retrospective for her own textile-based work, from small-scale pictorial weavings to large wall hangings, plus prints and drawings, showcasing her considerable influence on Modern art and design.

Tate Modern, Bankside, London. General admission is free. 

 

28. “The Artist Is Present” at the Yuz Museum, Shanghai
October 11–December 16, 2018

Superflex, <em>Power Toilets, UN</em>. A copy of the toilets from the United Nations Security Council headquarters. Photo courtesy of the artist.

Superflex, Power Toilets, UN. A copy of the toilets from the United Nations Security Council headquarters. Photo courtesy of the artist.

Gucci creative director Alessandro Michele and artist Maurizio Cattelan have teamed up to curate a group show that tackles the difficult question of originality in art, attempting to determine where inspiration ends and plagiarism begins. (The exhibition name is taken, of course, from Marina Abramoviç’s blockbuster 2010 show at New York’s Museum of Modern Art.) Works on view include Wim Delvoye’s highly active digestive track sculpture Cloaca No. 5, Mika Rottenberg’s video NoNoseKnows, and Superflex’s Power Toilets, a perfect replica of the United Nations Security Council’s bathroom.

The Yuz Museum, West Bund Shanghai, 35 Fenggu Road, Xuhui District, Shanghai, China. General admission is $14.50.

 

29. “Cubism” at the Centre Pompidou, Paris
October 17, 2018–February 25, 2019

Georges Braque, <em>Le Viaduc à L'Estaque, (The Viaduct at L'Estaque)</em>, 1908. Photo courtesy of the Centre Pompidou, ©Adagp, Paris.

Georges Braque, Le Viaduc à L’Estaque, (The Viaduct at L’Estaque) (1908). Courtesy of the Centre Pompidou, ©Adagp, Paris.

This major Cubism retrospective is the first to be held in France since 1953. A comprehensive approach with some 300 works, the show revisits the development of the movement under Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso as well its influence on later artists such as Juan Gris, Fernand Léger, and Ambroise Vollard.

The Centre Pompiou, Place Georges-Pompidou, Paris, France. General admission is $16.

 

30. “Tomás Saraceno: On Air” at the Palais de Tokyo, Paris 
October 17, 2018–January 6, 2019

Tomás Saraceno. Photo courtesy of the artist and the Palais de Tokyo.

Tomás Saraceno. Photo courtesy of the artist and the Palais de Tokyo.

For its fourth annual “Cartes Blanche” exhibition, the Palais de Tokyo has given Tomás Saraceno free reign over the entire museum. For the show, the Argentinean artist has teamed up with architects, astrophysicists, and spiders to transform the institution.

The Palais de Tokyo, 13 Avenue du Président Wilson, Paris, France. General admission is $14.

 

31. “Picasso: The Sculpture” at Galleria Borghese, Rome
October 24, 2018–February 3, 2019

Pablo Picasso, Tete da taureau (1950). Photo courtesy of the Galleria Borghese.

Pablo Picasso, Tete da taureau (1950). Courtesy of the Galleria Borghese.

Pablo Picasso gets a show along the Borghese’s famed Bernini marbles, which he saw in person during a 1917 trip to Rome that proved influential on his artistic practice. Picasso’s first dedicated sculpture show in Rome features 56 sculptures created between 1905 and 1964. Anna Coliva, who was suspended as the museum’s director this spring, is curating the show with the artist’s granddaughter Diana Widmaier-Picasso.

The Galleria Borghese, Piazzale Scipione, Borghese, 5, Rome, Italy. General admission is $17. 

32. “My 2,000-Year-Old Double” at the Musée de la Civilisation, Quebec
October 24, 2018–May 12, 2019

Is this an art doppleganger match? Photo courtesy of the Musée de la Civilisation.

Is this an art doppleganger match? Photo courtesy of the Musée de la Civilisation.

Québec photographer François Brunelle has utilized facial recognition software to identify people who look like works from the Greco-Roman and Egyptian collections of Geneva’s Musée d’art et d’histoire and Fondation Gandur pour l’Art. Members of the public were invited to submit their photos, which were reviewed algorithmically; the exhibition features Brunelle’s black-and-white portraits of the best matches, but you still can look at the featured statues and judge for yourself if any of them could be your long-lost twin.

The Musée de la Civilisation, 85 Rue Dalhousie
 Québec City, Canada. General admission is $13.

 

33. “Lily van der Stokker: Friendly Good” at the Stedelijk, Amsterdam
October 27, 2018–February 24, 2019

Lily van der Stokker, <em>Transfer that money to me</eM> (2010), at Art Features. Photo courtesy of the Stedelijk Museum.

Lily van der Stokker, Transfer that money to me (2010), at Art Features. Courtesy of the Stedelijk Museum.

Dutch feminist artist Lily van der Stokker is unapologetic in her use of girly pastels, flowers, and other decorative motifs normally considered verboten in the contemporary art world. “I am a beauty specialist,” the artist has said, embracing friendliness to “take a stand against irony and cynicism.”

The Stedelijk, Museumplein 10, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. General admission is $20.

 

34. “Spitzmaus Mummy in a Coffin and Other Treasures: Wes Anderson and Juman Malouf” at the Kunsthistoriches Museum Wien, Vienna
November 6, 2018–April 28, 2019

Wes Anderson and Juman Malouf. Courtesy of Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna.

Filmmaker Wes Anderson and his partner, costume designer and novelist Juman Malouf, have been given free reign to curate an exhibition from the 4 million-object collection of Vienna’s Kunst Historiches Museum. It’s their first time curating—the third in a series of guest-curated exhibitions—and they’ve pulled from every department at the museum, from musical instruments and carriages to Egyptian antiquities and Old Master paintings.

The Kunsthistoriches Museum Wien is located at Maria-Theresien-Platz, 1010 Wien, Vienna. General admission is $17.50.

 

35. “Martine Franck” at the Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson, Paris
November 6, 2018–February 10, 2019

Martine Franck, Beach, village of Puri, Inde (1980). © Martine Franck / Magnum Photos.

The Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson will reopen at a new location in the heart of Paris this fall, inaugurating the new space with an exhibition dedicated to photographer Martine Franck, who was married to Henri Cartier-Bresson. Franck shot for magazines such as VogueLIFE, and Sports Illustrated, and established the Vu and Viva agencies in Europe, as well as working with the Théâtre du Soleil troupe.

The Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson, 79 rue des Archives, Paris, France. 

 

36. “Entangle: Physics and the Artistic Imagination” at Bildmuseet, Umeå, Sweden
November 16, 2018–April 14, 2019

Julian Charrière, <em>Redwing II – First Light</em> (2016). Photo courtesy of the Bildmuseet.

Julian Charrière, Redwing II – First Light (2016). Photo courtesy of the Bildmuseet.

This group show of painting, installation, fashion, architecture, sculpture, film, digital art, and photography is inspired by various scientific phenomena, from black holes, to gravity, to dark matter and beyond. Artists include William Kentridge, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, Goshka Macuga, and Sarah Sze.

The Bildmuseet, Umeå Arts Campus, Östra strandgatan 30B, 903 33 Umeå, Sweden. Admission is free.

 

37. “Arahmaiani: The Past has not Passed (Masa Lalu Belumlah Berlalu)” at the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Nusantara, Jakarta
November 17, 2018–March 10, 2019

Arahmaiani, <em>Handle Without Care</em> (1996/1997), performance at the 2nd Asia Pacific Triennial, Queensland Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia, in 1996. Photo courtesy of Museum MACAN.

Arahmaiani, Handle Without Care (1996/1997), performance at the second Asia Pacific Triennial, Queensland Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia, in 1996. Photo courtesy of Museum MACAN.

Jakarta’s new Museum MACAN shines the spotlight on Indonesian artist Arahmaiani, who incorporates Javanese culture and symbolism into her social activism-infused practice, which touches on consumerism, cultural diversity, and women’s issues. The museum presents more than 70 works, including paintings, installations, and performance reenactments dating from the 1980s to the present.

The Museum MACAN, AKR Tower Level MM, Jalan Panjang No. 5 Kebon Jeruk, Jakarta Barat 11530, Indonesia. General admission is $6.50.

 

38. “Qiu Zhijie: Mappa Mundi” at the Ullens Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing
November 24, 2018–March 3, 2019

Qiu Zhijie, <em>Mappa Mundi</em>. Courtesy of the Ullens Center for Contemporary Art

Qiu Zhijie, Mappa Mundi. Courtesy of the Ullens Center for Contemporary Art

For almost a decade now, Qiu Zhijie’s ambitious “Mapping the World” project has created unique cartographical landscapes, mapping ideas, individuals, and situations, rather than discrete places. The artist began by attempting to characterize relationships between his own works from his exhibition catalogues, and has since since expanded his purview even further. His monumental guide to the artists, works, and history covered in “Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World” at New York’s Guggenheim Museum was on view as part of that show.

The Ullens Center for Contemporary Art, No. 4, 798 Art Zone, No. 4 Jiuxianqiao Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing. General admission is $8.50.


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