Ingrid Schaffner To Curate Next Carnegie International

Ingrid Schaffner; Photo: Constance Mensh, courtesy of Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania
Ingrid Schaffner. Photo: Constance Mensh, courtesy of Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania.

Ingrid Schaffner will curate the 57th Carnegie International at Pittsburgh’s Carnegie Museum of Art, taking place in fall 2018. Schaffner has been chief curator at the Institute of Contemporary Art at the University of Pennsylvania since 2010, and takes up her new role May 1.

A Pittsburgh native, Schaffner has been the organizer of solo exhibitions of the work of Karen Kilimnik, Jason Rhoades, and Anne Tyng, among others, and thematic group shows such as “The Photogenic,” “The Puppet Show,” “Queer Voice,” and “Dirt on Delight: Impulses that Form Clay.” Schaffner has authored more than a score of books and almost 200 articles and reviews.

After studying in the Whitney Museum of American Art Independent Study Program in New York, she earned a master’s degree in art history at New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts. She has organized shows for venues including the Drawing Center and the Swiss Institute (New York), London’s Hayward Gallery, and Haus der Kunst (Munich), among others.

Taking place every three to five years, the Carnegie International is second only to the Venice Biennale for the oldest recurring art exhibition in the world (see World’s Top 20 Biennials, Triennials, and Miscellennials). The museum buys numerous works from each edition of the exhibition, which thus has a prominent role in shaping the institution’s collection.

The 2013 edition resulted in acquisitions of works by Phyllida Barlow, Wade Guyton, and Zanele Muholi, among many others, and was curated by Daniel Baumann, Dan Byers, and Tina Kukielski (see 25 Women Curators Shaking Things Up). Previous editions have brought artists from John Singer Sargent and James Abbott McNeill Whistler to Chris Ofili, Nam June Paik, and Kara Walker into the collection. Two artists win prizes at each edition: the Carnegie Prize for outstanding achievement in the exhibition in the context of a lifetime of work, and the Fine Prize for an emerging artist in the exhibition.

The museum was founded in 1895 by industrialist Andrew Carnegie and spans American and European painting, sculpture, and decorative arts from the 19th century to the present.

Earlier this month, the Carnegie hired Daniel M. Leers as curator of photography (see Carnegie Museum of Art Names Daniel M. Leers Curator of Photography).


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