11 International Exhibitions to See Outside of Europe and the US in (Early) 2018

Museum shows from Israel to New Zealand.

Zoya Cherkassky, New Victims (2016). Courtesy of Zoya CherkasskyRosenfeld Gallery.

Now that 2018 is underway, artnet News has rounded up some of the best art to look forward to this calendar year, from international biennials to exhibitions in the US and in Europe. To complement those lists, we’ve sought out 11 additional travel-worthy museum shows from around the globe.

Zoya Cherkassky, <em>Rabbi's Deliquium</em> (2016). Courtesy of the Israel Museum.

Zoya Cherkassky’s Rabbi’s Deliquium (2016). Image courtesy of the Israel Museum.

Zoya Cherkassky: Pravda” at the Israel Museum, Jerusalem, January 10–

Zoya Cherkassky gets her first museum solo show, featuring approximately 50 paintings and 50 works on paper. Drawing on her personal experiences, she illustrates the cultural struggles of the one million immigrants who left Russia for Israel in the early 1990s.

Francis Alys, <em>Tornado Milpa Alta</em> (2000–10), video still. Courtesy David Zwirner New York.

Francis Alys, Tornado Milpa Alta (2000–10), video still. Photo courtesy David Zwirner New York.

Francis Alÿs: Knot’n Dust” at the Beirut Art Center, January 11–March 5

In 2015, Francis Alÿs photographed the aftermath of a Beirut sandstorm, creating images that became the jumping-off point for this exhibition documenting turbulence on both minute and monumental scales.

Magasin III Jaffa. Photo courtesy of Magasin III Jaffa.

Magasin III Jaffa. Photo courtesy of Magasin III Jaffa.

Haim Steinbach: Zerubbabel” at Magasin III Jaffa, Tel Aviv, Israel, January 20–

Currently closed for a two-year hiatus, Stockholm’s Magasin III Museum & Foundation for Contemporary Art will debut its Tel Aviv satellite space with a Haim Steinbach show curated by David Neuman. It’s the artist’s first solo exhibition in Israel.

Joan Mitchell’s Piano mécanique (1958). © Estate of Joan Mitchell. Photo: National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC.

Mitchell/Riopelle: Nothing in Moderation” at the Art Gallery of Ontario, February 18, 2018–

An intimate look at the personal and professional relationship between American artist Joan Mitchell and Canadian Jean-Paul Riopelle—a powerhouse couple who each interpreted Abstract Expressionism in a distinctive manner—this exhibition, which debuted at the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, is a worthy alternative to the inevitably long lines of AGO’s leg of Yayoi Kusama’s blockbuster North American tour.

Thomas Hirschhorn, <i>Flamme éternelle</i> (2014). Image courtesy of the artist and Palais de Tokyo, Paris.

Thomas Hirschhorn’s Flamme éternelle (2014). Photo courtesy of the artist and Palais de Tokyo, Paris.

Thomas Hirschhorn: What I Can Learn From You. What You Can Learn From Me. (Critical Workshop)” at the Remai Modern Museum, January 27–February 25

Thomas Hirschhorn’s affirmation of the importance of sharing is the driving force behind this philosophical show at Canada’s newest modern art museum.

Gilles Caron, <em>Catcher demonstrators, Battle of the Bogside, Derry, Northern Ireland, August 1969</em>. Courtesy of the Fondation Gilles/Fondation Gilles Caron.

Gilles Caron’s Catcher demonstrators, Battle of the Bogside, Derry, Northern Ireland, August 1969. Courtesy of the Fondation Gilles/Fondation Gilles Caron.

Uprisings” at the Museo Universitario Arte Contemporáneo in Mexico City, February 24–July 29

French art historian Georges Didi Huberman has curated this exhibition featuring paintings, drawings, prints, photographs, films, and even written manuscripts documenting social unrest, political agitation, revolution, and insurrection.

Left, Ala Younis's <i>Plan for Greater Baghdad</i> (2015). Installation view at the 56th Venice Biennale. Photo by Alessandra Chemollo. Courtesy la Biennale di Venezia. Right, Ala Younis. Photo Isabella Balena.

Left, Ala Younis’s Plan for Greater Baghdad (2015). Installation view at the 56th Venice Biennale. Photo by Alessandra Chemollo. Courtesy la Biennale di Venezia. Right, Ala Younis. Photo Isabella Balena.

“Ala Younis: Plan for Feminist Greater Baghdad” at the Project Space Art Jameel in Dubai, March 1–April 14

In collaboration with the London-based Delfina Foundation, Art Jameel’s Dubai outpost presents an installation by artist Ala Younis, expanding on her 2015 work created for the Venice Biennale. The original piece explores the contribution of male architects to the infrastructure of Baghdad, while the 2018 addition focuses on works by female artists and architects who have contributed to the development of the capital city’s cultural landscape. Included are the contributions of artist Nuha al-Radi, who documented the lives of everyday people during the turbulence of the early 1990s; Fahrelnissa Zeid, a Turkish-born abstract painter; and Zaha Hadid, the late starchitect whose imaginative drawings continue to influence generations of designers.

Peter Robinson, <em>Shindig</em> (2017). Photograph courtesy the artist and Hopkinson Mossman, by Alex North.

Peter Robinson’s Shindig (2017). Photograph courtesy the artist and Hopkinson Mossman, by Alex North.

Peter Robinson” at the Centre of Contemporary Art, Christchurch, New Zealand, March 3–May 15

Auckland-based artist Peter Robinson, of Kāi Tahu (a Maori tribe) descent, will take over CoCA with a large-scale sculptural installation made from everyday materials such as wood, wire, paper, metal, nails, and magnets.

Ivory elephant forn from Sicily, Italy (c. 12th century, with c. 17th century silver mount made in England). Photograph courtesy of Sean Weaver Photography.

Ivory elephant horn from Sicily, Italy (c. 12th century, with c. 17th-century silver mount made in England). Photo courtesy of Sean Weaver Photography.

The World of the Fatimids” at the Aga Khan Museum in Toronto, March 10–July 2

The Aga Khan Museum pays tribute to one of the world’s great unsung civilizations, the Fatimid dynasty, a caliphate that ruled North Africa and the Middle East in the 10th and 11th centuries. Reaching new heights in the arts and sciences, such as perfecting the craft of ceramic lusterware, the Fatimids were hugely influential in the Mediterranean region. Highlights of the exhibition include monumental marble reliefs from the Museum of Islamic Art in Cairo that are leaving Egypt for the first time, as well as rock crystal and ivory luxury objects.

Self-portrait of Latif Al-Ani (left) and filmmaker Latif Saleh at the Abedeen Palace, Cairo, Egypt, 1964. Photo courtesy of Arab Image Foundation.

Self-portrait of Latif Al-Ani (left) and filmmaker Latif Saleh at the Abedeen Palace, Cairo, Egypt, 1964. Photo courtesy of Arab Image Foundation.

Latif Al Ani” at the Sharjah Art Foundation, UAE, March 16–June 16

The exhibition traces the career of the Iraqi-born photographer Latif Al Ani, who founded the photography department at the Iraqi Ministry of Culture and documented the daily lives of Iraqis for more than three decades.

Taniho Reina's <em>Ubusuna (Birthplace)</em> (2017). Courtesy of the Yokohama Museum of Art.

Taniho Reina’s Ubusuna (Birthplace) (2017). Courtesy of the Yokohama Museum of Art.

Taniho Reina: Resonance” at the Yokohama Museum of Art, Japan, March 17–April 22

Emerging Japanese artist Taniho Reina gets a solo show for her lush, vibrant paintings. Rich with detail, her canvases explore the origins of life.


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