A New Exhibition Called ‘Art in the Age of Anxiety’ Captures How Freaked-Out We All Were Even Before Coronavirus. See Images Here

While museums are closed to the public, we are spotlighting an inspiring exhibition somewhere around the globe each day.

Trevor Paglen, CLOUD #135 Hough Lines, (2019). Courtesy of the artist and PACE Gallery.
Trevor Paglen, CLOUD #135 Hough Lines, (2019). Courtesy of the artist and PACE Gallery.

While museums around the globe are closed to the public, we are spotlighting each day an inspiring exhibition that was previously on view. Even if you can’t see it in person, allow us to give you a virtual look. 

Art in the Age of Anxiety
Sharjah Art Foundation

 

What the museum says: “‘Art in the Age of Anxiety’ conjures the bombardment of information, misinformation, emotion, deception, and secrecy that invades online and offline life in the age of digital technology. It aims to illuminate the ‘post-digital’ condition—the manners and behaviors found in a world altered by the rise of digital technologies—and posits speculations for our future.

The exhibition design for ‘Art in the Age of Anxiety’ is created by architect—and Sharjah Biennial 13 participant—Todd Reisz. Reisz’s work often focuses on cities of the Arabian Peninsula from both historical and contemporary perspectives. Here, he has worked with curator Omar Kholeif to imagine a physical maze of corridors and experiences that will fully immerse the viewer.”

Why it’s worth a look: In his debut exhibition as senior curator of the Sharjah Foundation, Omar Kholeif has corralled some of the most prescient works of the internet-era. It’s a subject that Kholeif knows well having organized numerous related exhibitions, including “I Was Raised on the Internet” at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, which broached themes of artificial intelligence, isolation, disassociation, transmission, interconnectedness, and more.

In the new show, more than 60 works spanning every medium imaginable represent every corner of the Internet, from Trevor Paglen’s surveillance-based aerial photographs, to Cao Fei’s surreal landscapes drawn from video game culture.

What it looks like:

Eva and Franco Mattes, Catt (2010) in “Art in the Age of Anxiety” at the Sharjah Foundation. Photo: Danko Stjepanovic.

Installation view, “Art in the Age of Anxiety,” 2020. at the Sharjah Art Foundation. Photo: Danko Stjepanovic.

Cory Arcangel, Yoga/Lakes (2017). © Cory Arcangel.

Installation view, "Art in the Age of Anxiety," 2020. at the Sharjah Art Foundation. Photo: Danko Stjepanovic.

Installation view, “Art in the Age of Anxiety,” 2020. at the Sharjah Art Foundation. Photo: Danko Stjepanovic.

Guan Xiao, Documentary of Agriculture: Breeding, (2019). Photo: Mareike Tocha. Courtesy: Guan Xiao, Products Farming, installation view, 2019, Bonner Kunstverein. Courtesy of the artist, Antenna Space, Shanghai, and Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler, Berlin.

Bogosi Sekhukhuni, Totem for Soul Contract Revocations, Dream Diary Season 2: Joyce, (2017). Courtesy of Stevenson Gallery.

Installation view, "Art in the Age of Anxiety," 2020. at the Sharjah Art Foundation. Photo: Danko Stjepanovic.

Installation view, “Art in the Age of Anxiety,” 2020. at the Sharjah Art Foundation. Photo: Danko Stjepanovic.

Douglas Coupland, Father Figure, (2016). Courtesy of the artist and Daniel Faria Gallery.

Trevor Paglen, Circles (video still) (2015). Courtesy of the artist, Metro Pictures New York, and Altman Siegel San Francisco.

Constant Dullaart, Mirror PVA Formation, Shadow Cube Division (2019). Photo: Gert Jan van Rooij, courtesy of Upstream Gallery Amsterdam.

Thomson & Craighead, More Songs Of Innocence And Of Experience (2013). Courtesy of the artists.

Jeremy Bailey, The Future of Television (2012).

YOUNG HAE CHEANG HEAVY INDUSTRIES, SAMSUNG (2018).

Katja Novitskova, Pattern of Activation (Mutants) (2018) in “Art in the Age of Anxiety” at the Sharjah Foundation.


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