Editors’ Picks: 6 Art Events to See in New York This Week

Check out the East Village's latest pop-up.

Manuel Alfredo Cossa, Balancing act (2013), Mozambique. Courtesy of Imago Mundi.
Manuel Alfredo Cossa, Balancing act (2013), Mozambique. Courtesy of Imago Mundi.

Through Sunday, June 12:

Robert Cipriano, Brush (2016). Courtesy of the artist.

Robert Cipriano, Brush (2016). Courtesy of the artist.

Group Exhibition, “Window Shopping
Artists Kate Moger, Mateo Nava, Cyrus Blaze, and Sedrick Chisom have curated an exciting lineup of young talent in a temporary pop-up show playfully titled “Window Shopping.” The group exhibition, which opened over the weekend, offers fresh perspectives on narcissism, globalization, and isolation that take form in 2-D, 3-D, and video-based works.

In a poetic gesture, “Window Shopping” re-purposes what used to be St. Mark’s Bookshop, an East Village mainstay that shuttered this year after nearly four decades of operation.

Location: 31 3rd Avenue
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 12:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

—Rain Embuscado

Saturday, May 21–Sunday, July 17:

Jameco Exchange. Courtesy of No Longer Empty.

Jameco Exchange. Courtesy of No Longer Empty.

No Longer Empty, “Jameco Exchange
No Longer Empty, a nonprofit arts organization, has organized an extensive exhibition of works about and around the historic community of Jamaica, Queens. The show, which occupies a two-story storefront, boasts a lineup of site-responsive projects by artists like Ibrahim Ahmed, who stunned at Volta earlier this year with his emotional mixed-media sculptures, and Mary Valverde, who was recently named to the New York City Public Design Commission

Location: 89-62B 165th Street, Jamaica
Price: Free
Time: Thursday–Sunday, 12:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m., closed May 29

—Rain Embuscado

Sunday, May 22–Monday, August 29:

Papo Colo, Superman 51 (1977). Courtesy of the artist.

Papo Colo, Superman 51 (1977). Courtesy of the artist.

Papo Colo at MoMA PS1 
Jeanette Ingberman and Papo Colo founded Exit Art in 1982, at 578 Broadway, in Soho. Their first show, “Illegal America,” presented a group of artists who weren’t afraid to take risks, such as nude cellist Charlotte Moorman and AIDS activist-artist David Wojnarowicz. During its 30-year run, Tehching Hsieh, Martin Wong, Ida Applebroog, Vito AcconciGordon Matta-ClarkDavid Hammons, and Carolee Schneemann all passed through Exit Art’s doors. Ingberman died in 2011, and the space shuttered in May 2012.

PS1 is showing a selection of Colo’s early works, including Superman 51 (1977), and Against the Current (1983). In tandem with the show, the artist is performing The Cleaner (2016) on the corner of 23rd Street and 10th Avenue, a few blocks from Exit Art’s final location. From May 21 to July 4, the artist will clean a series of coins on the sidewalk in a white suit and Panama hat in order to address a pertinent issue in the art world today: Tax havens.

Location: MoMA PS1, 22–25 Jackson Ave, Long Island City
Price: $10 general admission
Time: Thursday–Monday, 12:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.

—Kathleen Massara

Monday, May 23:

Manuel Alfredo Cossa, Balancing act (2013), Mozambique. Courtesy of Imago Mundi.

Manuel Alfredo Cossa, Balancing act (2013), Mozambique. Courtesy of Imago Mundi.

Democratic Vistas: Shahzia Sikander and Eleanor Heartney in conversation with Phong Bui
On the occasion of the opening of “Imago Mundi: The Art of Humanity,” Brooklyn Rail editor Phong Bui talks with art critic Eleanor Heartney and Pakistani artist Shahzia Sikander on how globalization is changing the creative process and affecting the art world.

The exhibition (through May 28), drawn from Luciano Benetton’s Imago Mundi collection, features nearly 3,000 artworks from contemporary artists in 14 countries including Afghanistan, Chilie, Syria, and Tibet, each just four-by-five-and-a-half inches.

Location: Talk at Pratt Institute, Higgins Hall Auditorium, 61 St. James Avenue, Brooklyn, exhibition in the Rubelle and Norman Schafler Gallery in the Chemistry Building, 200 Willoughby Avenue, Brooklyn
Price: Free
Time: 6:30 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Tuesday, May 24–Friday, August 12:

Jasper Briggs, Legend in My Living Room: Nora-Ann (2016). Courtesy of Jasper Briggs.

Jasper Briggs, Legend in My Living Room: Nora-Ann (2016). Courtesy of Jasper Briggs.

Legend in My Living Room” at the Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art
Catch Jasper Briggs’s moving portraits of six older members of the LGBTQ community, between 56 and 84, captured in the comfort of their homes. The exhibition, on view in the museum’s Window Gallery,  is co-curated by Steven G. Fullwood, the associate curator of manuscripts, archives, and rare books at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, and Souleo.

“Too often the experiences of Black LGBTQ individuals are erased out of history,” said Fullwood in a statement. “With this project we aim to create greater visibility for this community by empowering them to take control of their narrative and public representation.”

Location: Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art, 26 Wooster Street, between Grand and Canal
Price: Free
Time: opening May 24, 6:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Thursday, May 26:

Philip Guston, Painting, Smoking, Eating (1972). Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Philip Guston, Painting, Smoking, Eating (1972). Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Musa Mayer, Book Signing at Hauser & Wirth
To celebrate its current show (through July 29), “Philip Guston, Painter: 1957–1967,” which examines a pivotal decade in the artist’s career, Hauser & Wirth hosts a reading and book signing by the artist’s daughter, Musa Mayer.

Mayer penned Night Studio: A Memoir of Philip Guston, first published in 1988, which has just been reissued with a new afterword and previously unseen images. The event is free, but reservations are required.

Location: Hauser & Wirth, 511 West 18th Street
Price: Free with reservation
Time: 6:00 p.m.

—Eileen Kinsella


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