15 Artists To Watch at Frieze London 2015

These artists are barometers of exciting things to come.

Ynve Holen at Stuart Shave/ Modern Art.

This year’s edition of Frieze London is filled to bursting with ambitious works of art, eager patrons, and the occasional “artists’ playtime” encounter, such as the one recently seen between Anish Kapoor and Michelangelo Pistoletto. We wandered hallways and entered strange rooms in order to find 15 artists we think are barometers of exciting things to come.

Nicole Wermer at Herald St.

Nicole Wermers at Herald St.

1. Nicole Wermers at Herald St Gallery
The Turner Prize-nominated artist has two pieces on display at Herald St gallery’s booth: a Warholian work on paper and a sculpture depicting the awning of a typical beach house. The German-born, London-based artist confronts consumer culture through her glossy and fashionable works, whether two- or three-dimensional.

Aaron Angell at Rob Tufnell.

Aaron Angell at Rob Tufnell.

2. Aaron Angell at Rob Tufnell
The London-based artist has several miniature environments on view at Rob Tufnell’s stand. Folkloric and subdued in contrast to the noise of his contemporaries, Angell offers us a poetic perspective on the medium that is often seen as feminine, anti-art, and even simplistic.

Magali Reus at Approach Gallery.

Magali Reus at Approach Gallery.

3. Magali Reus at Approach Gallery
The London-based Dutch artist’s fantastic “curb” sculptures, complete with ancillary domestic objects chained and placed atop the work, make a loud appearance at Approach Gallery. The artist recently had a solo show at the SculptureCenter in New York, and we can’t wait to see what she’ll do next.

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Sarah Moulton at Gregor Staiger.

4. Shana Moulton at Galerie Gregor Staiger
The astrologically-inclined artist’s work can be seen at Galerie Gregor Staiger via a massage bed and hospital screen. This gendered installation is done in a psychedelic and kitschy aesthetic, evoking earlier decades, when primping and doctors’ visits were more private affairs. Moulton’s work poses questions about technology, its anxieties, and how we interact with objects that are designed to make us feel like a better version of ourselves.

Anicka Yi at 47 Canal.

Anicka Yi at 47 Canal.

5. Anicka Yi at 47 Canal
New York-based conceptual artist Anicka Yi focuses on scent and perishability as much as aesthetics in her work. Her recent solo exhibition at Kunsthalle Basel was billed as “techno-sensual alchemy” and received much critical acclaim, for good reason: Yi  has guts.

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Camille Henrot at Kamel Mennour.

6. Camille Henrot at Kamel Mennour
French artist Camille Henrot presents waifish figures in pastel hues enacting various private activities which would be humiliating if they were made public. The combination of the lightness of the artist’s  touch and the subversive subject matter produces work that just may endure the next few years in show business.

Ynve Holen at Stuart Shave/ Modern Art.

Ynve Holen at Stuart Shave/ Modern Art.

7. Yngve Holen at Stuart Shave/ Modern Art
The gallery won this year’s Frieze Stand Prize, which should come as no surprise to fairgoers. Yngve Holen’s striking sculpture deconstructs and recombines industrial and domestic materials. The model airplanes, washing machines, thermal imaging and honeycomb cardboard sheets present a jarring landscape that both entices and repels viewers.

Catharine Ahearn at Office Baroque.

Catharine Ahearn at Office Baroque.

8. Catharine Ahearn at Office Baroque
Recent UCLA grad Catherine Ahearn presents a stunning series of sculptures at the booth of Belgian gallery Office Baroque. Collapsing elements of figuration and minimalism, these works posit a challenge to the integrity of both.

Liu Han-Chih at Vitamin Creative Space.

Liu Han-Chih at Vitamin Creative Space.

9. Liu Han-Chih at Vitamin Creative Space
Chinese artist Liu Han Chih’s metal and leather braces manage to be both humorous and incredibly dark. A collar-seizing device mimics the gesture associated with being bullied, but with a mechanical precision.

Haegue Yang at Dependence.

Haegue Yang at Dependence.

10. Haegue Yang at Dépendence
South Korean artist Haegue Yang’s fantastical ball sculptures made from nickel, artifical straws, Indian bells, and Korean bridal crowns adds mystery to the mundane materials.

Vitorrio Broodman at Freedman Fitzpatrick.

Vitorrio Broodman at Freedman Fitzpatrick.

11. Vittorio Brodmann at Freedman Fitzpatrick
Swiss artist Vittorio Brodmann continues his series of playful paintings at the Los Angeles gallery’s booth. His bright colors, contorted figures and modest dimensions evoke elements of classic British caricature underlined with nonsensical humor.

Rachel Rose at Frieze Projects.

Rachel Rose at Frieze Projects.

12. Rachel Rose at Frieze Projects
Rachel Rose’s installation of a mini Frieze tent complete with a sound system blasting ’80s music and stadium quality lights is a fun jab at the fair’s circus-like qualities, as well as the desires of its inhabitants. This may be why Rose was crowned the winner of this year’s Frieze Artists Award.

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Maria Pininska-Beres at Dawid Radziszewski

13. Maria Pininska-Beres at Dawid Radziszewski
Polish artist Pininska-Beres began creating intimate sculptures made out of materials such as papier mâché, cushions, quilted materials, and rocks. The bright pink accents often used in her works give the spaces a feminine edge.

Samara Scott at The Sunday Painter.

14. Samara Scott at The Sunday Painter
It’s no surprise Samara Scott’s commissioned piece for Frieze attracted hordes of fairgoers, and raised eyebrows. The 30-year-old artist created a small puddle of ephemera that made up what she described as the “sewers of a tranny club.” Chalk, oil, eyeshadow, glitter strings, tapioca, yogurt, among many others materials can all be found inside the putrid pond.

Amalia Ulman at Arcadia Missa.

Amalia Ulman at Arcadia Missa.

15. Amalia Ulman at Arcadia Missa
The Argentinian-born artist is known for her social-media based art projects. This time around, she presents a fictionalized “History of the Diary” inside Arcadia Missa’s booth, via a video work that dissects the implications of female sexual repression and exploration.

For more on Frieze Week, see our Insider’s Guide to the Best and Worst of London’s Frieze Week 2015 and be sure to make use of artnet News’ 5 Tips for Every Art Fairgoer. Also, see photos from Ken Kagami’s saucy fair intervention, as well as the top booths at Frieze Masters.


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