8 Artworks From Artnet’s Gallery Network That Our Experts Are Loving This Week

Each week, our gallery liaisons share their favorite works from the Artnet Gallery Network.

Julie Cockburn, The Welder (2019). Courtesy of Flowers Gallery.
Julie Cockburn, The Welder (2019). Courtesy of Flowers Gallery.

Every week, we explore the thousands of galleries on the Artnet Gallery Network to highlight the spaces and artworks inspiring us right now. Take a look at our latest picks below.

 

Karl Heinz Krause
Thoughtful Man
Kunsthandel Hagemeier
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Karl Heinz Krause, Thoughtful Man (1959).  Kunsthandel Hagemeier

Karl Heinz Krause, Thoughtful Man (1959).  Kunsthandel Hagemeier.

After the Second World War, Karl Heinz Krause studied graphics and sculpture in Berlin. He was influenced by his teachers Renée Sintenis and Richard Scheibe, but found is very own way as a sculptor. His main subject is the human body in a range of movements, attitudes and moods. I was immediately fascinated by the sadness and thoughtfulness that this sculpture radiates.

—Alexandra Schott

Evan Whale
Don’t Go Down
321 Gallery via NADA Member Galleries
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Evan Whale, Don't Go Down (2019). Courtesy of 321 Gallery via NADA Member Galleries.

Evan Whale, Don’t Go Down (2019). Courtesy of 321 Gallery via NADA Member Galleries.

This photograph of a sunset by American artist, Evan Whale, is a snapshot of a moment of nostalgic isolation. The gated window is beautifully adorned in colorful swatches of oil pastel, reminding us of the power one’s imagination can serve when spending long periods indoors.

—Cristina Cruz

 

Abdul Qader Al-Rais
Untitled
Leila Heller Gallery
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Abdul Qader Al-Rais, Untitled. Courtesy of Leila Heller Gallery.

Abdul Qader Al-Rais, Untitled. Courtesy of Leila Heller Gallery.

Abdul Qader Al-Rais is known for his abstract paintings combined with geometric shapes and references to his Arabic culture. Earlier in his career, his works often showed local landscapes and figures but over the years geometric shapes have played a more and more important role in his ouevre.

—Karin Petit

 

Julie Cockburn
Dapple (Rainbow Man 1)
Flowers Gallery
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Julie Cockburn, Dapple (Rainbow Man 1). Courtesy of Flowers Gallery.

Julie Cockburn, Dapple (Rainbow Man 1). Courtesy of Flowers Gallery.

Julie Cockburn is a British artist who transforms found photographs through artistic manipulation. I love the placement of the colorful pattern on this black-and-white photograph. By hiding the man’s features underneath, Cockburn makes you question the veracity of how we interpret the things that we see in our everyday life.

—Neha Jambhekar

Ed Ruscha
Blue Suds
Hamilton-Selway Fine Art
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Ed Ruscha, Blue Suds (1971). Courtesy of Hamilton-Selway Fine Art.

Ed Ruscha, Blue Suds (1971). Courtesy of Hamilton-Selway Fine Art.

Along with clouds and ribbons, suds have been another perennial favorite of Ed Ruscha. Here the suds float against a rich, flat periwinkle background that is evocatively disorienting — the suds could be floating against a pristine window looking out on a perfect sky or floating against a meticulously painted and pristine blue car hood. 

—Qadira Farrington

Matthew Lutz-Kinoy
Six bathers with shadows
Mendes Wood DM
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Matthew Lutz-Kinoy, Six bathers with shadows (2019). Courtesy of Mendes Wood DM.

Matthew Lutz-Kinoy, Six Bathers with Shadows (2019). Courtesy of Mendes Wood DM.

Lutz-Kinoy’s large-scale paintings are complete dreams — rendered in the artist’s always smokey pastels. Bathers is a romantic vision of a sensual packed beach — that I, for one, am surely longing for.  

—Santiago Garcia Cano

Tom Hammick
Full Sail (Passacaglia)
Lyndsey Ingram
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Tom Hammick, Full Sail (Passacaglia) (2018). Courtesy of Lyndsey Ingram.

Tom Hammick, Full Sail (Passacaglia) (2018). Courtesy of Lyndsey Ingram.

Tom Hammick’s prints are often of mysterious nautical journeys, many depicted at night. This woodcut print, however, is defined by its glorious shades of blue. The artist is known for his innovative printmaking techniques which allow the natural wood grain to show through in the final piece, as is seen here. 

—Sara Carson

Pichi & Avo
Zeus Lefkos
JG Contemporary
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Pichi & Avo, Zeus Lefkos (2019). Courtesy of JG Contemporary.

Pichi & Avo, Zeus Lefkos (2019). Courtesy of JG Contemporary.

This work playfully takes street art indoors.  The ancient god Zeus meets with urban contemporary mark-making in an energizing collision. Under UV lighting more tags can be seen — many heralding back to the early days of street art. This print would make a lively and fun addition to any home

—Tara Wyant


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