8 Artworks From Artnet’s Gallery Network That Our Experts Are Loving This Week

Each week, our gallery liaisons share their favorite works from the Artnet Gallery Network.

Marie Peter-Toltz, Iseult, 2020. Courtesy of Source Art.
Marie Peter-Toltz, Iseult, 2020. Courtesy of Source Art.

Every week, we explore the thousands of galleries on the Artnet Gallery Network to highlight the spaces and artworks inspiring us right now. Take a look at our latest picks below.

Terry O’Neill
Brigitte Bardot
OSME Fine Art
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Terry O'Neill, Brigitte Bardot (1968). Courtesy of OSME Fine Art

Terry O’Neill, Brigitte Bardot (1968). Courtesy of OSME Fine Art

The British artist Terry O’Neill is well known for his photographs of celebrities of the 1960s and 1970s including Mick Jagger, David Bowie, and Sean Connery. I especially like this portrait of Brigitte Bardot, with her calm, melancholic look into the distance. 

—Alexandra Schott

 

Stephan Marienfeld
Bondage Bronze
Galerie Kellermann
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Stephan Marienfeld, Bondage Bronze (2019). Courtesy of Galerie Kellermann

Stephan Marienfeld, Bondage Bronze (2019). Courtesy of Galerie Kellermann

Through bulges between constraining rope, the works in Marienfeld’s “Bondage” series explore the transformation of hard materials, such as bronze, into soft, pillowy bodies. While seeing my own reflection on the surface, I felt that I shared the same quality of flesh with this piece of bronze. I’m reminded of face Pareidolio (the experience of seeing faces in inanimate objects), as the mere reference of the elasticity of skin has brought me back to my own body.

—Gillian Ochoa

Charlotte Wall
Running Bond, Shaken Not Stirred
Elan Fine Art
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Charlotte Wall, Running Bond, Shaken Not Stirred. Courtesy of Elan Fine Art.

Charlotte Wall, Running Bond, Shaken Not Stirred. Courtesy of Elan Fine Art.

For Canadian artist Charlotte Wall, the word “beauty” is loaded with too much baggage. She said: “I do try to make my pieces appealing, which is a little different from being beautiful, however, the most important aspect of the work is its ability to communicate.” Charlotte Wall’s work seeks to present a subject matter while allowing plenty of space—physically and mentally—for the viewer to arrive at personal interpretations of the work. Running Bond, Shaken Not Stirred mimics the typical ‘running bond’ pattern used in the construction of traditional brick walls. Instead of creating a flat surface, however, the various depths create an undulating surface that pops out at the viewer, creating an illusionary perception of surface and depth.

—Julia Yook

Elinor Carucci
Grandma Puts on the Lipstick, Again
Edwynn Houk Gallery
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Elinor Carucci, Grandma Puts on the Lipstick, Again (2013). Courtesy of Edwynn Houk Gallery.

Elinor Carucci, Grandma Puts on the Lipstick, Again (2013). Courtesy of Edwynn Houk Gallery.

Elinor Carucci’s photographs often offer an intimate and unvarnished view of her and her family’s life. Sometimes, the images are an unapologetic window into real family life. Other times, they appear like frozen images from a staged play. 

—Karin Petit

Oana Cosug
Each With His Own Bubble
Anca Poterasu
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Oana Cosug, Each With His Own Bubble (2020). Courtesy of Anca Poterasu.

Oana Cosug, Each With His Own Bubble (2020). Courtesy of Anca Poterasu.

The delicate watercolor works of Romania-born artist Oana Coşug present only a fragment, a detail, a shadow, a superimposition of a scene.  The forms seem to dissolve and blur into each other, resulting in an exciting reshaping and dialogues of space and body. In the drawing shown here, I particularly like the ambiguity that Oana Coşug plays with, opening up the image. The identity of the figure is unclear and unimportant, it seems to display its inner self-and yet is not exposed entirely to the viewer.

—Miriam Minak

Marie Peter-Toltz
There is a Lover in the Story
Source Art
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Marie Peter-Toltz, Oblivion (2018). Courtesy of Source Art.

Marie Peter-Toltz, There is a Lover in the Story (2018). Courtesy of Source Art.

Looking at this painting is like watching a scene from a fairytale. The white tree, the figure riding the horse, and the rhythms of purples and blue create the aura of a surreal dream.

—Neha Jambhekar

 

Lancelot Ribeiro
Untitled
Grosvenor Gallery
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Jonas Burgert, Blindstich (2020). Courtesy of Tang Contemporary Art.

Jonas Burgert, Blindstich (2020). Courtesy of Grosvenor Gallery.

The Indian artist Lancelot Ribeiro spent most of his life in London. He was a prolific artist, working in acrylics because they dried more quickly than oils and allowing him to complete more paintings. I love the gentle curves and balance of warm and cool colors in this abstract piece which looks like a cross-section cut from a crystal geode.

—Sara Carson

Jonas Burgert
Blindstich
Tang Contemporary Art
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Jonas Burgert, Blindstich (2020). Courtesy of Tang Contemporary Art.

Jonas Burgert, Blindstich (2020). Courtesy of Tang Contemporary Art.

In this painting, a figure is shown dressed in colorful drapes and adorned in leaves of purple and green with silky, fluttering ribbons and geometrical shapes covering the chest and head. As in the case of this work, mythological and mystical elements are often present in Burgert’s paintings. His paintings are celebration are a balance between memory and imagination, as he said: “for me, it is not interesting to show what it’s there, it’s interesting to show what’s also there. The subtext. I try to see what’s behind the people around me. What’s behind the surface.”

—Yi Zhang


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