Can’t Make it to TEFAF New York? Here Are 5 International Galleries Focused on Old Masters to Check Out Instead

Still lifes are coming your way.

Martinus Nellius, Still life with wine glass, lobster and oysters along with fruits. Courtesy of Torres Nieto Fine Arts.
Martinus Nellius, Still life with wine glass, lobster and oysters along with fruits. Courtesy of Torres Nieto Fine Arts.

Three things come to mind when TEFAF New York Fall rolls around: oysters, champagne, and Old Masters.

Set in the Park Avenue Armory, the fair, with its plush and gilded opulence, has the feel of a Dutch still life come to life. And with more than 90 galleries participating in this year’s edition there are more than enough masterpieces for a day of visual indulgence.

But if you can’t make it to New York for the fair—or if your passion for Old Masters knows no bounds—here are five galleries specializing Old Masters in New York, Munich, London, and Paris.

 

Torres Nieto Fine Art, Munich

Abraham van Cuylenborch, Judgement of Paris (17th century). Courtesy of Torres Nieto Fine Arts.

Abraham van Cuylenborch, Judgement of Paris (17th century). Courtesy of Torres Nieto Fine Arts.

If you’re in Munich and a trip to the Alte Pinkothek has whet your appetite for even more sumptuous still lifes and mythological scenes, pop over to the nearby Torres Nieto Fine Arts. Over the past 15 years the gallery has become the Bavarian capital’s go-to for Old Master paintings. But there’s more on offer too, with a rich assortment of silver, porcelain, and ethnographic objects, and even a few modern paintings, coming through its doors.

Torres Nieto Fine Art, Türkenstrasse 96, Munich.

 

Ruzhnikov, London 

Circle of Cornelis van Dalem, The Legend of the Baker of Eeklo (1570–1580). Courtesy of Ruzhnikov.

Circle of Cornelis van Dalem, The Legend of the Baker of Eeklo (1570–80). Courtesy of Ruzhnikov.

If your predilections vary from outrageous 16th-century mythological scenes (like the picture above) to the decadence of Fabergé eggs, London’s Ruzhnikov is worth exploring. At the helm of the operation is Andre Ruzhnikov, a celebrated dealer with more than four decades of experience in the international art market. His specialty is in Russian antiques and artworks, which you’ll find a lot of here.

Ruzhnikov is by appointment only. Please call +44 (0)78 6663 8973. 

 

Robert Simon Fine Art, New York

Carlo Francesco Nuvolone, The Death of Dido, Queen of Carthage (17th century). Courtesy of Robert Simon Fine Art.

Carlo Francesco Nuvolone, The Death of Dido, Queen of Carthage (17th century). Courtesy of Robert Simon Fine Art.

The Italian and Spanish masters of the Renaissance were dynamos of chiaroscuro—and these dramatically lit scenes are a staple at New York’s Robert Simon Fine Art. But you’ll also find a highly curated selection of colonial paintings of the Americas, Northern Renaissance, and British art on view.

Robert Simon Fine Art, 22 East 80th Street, New York.

 

Didier Aaron, New York, London, Paris 

Jean-Baptiste Oudry, White Greyhound (1748). Courtesy of Didier Aaron.

Jean-Baptiste Oudry, White Greyhound (1748). Courtesy of Didier Aaron.

Each of Didier Aaron’s three locations presents distinct but complementary programming—here the emphasis is on French and European decorative arts, drawings and paintings from the 17th through 19th centuries, while occasional exhibitions of contemporary art are an enlivening addition.

Didier Aaron, 32 East 67th Street, New York; 152, Boulevard Haussmann, Paris; 15 Clifford Street, London.

 

Trinity Fine Art, London

Frans Floris the Elder, Suzanna and the Elders (1548). Courtesy of Trinity Fine Art.

Frans Floris the Elder, Suzanna and the Elders (1548). Courtesy of Trinity Fine Art.

In the 35 years since London’s Trinity Fine Art was founded, the gallery has made a name for itself as one of the leading sources for paintings from the Renaissance to the 19th century (it recently offered the $30 million Botticelli at Frieze Masters). In 2006, leadership of the company passed to Carlo Orsi, the former chairman of the Association of Italian Art Dealers, and it unsurprisingly boasts an especially robust inventory of Italian masterpieces.

Trinity Fine Art, 15 Old Bond Street, London.


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