Can Olafur Eliasson’s Solar-Powered Phone Charger Make the World a Greener Place?

Olafur Eliason with his parrot and engineer Frederik Ottesen. Photo: Little Sun via Kickstarter

Danish artist Olafur Eliasson has launched a kickstarter campaign to gain funding for a portable, solar-powered phone charger. At the time of writing, with 31 days still left to go, the campaign has already raised more than €92,000—nearly double the targeted €50,000.

The device known as Little Sun Charge is described as “a high performance solar phone charger and light.” The charger was designed by the artist himself and engineered by Frederik Ottesen.

The Little Sun Charge can fully charge a device after 5 hours of exposure to sunlight.   Photo: Little Sun via Kickstarter

The Little Sun Charge can fully charge a device after 5 hours of exposure to sunlight.
Photo: Little Sun via Kickstarter

In a statement on the device’s kickstarter page, the artist said “Our actions have consequences for the world. Little Sun is a wedge that opens up the urgent discussion about bringing sustainable energy to all from the perspective of art; to raise awareness about energy access, and the sequel distribution of energy today.”

The sun is of course a central theme to the artist’s practice. In 2003, Eliasson created the iconic The Weather Project installation at the Tate Modern in London.

Eliason's sun themed installation The Weather Project (2003). Photo: Little Sun via Kickstarter

Eliason’s sun themed installation The Weather Project (2003).
Photo: Little Sun via Kickstarter

Contributors can look forward to a range of interesting incentives such as “the undying love” of the artist’s parrot for a contribution of only €2. On the other end of the scale, backers who donate €7,000 can look forward to a lunch invitation with Eliasson at his Berlin studio.

The device is designed to be used on the go. Photo: Little Sun via Kickstarter

The device is designed to be used on the go.
Photo: Little Sun via Kickstarter

Eliasson concludes “I believe that art can change the world by making an issue as urgent as energy access not just understandable for the mind but also physically tangible. This experience can lead us to recognize our interconnectivity, what we have in common, and it moves us to act.”

Related stories:

Olafur Eliasson Floods Danish Museum with River Installation

Olafur Eliasson Wants You to Create a Lego Utopia on the High Line

Olafur Eliasson Among 150 Artists to Convene in Mexico City for Rolex Arts Weekend

Olafur Eliasson Launches Online Artwork Doubling as Archive


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