Your Go-To Guide to Events at Art Basel in Hong Kong 2016

From a peek at Uli Sigg's collection to a dancing robot.

Hong Kong, skyline of Victoria Harbour.
Hong Kong, skyline of Victoria Harbour.
Photo: Pixabay.

As the art scene grows increasingly international, the weeks on the calendar without some major event someone are becoming few and far between. This week, art collectors, gallerists, and museum professionals descend on Hong Kong for the 2016 edition of Art Basel in Hong Kong, now in its fourth year. As you might expect, there’s no shortage of exhibitions and events planned to coincide with the annual fair. Here’s artnet News’s guide of what to do and see if you are in Hong Kong this week.

Bus in Hong Kong advertising the fairImage: Courtesy Art Basel

Bus in Hong Kong advertising the fair
Image: Courtesy Art Basel

1. Art Basel in Hong Kong
With 239 galleries, the fair has a noticeably regional flavor, with about half of the dealers hailing from Asia and the Pacific. With sectors highlighting emerging contemporary artists, large-scale sculptures, and projects from Asian and Asian Pacific galleries, the big fair is undeniably the number one reason the art world is turning its eye to Hong Kong this week.

March 22–26, 2016
Tuesday (Private View) 3:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.; Wednesday (Private View) 1:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m. (Vernissage) 5:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.; Thursday–Saturday 11:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.
Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, 1 Expo Dr, Wan Chai
HK$150 (approximately $19) and up

Tatsuo Miyajima, <em>Time Waterfall</em> (rendering). Photo: courtesy Art Basel in Hong Kong.

Tatsuo Miyajima, Time Waterfall (rendering). Photo: courtesy Art Basel in Hong Kong.

2. Time Waterfall by Tatsuo Miyajima
This large-scale public light art project will turn Hong Kong’s International Commerce Centre into a canvas with a cascade of numbers streaming down the face of the building. The numbers, which range from one to nine, but never reach zero, in reference to the Buddhist concept of non-existence, or Sunya.

March 21–26, 2016
intermittently, 7:20 p.m.–10:00 p.m.
International Commerce Centre, 1 Austin Rd W, West Kowloon
(recommended public viewing locations are Tamar Park, Sun Yat Sen Memorial Park and the terrace on Podium 3 and 4 of the IFC Mall)

Uli Sigg with a portrait of himself created by Zhao Bandi in a film still from the documentary film <em>The Chinese Lives of Uli Sigg</em>. <br>Photo: <em>The Chinese Lives of Uli Sigg</em>.

Uli Sigg with a portrait of himself created by Zhao Bandi in a film still from the documentary film The Chinese Lives of Uli Sigg.
Photo: The Chinese Lives of Uli Sigg.

3. “M+ Sigg Collection: Four Decades of Chinese Contemporary Art
The M+ museum in West Kowloon, Hong Kong is still under construction, but you can still see highlights from Uli Sigg‘s collection of Chinese contemporary art in at Artistree, an exhibition space in a Hong Kong office tower. The 80 paintings, sculptures, installation, and video art pieces on view are just a fraction of the 1,510-work collection M+ acquired from Sigg in 2012.

Art Basel in Hong Kong also kicked off its Film program with a screening of Michael Schindhelm’s 2016 documentary, The Chinese Lives of Uli Sigg, recounting the 30 years Sigg has spent in China.

February 23–April 5, 2016
through March 22, 11:00 a.m.–8:00 p.m.; March 23–April 5, 10:00 a.m.–8:00 p.m.
1/F King’s, Taikoo Place Cornwall House, King’s Rd, Quarry Bay
Free

Takashi Murakami, Jellyfish Eyes (2012). Masashi and Saki. Photo: courtesy Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd., and Blum & Poe, New York.

Takashi Murakami, Jellyfish Eyes (2012). Masashi and Saki.
Photo: courtesy Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd., and Blum & Poe, New York.

4. Jellyfish Eyes by Takashi Murakami
Takashi Murakami’s 2013 live action/animated film Jellyfish Eyes deals with the aftermath of Japan’s devastating tsunami as experienced through the eyes of a child. (The film previously headlined the film sector at last summer’s Art Basel in Basel.)

March 25, 4:00 p.m.–5:40
Theatre 2 at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre

Ahn Doo-Jin, <em>They Are Stones</em> (2014). <br>Photo: courtesy of Leekwaik Gallery.

Ahn Doo-Jin, They Are Stones (2014).
Photo: courtesy of Leekwaik Gallery.

5. Art Central 
Wherever Art Basel goes, satellite fairs proliferate, and Hong Kong is no exception. Now in its second year, Art Central brings over 100 galleries from 21 countries to the city’s art fair scene.

March 21–26, 2016
March 21 (First Night) 5:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.; March 22 (VIP preview) 10:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.; March 23 and 24, (VIP preview) 11:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m., 12:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.; March 25, 11:00 a.m.–7:00 p.m.; March 26, 11:00 a.m.– 6:00 p.m.
Central Harbourfront Event Space, 9 Lung Wo Road, Central
HK$230 (approximately $30) for two tickets (buy one get one free)

Conrad Shawcross, <em>The ADA Project</em> (2013). Installation view at-Palais de Tokyo Paris.-Photo: courtesy the artist and Victoria Miro London.

Conrad Shawcross, The ADA Project (2013). Installation view at-Palais de Tokyo Paris.-Photo: courtesy the artist and Victoria Miro London.

6. “The ADA Project” by Conrad Shawcross
An ingenious dancing robot from British artist Conrad Shawcross will “conduct” music by Mira Calix in the lobby of the Peninsula Hotel. The piece is inspired by 19th-century mathematician Ada Lovelace, daughter of Lord Byron.

March 22–April 6, 2016
performances March 23, 3:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. and the evening of March 24
The Peninsula Hong Kong, Salisbury Rd, Hong Kong

Cui Jie, <em>Entrance to Parking Lot</em> (2014). Photo: courtesy HACK SPACE.

Cui Jie, Entrance to Parking Lot (2014).
Photo: courtesy HACK SPACE.

7. Hack Space, K11 Foundation pop-up
The K11 Art Foundation (KAF) has teamed up with London’s Serpentine Galleries for this group show featuring New Zealand-born artist Simon Denny and 11 Chinese artists. The theme is shan zhai, a Chinese concept of copying that has gained increasing acceptance as a creative tool for problem solving, or hacking.

March 21–April 24, 2016
K11 Art Foundation Pop-up Space, G/F, Cosco Tower, 33 Wing Lok Street, Sheung Wan, Hong Kong

Brian Gothong Tan, <em>Imelda Goes to Singapore</em> (2006). <br>Photo: courtesy Para Site.

Brian Gothong Tan, Imelda Goes to Singapore (2006).
Photo: courtesy Para Site.

8. “Afterwork
Issues of class, race, labor, and migration in Hong Kong and the surrounding region come to the fore in this group show, which calls attention to the plight of the city’s domestic workers, who are mostly women from Indonesia and the Philippines.

March 19–May 29, 2016
Wednesday–Sunday, 12:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.
Para Site 22/F, Wing Wah Industrial Building, 677 King’s Road, Quarry Bay

Larry Bell, "Pacific Place," installation view. <Br>Photo: courtesy Swire Properties and United Talent Agency.

Larry Bell, “Pacific Place,” installation view.
Photo: courtesy Swire Properties and United Talent Agency.

9. “Pacific Red” by Larry Bell
Light and Space artist Larry Bell debuts new work at “contemporary lifestyle destination” Pacific Place. On the occasion of the exhibition, Bell will participate with a conversation at the convention center with architect Hugh Dutton, moderated by Graham Steele of Hauser Wirth & Schimmel.

March 19–April 17, 2016
Pacific Place Mall and the Upper House, 88, Queensway, Admiralty

conversation March 23, 2:00 p.m.
Swire Properties Lounge, Level 1, Hong Kong Convention & Exhibition Centre

Park Seo-Bo, <em>Ecriture (描法) No.101116</em> (2010). ,br>Photo: courtesy Galerie Perrotin.

Park Seo-Bo, Ecriture (描法) No.101116 (2010). ,br>Photo: courtesy Galerie Perrotin.

10. “Ecriture” by Park Seo-Bo
A seminal figure in Korean contemporary art who helped found the Dansaekhwa monochrome movement, Park Seo-Bo has tapped into Asian philosophy to create his repetitive linear paintings.

March 21–May 5, 2016
Galerie Perrotin, 50 Connaught Road Central, 50 Connaught Rd Central

Tracey Emin, "I Cried Because I Love You" installation view at Lehmann Maupin, Hong Kong. Photo: Kitmin Lee, courtesy of the artist and Lehmann Maupin and White Cube

Tracey Emin, “I Cried Because I Love You” installation view at Lehmann Maupin, Hong Kong.
Photo: Kitmin Lee, courtesy of the artist and Lehmann Maupin and White Cube

11. “I Cried Because I Love You” by Tracey Emin
The British artist presents deeply personal work at both White Cube and Lehmann Maupin galleries, with plans to take a year-long sabbatical following the dual exhibition.

March 21–May 21, 2016
White Cube (50 Connaught Rd Central, Central) and Lehmann Maupin (12 Pedder Street, Central)

Robert Rauschenberg, <em>Earth Haunts/ROCI VENEZUELA</em> (1985). <br>Photo: © 2016 Robert Rauschenberg Foundation / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY.

Robert Rauschenberg, Earth Haunts/ROCI VENEZUELA (1985).
Photo: © 2016 Robert Rauschenberg Foundation / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY.

12. Robert Rauschenberg
The great, late, Robert Rauschenberg makes his Hong Kong debut with this selection of works from his “Shiner,” “Spread,” and “Urban Bourbon” series.

March 21–May 12, 2016
Pace Gallery, 15C Entertainment Building
30 Queens Road Central

Dan Colen at Gagosian Gallery Hong Kong installation view. <br>Photo: artnet.

Dan Colen at Gagosian Gallery Hong Kong installation view.
Photo: artnet.

13. “When I’m Gone” by Dan Colen 
Dan Colen brings his seemingly-delicate flower paintings to his first solo outing in Hong Kong. Despite their beauty, the works are created using unconventional materials such as rubber mallets and a dildo, which Colen uses to smash both real and fake flowers onto his canvases.

March 21–May 13, 2016
Gagosian Gallery, 7/F Pedder Building, 12 Pedder Street, Central

A courtroom sketch of Domenico De Sole on the witness stand with the fake Rothko painting he bought from Knoedler gallery. Photo: Elizabeth Williams, courtesy ILLUSTRATED COURTROOM.

A courtroom sketch of Domenico De Sole on the witness stand with the fake Rothko painting he bought from Knoedler gallery.
Photo: Elizabeth Williams, courtesy ILLUSTRATED COURTROOM.

14. Art Law 360 panel
Buying art at the blue chip level opens up a whole range of legal issues. Collectors and advisers hoping to better understand art as an asset/investment can hear from such experts as Cynthia E. Sachs of Athena Art Finance and Christine Steiner and Diana Wierbicki, art lawyers from the firm Witherworldwide, on legal issues related to buying, financing, holding, lending, selling, and donating art collections.

March 23, 2016, 12:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.
The Hong Kong Club, 1 Jackson Road, Central


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