12 Artworks From Artnet’s Gallery Network That Our Experts Are Loving This Week

Each week, our gallery liaisons share their favorite works from the Artnet Gallery Network.

Coco Dávez, Coco (2019). Courtesy of Maddox Gallery.
Coco Dávez, Coco (2019). Courtesy of Maddox Gallery.

Every week, we explore the thousands of galleries on the Artnet Gallery Network to highlight the spaces and artworks inspiring us right now. Take a look at our latest picks below.

Avish Khebrehzadeh
The Vacant Hour
M77 Gallery
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Miriam Minak

Avish Khebrehzadeh, The Vacant Hour (2018). Courtesy of M77 Gallery. 

This introverted, exhausted looking girl sits in an ambiguous and mysterious space. Is it a mystical garden or a frontally lit stage? Is this a real moment or is she trapped in a dream? After all, the stool she sits upon is only hinted as a fragment. Iranian-born artist Avish Khebrehzadeh offers us an uncertain scene and invites us to fill this void.

Miriam Minak

Joseph Kosuth
Existential Time #6
Galleria Lia Rumma
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Tobias Molitor

Joseph Kosuth, Existential Time #6 (2019). Courtesy Galleria Lia Rumma.

This piece by Joseph Kosuth allows us to reflect on our perception of time. By reading the sentence as well as the clock, the viewer is immediately connected to the artwork and also in one, sole moment: the here and now.

Tobias Molitor

Henrik Uldalen
Graze
JD Malat Gallery
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Tara Wyant

Henrik Uldalen, Graze (2019). Courtesy of JD Malat Gallery.

These thickly impastoed portraits by Henrik Uldalen explore various states of human emotion, while simultaneously reflecting on the current political climate. In a departure from the artist’s previous, darker bodies of work, we see a lot of pink, which represents the rosy veil in which we choose to cope with the uncomfortable parts of our lives.

Tara Wyant

Coco Dávez
Yayoi
Maddox Gallery
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Sara Carson

Coco Dávez, Yayoi (2019). Courtesy of Maddox Gallery.

Wearing her trademark red wig and polka dots, Yayoi Kusama is undoubtedly an art superstar, but also remains an enigmatic and multi-layered character. Coco Dávez captures both those realties perfectly in this fresh, modern take on the portrait from her ‘Faceless’ series. 

Sara Carson

Eleanor Aldrich
The Bicycle
Channel to Channel
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Santiago Garcia

Eleanor Aldrich, The Bicycle (2018). Courtesy of Channel to Channel.

Aldrich has an exciting sense for materials that she uses well in fleshy images that verge on trompe l’oeil. The varying paints and application methods match the industrial objects depicted while leaving room for more legible flat abstractions. There is a certain dewy sheen she creates here that perfectly encapsulates the spirit of summer leisure, which, in the dead of winter, makes Bicycle a nostalgic portrait of a much longed for two-wheeled ride.

Santiago Garcia Cano

Michelle Wilcox
TILTED PALM
Venvi Art Gallery
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Qadira Farrington

Michelle Wilcox, TILTED PALM (2019). Courtesy of Venvi Art Gallery.

This expressive painting reminds me of being in South Beach earlier this month during Art Basel. I can imagine myself back there under a palm tree, feeling a nice ocean breeze and, ideally, with a cocktail in hand. The haziness of the brushstrokes reminds me of the foggy-headed dreaminess of just waking up from a seaside nap. 

Qadira Farrington

Donald Moffett
Lot 072619 (The New Damson)
Marianne Boesky Gallery
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Neha Jambhekar

Donald Moffett, Lot 072619 (the new damson) (2019). Courtesy of Marianne Boesky Gallery.

I love the shape and shine of the resin in this sculpture, like a large drop of perfectly splattered nail polish. Donald Moffett really has a knack for capturing organic forms in this medium and this work truly embodies the term “eye-candy”.

Neha Jambhekar

Ellsworth Kelly
Pear II
Susan Sheehan Gallery
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Manager, Gallery Network

Ellsworth Kelly, Pear II (1965–1966). Courtesy of Susan Sheehan Gallery

In a brief departure from his iconic geometric abstractions, Ellsworth Kelly employs his uncompromising style to the fruit depicted in this work. He captures the essence of the subject using simple lines that are assured in their ability to represent the fruit, yet waver delicately in execution. He is cautious in his process, but confident in the result.

Nan Stewart 

Yann Gross and Arguiñe Escandón
Alas
Wilde
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Yann Gross and Arguiñe Escandón, Alas (2019). Courtesy of Wilde.

Yann Gross and Arguiñe Escandón, Alas (2019). Courtesy of Wilde.

This photograph by Yann Gross and Arguiñe Escandón was taken in Peru and can currently be admired at the Galerie Wilde in Geneva. Appearing at once sad and proud, the indigenous woman presents a bird’s wing intact and utterly beautiful. This photograph comes from the series ‘Tamamuri,’ which started in 2018.

—Alexandra Schott

Robert Rauschenberg
Daze (from Speculations)
Apprize Art
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Karin Petit

Robert Rauschenberg, Daze (from Speculations)(1997). Courtesy of Apprize Art.

This screenprint by Rauschenberg combines a front porch with chairs and a lake-like reflection of the trees and sky, but the combination is dreamy and disorienting, It gives the impression of memory, bits and pieces of a summer flooding the mind.

Karin Petit 

 

 

Bex Massey
Full English
House2Six
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Bex Massey, Full English (2019). Courtesy of House2Six. 

Bex Massey, Full English (2019). Courtesy of House2Six.

Massey’s artworks delve deep into the consumer culture from the 80s and 90s, the artist’s childhood years. Here, dwarves from the Disney version of Snow White are mixed with brightly colored, circular patterns and a pink, almost flesh-like area on the upper-left, to oddly arresting effect.  

Julia Yook

Melanie Smith
Cat 4
Galeria Nara Roesler
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Melanie Smith, Cat 4 (2015). Courtesy of Galeria Nara Roesler. 

Melanie Smith, Cat 4 (2015). Courtesy of Galeria Nara Roesler.

This oil and encaustic work by British artist Melanie Smith is a dreamy rendition of the internet’s favorite animal: the cat. The tan and seafoam green tones add to the haziness of the medium and give the work the oddly classical appearance of a Renaissance-era fresco.

Cristina Cruz


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