10 Artworks From Artnet’s Gallery Network That Our Experts Are Loving This Week

Each week, our gallery liaisons share their favorite works from the Artnet Gallery Network.

Georges Rousse, Rognes (2018). Courtesy of Galerie Springer.
Georges Rousse, Rognes (2018). Courtesy of Galerie Springer.

Every week, we explore the thousands of galleries on the Artnet Gallery Network to highlight the spaces and artworks inspiring us right now. Take a look at our latest picks below.

 

Ugo Rondinone
Sun 6
Meyerovich Gallery
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Ugo Rondinone, Sun 6. Courtesy of Meyerovich Gallery,

Ugo Rondinone, Sun 6. Courtesy of Meyerovich Gallery.

This brilliantly colorful painting comes from Ugo Rondinone’s series of eight “Sun Paintings,” which are an homage to the sun’s radiance.  In our turbulent times, it’s delightful brightness is just what we need.

—Julia Yook

 

Ed Ruscha
Safe and Effective Medication
David Benrimon Fine Art, LLC
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Ed Ruscha, Safe and Effective Medication (2001). Courtesy of David Benrimon Fine Art, LLC.

Ed Ruscha, Safe and Effective Medication (2001). Courtesy of David Benrimon Fine Art, LLC.

Ed Ruscha is an expert at juxtaposing imagery and text in affective and often subversive ways. Here, a supposedly calming text is contrasted by the image of an upcoming storm. 

—Karin Petit

Victor Brauner
Envolement
AM Arte Moderna
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Victor Brauner, Envolement (1958). Courtesy of AM Arte Moderna.

Victor Brauner, Envolement (1958). Courtesy of AM Arte Moderna.

The avant-garde poet Sașa Pană wrote that the works of exiled Romanian Victor Brauner were “exquisite by their bizarreness.” And indeed, Brauner, an important Surrealist, did enable his figures to do the impossible: twisted heads, fantasy creatures both human and animal, and which transcend all spatial dimensions. The fabulous bird shown here also has a human face — an image that is bizarre and exhilarating at once. The title, Envolement, means “soaring” — I wonder how the two will be able to fly away.

—Miriam Minak

Jeffrey Gibson
STAND UP – SPEAK UP
Sikkema Jenkins
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Jeffrey Gibson, STAND UP - SPEAK UP (2020). Courtesy of Sikkema Jenkins.

Jeffrey Gibson, STAND UP – SPEAK UP (2020). Courtesy of Sikkema Jenkins.

Jeffrey Gibson’s use of bright colors, exciting shapes, and encouraging words is much-needed encouragement to keep us focused — and engage —during this interesting time we are living through.

—Qadira Farrington

Tran Huy Hoan
Intertwined
AiBo
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Tran Huy Hoan, Intertwined (2010). Courtesy of AiBo.

Tran Huy Hoan, Intertwined (2010). Courtesy of AiBo.

The layered reds of this painting are both passionate and haunting. Tran Huy Hoan is known for his surreal and sensual depictions of figures alone. Here, the image of a sole figure seated with their legs pulled up forlornly to its chest feels particularly pertinent in the self-quarantine state we find ourselves in. 

—Santiago Garcia Cano

Georges Rousse
Chasse-sur-Rhône
Galerie Springer
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Georges Rousse, Chasse-sur-Rhône (2010). Courtesy of Galerie Springer.

Georges Rousse, Chasse-sur-Rhône (2010). Courtesy of Galerie Springer.

Georges Rousse started taking photographs at the age of nine. He later began to combine installation, painting, and photography to create revealing dialogues within architectural spaces. Here, I especially like the deep blue, which opens the space into another dimension.

—Alexandra Schott

David Bailey
Marie Helvin (Shoe in Knickers)
Camera Eye
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David Bailey, Marie Helvin (Shoe in Knickers) (1976–2007). Courtesy of Camera Eye.

David Bailey, Marie Helvin (Shoe in Knickers) (1976). Courtesy of Camera Eye.

British photographer David Bailey shot this image of Marie Helvin, his then-wife, in crisp black-and-white that evocatively captures the glamour and sex appeal of the disco era. 

—Sara Carson

Jean Cocteau
Tete d’homme
Fairhead Fine Art
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Jean Cocteau, Tete d'homme (1958). Courtesy of Fairhead Fine Art.

Jean Cocteau, Tete d’homme (1958). Courtesy of Fairhead Fine Art.

A poet, playwright, novelist, filmmaker, and art, Jean Cocteau was one of the most versatile and creative thinkers of the 20th century. This pastel, with its lively, simple lines, and surrealist subject matter, is typical of the artist’s hand. 

— Tara Wyant

Shepard Fairey
No Future
Famous Amsterdam
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Shepard Fairey, No Future (2017). Courtesy of Famous Amsterdam.

Shepard Fairey, No Future (2017). Courtesy of Famous Amsterdam.

Skateistan is a non-profit organization that establishes skateboard parks and projects in developing nations. The organization specializes in artist editions solely printed on skateboards, usually as a triptych such as this piece which was made in collaboration with ultra-famous street artist Shepard Fairey.

—Tobias Molitor

Yoo Sun-Tai
The Words: My Garden
Gana Art Gallery
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Yoo Sun-Tail, The Words: My Garden (2014). Courtesy of Gana Art Gallery.

Yoo Sun-Tail, The Words: My Garden (2014). Courtesy of Gana Art Gallery.

Yoo Sun-Tai’s surreal landscape deploys the technique known as dépaysement or the estrangement of the viewer by painting or arranging ordinary objects differently from their original or intended use. Familiar but estranged, realistic but fantastic, Yoo’s works juxtapose dichotomies on the pictorial plane. Instead of engendering any confrontations, the artist makes sure that the organic and dreamlike images flow into a harmonious and unified whole. “The Words,” a phrase which is attached to all his works’ titles, denotes an ambivalence between auditory and visual senses. The bicyclist — another motif ubiquitous omnipresent to his works — symbolizes the artist himself, as he traverses different dimensions to make sense of the world in his own way. 

—Yi Zhang


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